Gene editing in blood stem cells just got easier

Genome editing is a field of science that’s been around for awhile, but has experienced an explosion of activity and interest in recent years. Chances are that even your grandmother has heard about the recent story where for the first time, gene editing saved a one-year-old girl from dying of leukemia.

Microsoft word versus genome editing

To give you an idea of what this technique involves, think back to the last time you had to write a report. You let all your ideas flow out onto the page, but then realize that certain sentences or paragraphs need to be rearranged, removed, or added. So you copy, paste, and move stuff around with your mouse and keyboard until you’re satisfied.

Image source: Broad Institute

Image source: Broad Institute

Tools for editing the genome (which contain all of our genes) work a similar way, but they cut and paste DNA sequences in the human genome instead of words on a page. Scientists have figured out how to use these “genetic scissors” to delete genes (so they no longer have function) and to correct disease-causing mutations (by pasting in the normal DNA sequence of a gene to restore function). Both these abilities make genome editing a highly valuable tool for scientists to model diseases and to develop therapies to treat them.

There are multiple tools that researchers are currently using to modify the human genome. The main ones are fancifully named ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPRs. All three use engineered proteins called nucleases to cut strands of DNA at specific locations in the genome. A cell’s DNA repair machinery will then either glue the DNA strands back together (this typically results in the loss of DNA and gene function), or repair the break by copying and pasting in the missing sequence of DNA from a template (you can correct disease-causing mutations this way by providing a donor template). We don’t have time to get into more details about how these tools work, but you can learn more by reading this fact sheet from Science Media Centre.

Some cells are more stubborn than others

While genome editing technologies offer many advantages for modifying human genes, it’s not a perfect science. There are still many limitations and roadblocks that need to be addressed to make sure that these tools can be safely and effectively used as therapies in humans.

Besides the obvious worry about “off-target effects” (when the genetic scissors cut random sections of DNA, which can cause big problems), another issue with genome editing tools is that some types of cells are harder to genetically modify than others.

Such is the case with blood stem cells, also known as hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), that live in our bone marrow and make all the different blood cells in our body. Initial studies reported difficulty in delivering genome editing tools into human HSPCs, which is a problem if you want to use these tools to help cure patients suffering from genetic blood or immune diseases.

Human blood (red) and immune cells (green) are made from hematopoietic/blood stem cells. Photo credit: ZEISS Microscopy.

Human blood (red) and immune cells (green) are made from hematopoietic/blood stem cells. Photo credit: ZEISS Microscopy.

Have no fear, blood-stem cell editing is here

We are happy to inform you that a CIRM-funded study published today in Nature Biotechnology has developed a solution to the problem of hard-to-edit blood stem cells. Scientists from the USC Keck School of Medicine and from Sangamo BioSciences developed a new delivery method that allows for efficient genome editing of human HSPCs using zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs).

They used a viral delivery system to deliver ZFNs to distinct locations in the genome of HSPCs and successfully inserted a gene sequence that made the cells turn green under a fluorescent microscope. The virus they used was a harmless form of an adeno-associated virus (AAV), which can enter certain cells and delivery the researcher’s DNA cargo with a very low chance of altering or inserting its own DNA into the HSPC genome.

Using an AAV that was exceptionally good at entering HPSCs, they virally delivered ZFNs to specific gene locations in HSPCs that had been isolated from human blood and from fetal liver tissue. They found that delivering the ZFNs as mRNA molecules allowed the protein versions they turned into to be temporarily expressed in HSPCs. This produced a high rate of gene insertion (ranging from 15-40% of cells treated), while keeping off-target effects and cell death low. Even the most hard-to-edit HSPCs, called the primitive HSPCs, were modified. This result was really exciting because no other study has reported gene editing with this level of efficiency in this primitive population of blood stem cells.

The tools work but what about the cells?

After proving that they were able to successfully edit the genomes of HSPCs with high efficiency, they next asked whether the modified cells could grow in culture and create new blood cells when transplanted into mice.

While their method to deliver ZFNs into the HSPCs did cause some of the cells to die (around 20%), the majority that survived were able to multiply in a dish and specialize into various blood cells when grown in cultures. When the modified HSPCs were taken a step further and transplanted into immune-deficient mice (meaning their immune system is compromised and won’t attack transplanted cells), they not only survived, but they also specialized into many different types of blood cells while still retaining their genomic modifications.

