Stem cell stories that caught our eye: getting the right cell, an energy booster, history of controversy and a fun video

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Light used to direct stem cell fate. Stem cells respond to a symphony of cellular signals telling them to remain stem cells or to mature into a specific type of tissue. Much of stem cell biology today has researchers hitting various notes in various rhythms until the score produces a reasonable percentage of the desired tissue.

It’s often a rather discordant process because the cell is not a simple keyboard. A team at the University of California, San Francisco, has used a neat light trick to make the music a little easier to understand. They started with two known facts: that the protein made by the BRN2 gene can drive stem cells to become nerves and that the gene is often turned on in stem cells and they ignore it, choosing to remain stem cells. The UCSF team genetically engineered mouse stem cells so that they could turn on the BRN2 gene with light.

They found that the gene could only drive the production of nerve cells when it was turned on for a relatively long time. They then discovered that the stem cells were responding to another note in the score, a protein that kept the cells in the stem cell state but became depleted after a prolonged period of BRN2 expression.

“There’s lots of promise that we can do these miraculous things like tissue repair or even growing new organs, but in practice, manipulating stem cells has been notoriously noisy, inefficient, and difficult to control,” said Mather Thomson, one of the senior authors on the paper published in Cell Systems and quoted in a university press release widely picked up, including by News Medical. “I think it’s because the cell is not a puppet. It’s an agent that is constantly interpreting information, like a brain. If we want to precisely manipulate cell fate, we have to understand the information-processing mechanisms in the cell that control how it responds to the things we’re trying to do to it.”

Stem cells delivering engines. Jan Nolte, one of our grantees at the University of California, Davis, and editor of the journal Stem Cells, likes to refer to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as little ambulances that rush emergency medical kits to sites of injury. These stem cells that normally hang out in the bone marrow can generate bone, cartilage and blood vessels, but also can deliver a number of chemicals that either tamp down inflammation or summons other repair cells to the scene. The Scientist published a good overview on how MSCs deliver a key repair tool: mitochondria, known as the powerhouse of cells, to cells in need of an energy boost.

Mitochondria are very susceptible to stressors like a heart attack and often are the first parts of a cell to succumb to the stress. While researchers have known for a decade that MSCs can deliver mitochondria to cells, they haven’t known how this happens. They are rapidly gathering that knowledge hoping they to find better ways to harness that particular MSC skill for therapy.

The author walks through a number of discoveries over the past couple years that have begun to paint a picture of this paramedic skill. She also briefly discusses some potential therapies that have been tested in animals.

Embryonic stem cell controversy waning. Pacific Standard, which has become my favorite “thought” magazine even though I have never seen a print copy, published a pretty thorough overview of the early controversy about embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and the many recent scientific advances that may make them unnecessary. The author closes with the fact that for now, advancing those alternatives requires the continued use of ESCs.

Leading with the George W. Bush quote about ESCs being “the leading edge of a series of moral hazards,” he goes on to note that the controversy drove the creation of CIRM and helped Democrats take control of the Senate in 2006. But the bulk of the piece focuses on the alternatives starting with the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of reprogramed adult cells called induced pluripotent stem cells that mimic ESCs. It also covers most recent advances in converting one type of adult cell directly into another type of tissue.

The author closes with a caveat on the ongoing importance of ESCs, at least for now.

“The controversy isn’t over quite yet though—while the newer techniques are immediately useful in research, they have yet to yield any therapies. And because embryonic stem cells are useful for studying how different types of cells develop naturally in the body, they still play an important role in ongoing biomedical research.”

However, he does suggest that eventually, technology will end this controversy.

NOVA video on imagingNOVA video on the brain. Alright, this video only tangentially relates to stem cells and only mentions them toward the end. But it does get at one of the pressing problems in advancing our field: actually seeing what stem cells do at the cell-to-cell and molecular level.

If you are even a casual fan of science, how can you not like a video that starts out with two young scientists using phrases like, “crazy idea,” “wild dream” and “told we’re wasting our time.” It even goes on to talk about “your brain on diapers.” It’s got to be worth the five and a half minutes on the NOVA PBS web site.

It let’s two MIT researchers narrate their effort to image the tiniest of cellular interactions in the brain. Since they found limitations in every existing attempt to see smaller detail, they decided to inflate the brain and make the details larger. They did this by adding the same absorbent material found in diapers to thin slices of mouse brain that had different types of tissues dyed in varying colors. When they added water the brain slice swelled expanding the details.

The result: some really cool images and a tool already being used by scientists around the world. It is now called “expansion microscopy.”

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: A groove for healing hearts, model for muscular dystrophy and the ice bucket worked

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

A tight groove could help heal a heart.  We have written several posts with the theme “It takes a village to raise a stem cell.” If you want a stem cell to mature into a desired tissue you have to pay attention to all aspects of its environment—both the chemicals around it and the physical space.

A team at the Imperial College London has provided the latest chapter to this tale. It turns out if you want stem cells to consistently turn into long fibers of heart muscle, besides providing them with the right chemical signals making them grow in long narrow grooves on lab plate also helps. They got a two-fold increase in heart muscle cells compared to stem cells grown on a flat lab plate.

They’re now trying to figure out why the etched silicon chips worked so well for generating heart muscle. The journal Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine published the work and the web portal myScience picked up the university’s press release.

Stem cell model for muscular dystrophy. In the past, when scientists have looked at muscle samples from patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) to see why they have the characteristic muscle weakening, they ‘ve arrived at the scene of the crime too late. At that point, the cellular missteps had already occurred and all that is left to observe was the damage.

Healthy muscle cells express dystrophin (green), not cells from DMD patients (middle), but treated stem cells from patients do (right)

Healthy muscle cells express dystrophin (green), not cells from DMD patients (middle), but treated stem cells from patients do (right)

So, a team at Kyoto University reprogrammed a patient’s cells to create iPS type stem cells. They then used genetic cues to direct the stem cells to become muscle and watched to see how what went wrong as this process happened.

“Our model allows us to use the same genetic background to study the early stage of pathogenesis which was not possible in the past,” said first author Emi Shoji.

The research published in Scientific Reports and highlighted in a university press release picked up by MedicalXpress documented the level of inappropriate influx of calcium into the cells and showed that a specific cell surface receptor channel was to blame. That receptor will now become a target for new drug therapy for DMD pateints.

Ice bucket results.  The ALS Association raised $220 million in the past year for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, by getting people to dump bucket of ice water over their heads and then make a donation. More important, in just a year a major paper funded by the proceeds of the ice bucket challenge has shown a defect in the nerves of ALS patients and shown that correcting the defect makes the cells healthier. Those are pretty fast results for science.

In a paper published in the prestigious journal Science a team at Johns Hopkins found that one protein, TDP-43, was not doing its job well. When they genetically modified stem cell from ALS patients to correct that defect the cells worked