Now here is where I want to give the researchers a high five. They decided that once wasn’t enough, and challenged their modified HSPCs to a second round of transplantation. They collected the bone marrow from mice that received the first transplant of modified HSPCs, and transferred it into another immune-deficient mouse. Five months later, they found that the modified cells were still there and had generated other blood cell types. Because these modified HSPCs lasted for so long and through two rounds of transplants, the authors concluded that they had successfully edited the primitive, long-term repopulating HSPCs.

Next stop, the clinic?

In summary, this study offers a new and improved method to genetically modify blood stem cells in all their forms.

So what’s next? The obvious hope is the clinic.


HIV (yellow) infecting a human immune cell. Photo credit: Seth Pincus, Elizabeth Fischer and Austin Athman, NIH.

It’s a likely future as the study was conducted in collaboration with Sangamo BioSciences. They specialize in ZFN-mediated gene therapy and have a number of preclinical therapeutic programs, many of which focus on genetic diseases that affect the blood and immune system, as well as ongoing clinical trials using ZFNs to treat patients with HIV/AIDs. (One of these trials is funded by CIRM, read more here).

In a USC press release, Dr. Michael Holmes, VP of Research at Sangamo and co-senior author on the paper hinted at future clinical applications:

Michael Holmes, Sangamo BioSciences

Michael Holmes, Sangamo BioSciences


Our results provide a strategy for broadening the application of gene editing technologies in HSPCs. This significantly advances our progress towards applying gene editing to the treatment of human diseases of the blood and immune systems.



Co-senior author and USC Professor Dr. Paula Cannon echoed Dr. Holmes:

Gene therapy using HSPCs has enormous potential for treating HIV and other diseases of the blood and immune systems.

One last question

A question that I had after reading this exciting study was whether other genome editing tools such as CRISPR could produce better results in blood stem cells using a similar viral delivery method.

CRISPR is described as a faster, cheaper, and easier gene editing technology compared to ZFNs and TALENS (for a comparison, check out this fun article by The Jackson Laboratory). And many scientists, both in academia and industry, are pushing CRISPR gene editing towards clinical applications.

When I asked Paula Cannon about which gene editing technology, ZFNs or CRISPRs, is better for therapeutic development, she said:

Paula Cannon, USC Professor

Paula Cannon, USC Professor

In terms of advantages, CRISPRs are easier to work with initially, and this makes them a great lab research tool. But when it comes to developing something for a clinical trial, its much more of a long game, so that initial advantage disappears. The ZFNs I work with have been previously optimized and are well characterized, and the CCR5 ZFNs are already in the clinic so they have a big advantage in that regard when you are trying to develop something for the next clinical application.

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Stem cell stories that caught our eye: cancer fighting virus, lab-grown guts work in dogs, stem cell trial to cure HIV

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Cancer fighting virus approved for melanoma

(Disclaimer: While this isn’t a story about stem cells, it’s pretty cool so I had to include it.)

The term “virus” generally carries a negative connotation, but in some cases, viruses can be the good guys. This was the case on Tuesday when our drug approval agency, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), approved the use of a cancer fighting virus for the treatment of advanced stage melanoma (skin cancer).

The virus, called T-VEC, is a modified version of the herpesvirus, which causes a number of diseases and symptoms including painful blisters and sores in the mouth. Scientists engineered this virus to specifically infect cancer cells and not healthy cells. Once inside cancer cells, T-VEC does what a virus normally does and wreaks havoc by attacking and killing the tumor.

The beauty of this T-VEC is that in the process of killing cancer cells, it causes the release of a factor called GM-CSF from the cancer cells. This factor signals the human immune system that other cancer cells are nearby and they should be attacked and killed by the soldiers of the immune system known as T-cells. The reason why cancers are so deadly is because they can trick the immune system into not recognizing them as bad guys. T-VEC rips off their usual disguise and makes them vulnerable again to attack.

T-VEC recruits immune cells (orange) to attack cancer cells (pink) credit Dr. Andrejs Liepins/SPL

T-VEC recruits immune cells (orange) to attack cancer cells (pink). Photo credit Dr. Andrejs Liepins/SPL.

This is exciting news for cancer patients and was covered in many news outlets. Nature News wrote a great article, which included the history of how we came to use viruses as tools to attack cancer. The piece also discussed options for improving current T-VEC therapy. Currently, the virus is injected directly into the cancer tumor, but scientists hope that one day, it could be delivered intravenously, or through the bloodstream, so that it can kill hard to reach tumors or ones that have spread to other parts of the body. The article suggested combining T-VEC with other cancer immunotherapies (therapies that help the immune system recognize cancer cells) or delivering a personalized “menu” of cancer-killing viruses to treat patients with different types of cancers.

As a side note, CIRM is also interested in fighting advanced stage melanoma and recently awarded $17.7 million to Caladrius Biosciences to conduct a Phase 3 clinical trial with their melanoma killing vaccine. For more, check out our recent blog.

Lab-grown guts work in mice and dogs

If you ask what’s trending right now in stem cell research, one of the topics that surely would pop up is 3D organoids. Also known as “mini-organs”, organoids are tiny models of human organs generated from human stem cells in a dish. To make them, scientists have developed detailed protocols that sometimes involve the use of biological scaffolds (structures on which cells can attach and grow).

A study published in Regenerative Medicine and picked up by Science described the generation of “lab-grown gut” organoids using intestine-shaped scaffolds. Scientists from Johns Hopkins figured out how to grow intestinal lining that had the correct anatomy and functioned properly when transplanted into mice and dogs. Previous studies in this area used flat scaffolds or dishes to grow gut organoids, which weren’t able to form proper functional gut lining.

Lab-grown guts could help humans with gut disorders. (Shaffiey et al., 2015)

Lab-grown guts could help humans with gut disorders. (Shaffiey et al., 2015)

What was their secret recipe? The scientists took stem cells from the intestines of human infants or mice and poured a sticky solution of them onto a scaffold made of suture-like material. The stem cells then grew into healthy gut tissue over the next few weeks and formed tube structures that were similar to real intestines.

They tested whether their mini-guts worked by transplanting them into mice and dogs. To their excitement, the human and mouse lab-grown guts were well tolerated and worked properly in mice, and in dogs that had a portion of their intestine removed. Even more exciting was an observation made by senior author David Hackham:

“The scaffold was well tolerated and promoted healing by recruiting stem cells. [The dogs] had a perfectly normal lining after 8 weeks.”

The obvious question about this study is whether these lab-grown guts will one day help humans with debilitating intestinal diseases like Crohn’s and IBS (inflammatory bowel disorder). Hackam said that while they are still a long way from taking their technology to the clinic, “in the future, scaffolds could be custom-designed for individual human patients to replace a portion of an intestine or the entire organ.”

Clinical trial using umbilical cord stem cells to treat HIV

This week, the first clinical trial using human umbilical cord stem cells to treat HIV patients was announced in Spain. The motivation of this trial is the previous success of the Berlin Patient, Timothy Brown.

The Berlin patient can be described as the holy grail of HIV research. He is an American man who suffered from leukemia, a type of blood cancer, but was also HIV-positive. When his doctor in Berlin treated his leukemia with a stem cell transplant from a bone-marrow donor, he chose a special donor whose stem cells had an inherited mutation in their DNA that made them resistant to infection by the HIV virus. Surprisingly, after the procedure, Timothy was cured of both his cancer AND his HIV infection.

Berlin patient Timothy Brown. Photo credit: Griffin Boyce/Flickr.

Berlin patient Timothy Brown. Photo credit: Griffin Boyce/Flickr.

The National Organization of Transplants (ONT) in Spain references this discovery as its impetus to conduct a stem cell clinical trial to treat patients with HIV and hopefully cure them of this deadly virus. The trial will use umbilical cord blood stem cells instead of bone-marrow stem cells from 157 blood donors that have the special HIV-resistance genetic mutation.

In coverage from Tech Times, the president of the Spanish Society of Hematology and Hemotherapy, Jose Moraleda, was quoted saying:

“This project can put us at the cutting edge of this field within the world of science. It will allow us to gain more knowledge about HIV and parallel offer us a potential option for curing a poorly diagnosed malignant hematological disease.”

The announcement for the clinical trial was made at the Haematology conference in Valencia, and ONT hopes to treat its first patient in December or January.

The Stem Cell Bank is open for business

Creating a stem cell bank

Creating a stem cell bank

When you go to a bank and withdraw money you know that the notes you get are all going to look the same and do the same job, namely allow you to buy things. But when you get stem cells for research that’s not necessarily the case. Stem cells bought from different laboratories don’t always look exactly the same or perform the same in research studies.

That’s why CIRM has teamed up with the Coriell Institute and Cellular Dynamics International (CDI) to open what will be the world’s largest publically available stem cell bank. It officially opened today. In September the Bank will have 300 cell lines available for purchase but plans to increase that to 750 by February 2016.

300 lines but no waiting

Now, even if you are not in the market for stem cells this bank could have a big impact on your life because it creates an invaluable resource for researchers looking into the causes of, and potential therapies for, 11 different diseases including autism, epilepsy and other childhood neurological disorders, blinding eye diseases, heart, lung and liver diseases, and Alzheimer’s disease.

The goal of the Bank – which is located at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, California – is to collect blood or tissue samples from up to 3,000 volunteer donors. Some of those donors have particular disorders – such as Alzheimer’s – and some are healthy. Those samples will then be turned into high quality iPSCs or induced pluripotent stem cells.

Now, iPSC lines are particularly useful for research because they can be turned into any type of cell in the body such as a brain cell or liver cell. And, because the cells are genetically identical to the people who donated the samples scientists can use the cells to determine how, for example, a brain cell from someone with autism differs from a normal brain cell. That can enable them to study how diseases develop and progress, and also to test new drugs or treatments against defects observed in those cells to see which, if any, might offer some benefits.

Power of iPSCs

In a news release Kaz Hirao, Chairman and CEO of CDI, says these could be game changers:

“iPSCs are proving to be powerful tools for disease modeling, drug discovery and the development of cell therapies, capturing human disease and individual genetic variability in ways that are not possible with other cellular models.”

Equally important is that researchers in different parts of the world will be able to compare their findings because they are using the same cell lines. Right now many researchers use cell lines from different sources so even though they are theoretically the same type of tissue, in practice they often produce very different results.

Improving consistency

CIRM Board Chair, Jonathan Thomas, said he hopes the Bank will lead to greater consistency in results.

“We believe the Bank will be an extraordinarily important resource in helping advance the use of stem cell tools for the study of diseases and finding new ways to treat them. While many stem cell efforts in the past have provided badly needed new tools for studying rare genetic diseases, this Bank represents both rare and common diseases that afflict many Californians. Stem cell technology offers a critical new approach toward developing new treatments and cures for those diseases as well.”

Most banks are focused on enriching your monetary account. This bank hopes to enrich people’s lives, by providing the research tools needed to unlock the secrets of different diseases, and pave the way for new treatments.

For more information on how to buy a cell line go to or email

Sonic Hedgehog provides pathway to fight blood cancers

Dr. Catriona Jamieson: Photo courtesy Moores Cancer Center, UCSD

Dr. Catriona Jamieson:
Photo courtesy Moores Cancer Center, UCSD

For a lot of people Sonic Hedgehog is a video game. But for stem cell researcher Dr. Catriona Jamieson it is a signaling pathway in the body that offers a way to tackle and defeat some deadly blood cancers.

Dr. Jamieson – a researcher at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) – has a paper published online today in The Lancet Haematology that highlights the safety and dosing levels for a new drug to treat a variety of blood cancers. CIRM funding helped Dr. Jamieson develop this work.

The drug targets cancer stem cells, the kind of cell that is believed to be able to lie dormant and evade anti-cancer therapies before springing back into action, causing a recurrence of the cancer. The drug coaxes the cancer stem cells out of their hiding space in the bone marrow and gets them to move into the blood stream where they can be destroyed by chemotherapy.

In a news release Dr. Jamieson says the drug – known by the catchy name of PF-04449913 – uses the sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway, an important regulator of the way we develop, to attack the cancer:

“This drug gets that unwanted house guest to leave and never come back. It’s a significant step forward in treating people with refractory or resistant myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome and myelofibrosis. It’s a bonus that the drug can be administered as easily as an aspirin, in a single, daily oral tablet.”

The goal of this first-in-human study was to test the drug for safety; so 47 adults with blood and marrow cancer were given daily doses of the drug for up to 28 days. Those who were able to tolerate the dosage, without experiencing any serious side effects, were then given a higher dose for the next 28 days. Those who experienced problems were taken off the therapy.

Of the 47 people who started the trial in 2010, 28 experienced side effects. However, only three of those were severe. The drug showed signs of clinical activity – meaning it seemed to have an impact on the disease – in 23 people, almost half of those enrolled in the study.

Because of that initial promise it is now being tested in five different Phase 2 clinical trials. Dr. Jamieson says three of those trials are at UCSD:

“Our hope is that this drug will enable more effective treatment to begin earlier and that with earlier intervention, we can alter the course of disease and remove the need for, or improve the chances of success with, bone marrow transplantation. It’s all about reducing the burden of disease by intervening early.”

Stem Cell Stories that Caught our Eye: What’s the Best Way to Treat Deadly Cancer, Destroying Red Blood Cells’ Barricade, Profile of CIRM Scientist Denis Evseenko

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Stem Cells vs. Drugs for Treating Deadly Cancer. When dealing with a potentially deadly form of cancer, choosing the right treatment is critical. But what if that treatment also poses risks, especially for older patients? Could advances in drug development render risky treatments, such as transplants, obsolete?

That was the focus of a pair of studies published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine, where a joint Israeli-Italian research team investigated the comparative benefits of two different treatments for a form of cancer called multiple myeloma.

Multiple myeloma attacks the body’s white blood cells. While rare, it is one of the most deadly forms of cancer—more than half of those diagnosed with the disease do not survive five years after being diagnosed. The standard form of treatment is usually a stem cell transplant, but with newer and better drugs coming on the market, could they render transplants unnecessary?

In the twin studies, the research team divided multiple myeloma patients into two groups. One received a combination of stem cell transplant and chemotherapy, while the other received a combination of drugs including melphalan, prednisone and lenalidmomide. After tracking these patients over a period of four years, the research team saw a clear advantage for those patients that had received the transplant-chemotherapy treatment combination.

To read more about these twin studies check out recent coverage in NewsMaxHealth.

Breaking Blood Cells’ Barricade. The process whereby stem cells mature into red blood cells is, unfortunately, not as fast as scientists would like. In fact, there is a naturally occurring barrier that keeps the production relatively slow. In a healthy person this is not necessarily a problem, but for someone in desperate need of red blood cells—it can prove to be very dangerous.

Luckily, scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found a way to break through this barrier by switching off two key proteins. Once firmly in the ‘off’ position, the team could boost the production of red blood cells.

These findings, published in the journal Blood, are critical in the context of disease anemia, where the patient’s red blood cell count is low. They also may lead to easier methods of stocking blood banks.

Read more about this exciting discovery at HealthCanal.

CIRM Scientist on the Front Lines of Cancer. Finally, HealthCanal has an enlightening profile of Dr. Denis Evseenko, a stem cell scientist and CIRM grantee from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

Born in Russia, the profile highlights Evseenko’s passion for studying embryonic stem cells—and their potential for curing currently incurable diseases. As he explains in the article:

“I had a noble vision to develop progressive therapies for the patient. It was a very practical vision too, because I realized how limited therapeutic opportunities could be for the basic scientist, and I had seen many great potential discoveries die out before they ever reached the clinic. Could I help to create the bridge between stem cells, research and actual therapeutics?”

Upon arriving at UCLA, Evseenko knew he wanted to focus this passion into the study of degenerative diseases and diseases related to aging, such as cancer. His bold vision of bridging the gap between basic and translational research has earned him support not only from CIRM, but also the National Institutes of Health and the US Department of Defense, among others. Says Evseenko:

“It’s my hope that we can translate the research we do and discoveries we make here to the clinic to directly impact patient care.”

Creaky Cell Machinery Affects the Aging Immune System, CIRM-Funded Study Finds

Why do our immune systems weaken over time? Why are people over the age of 60 more susceptible to life-threatening infections and many forms of cancer? There’s no one answer to these questions—but scientists at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), have uncovered an important mechanism behind this phenomenon.

Reporting in the latest issue of the journal Nature, UCSF’s Dr. Emmanuelle Passegué and her team describe how blood and immune cells must be continually replenished over the lifetime of an organism. As that organism ages the complex cellular machinery that churns out new cells begins to falter. And when that happens, the body can become more susceptible to deadly infections, such as pneumonia.

As Passegué so definitively put it in a UCSF news release:

“We have found the cellular mechanism responsible for the inability of blood-forming cells to maintain blood production over time in an old organism, and have identified molecular defects that could be restored for rejuvenation therapies.”

The research team, which examined this mechanism in old mice, focused their efforts on hematopoetic stem cells—a type of stem cell that is responsible for producing new blood and immune cells. These stem cells are present throughout an organism’s lifetime, regularly dividing to preserve their own numbers.

Molecular tags of DNA damage are highlighted in green in blood-forming stem cells. [Credit: UCSF]

Molecular tags of DNA damage are highlighted in green in blood-forming stem cells. [Credit: UCSF]

But in an aging organism, these cells’ ability to generate new copies is not as good as it used to be. When the research team dug deeper they found a key bit of cellular machinery, called the mini-chromosome maintenance helicase, breaks down. When that happens, the DNA inside the cell can’t replicate itself properly—and the newly generated cell is not running on all cylinders.

One of the first things that these old stem cells lose as a result is their ability to make B cells. B cells, a key component of the immune system, normally make antibodies that fight infection. As B cell numbers dwindle in an aging organism, so too does their ability to fight infection. As a result the organism’s risk for contracting dangerous illnesses skyrockets.

This research, which was funded in part by CIRM, not only informs what goes wrong in an aging organism at the molecular level, but also points to new targets that could keep these stem cells functioning at full capacity, helping promote so-called ‘healthy aging.’ As Passegué added:

“Everybody talks about healthier aging. The decline of stem-cell function is a big part of age-related problems. Achieving longer lives relies in part on achieving a better understanding of why stem cells are not able to maintain optimal functioning.”

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: young blood, cord blood, and blood cancers

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Pinning down young blood’s rejuvenating power. A trio of studies in the past week provided more evidence that giving older mice the blood of younger mice can rejuvenate some aspect of their function to a younger state. This has been shown for some years with various tissues, such as CIRM grantee Irina Conboy’s work at UC Berkeley looking at revitalizing older muscle. The recent studies all showed improvement in various aspects of brain function. Most important, the studies started to uncover some reasons for why the young blood could be beneficial when introduced into older animals. Conboy has suggested that one thing it does is provide an environment that lets muscle stem cells do a better job. The three current teams’ work suggests there are probably many factors at play in the young blood. The Boston Globe focused on the work of the Harvard team but puts all three projects in perspective. The San Francisco Business Times focused on the Stanford work and includes an extensive Q&A with the lead researcher.

Expanding cord blood could expand uses. The blood-forming stem cells found in umbilical cord blood have proven extremely valuable as a part of therapy for certain blood cancers. The problem with them is there just are not enough of them in a single cord to treat anyone large than a nine or 10-year-old child. That means when an adult needing a blood stem cell transplant can’t find a matching adult donor and has to resort to cord blood, they receive cells from two cords doubling the chance for severe side effect. Now, a team at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York has found a way to get cord blood stem cells to proliferate in the lab in greater numbers than anyone has in the past. They accomplished the trick by resetting the genetic switches that turn genes on and off. Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News ran a description of the work.

Deciding on banking cord blood. I handle many desperate patient calls here at CIRM, and occasionally get a call from a parent wanting advice about banking their soon-to-be-born child’s cord blood. While I never offer specific advice, I do try to talk through a few factual issues for them to consider, such as the limitation on the number of cells in the cord discussed above. In this Huffington Post blog a mom walks through her family’s decision process for two different pregnancies that came to different, though pretty logical, conclusions for each. She raises many important considerations. However, note that toward the end when she talks about research “advancing” for several diseases, for all those diseases many more years of research will be needed before cord blood therapies become a reality if they ever do.

Blood cancers vs. blood stem cells. One of the difficulties of treating blood cancers is you often end up killing off the vital blood forming stem cells at the same time you destroy the cancer cells. A team at Dartmouth has developed a method to make it easier to distinguish between the stem cells and the cancer cells. Knowing this difference should help researchers find more specific cancer therapies that can destroy the cancer without harming the needed stem cells. Science Codex posted the press release from the medical school. You can read about projects CIRM funds in the field on our leukemia fact sheet.

Don Gibbons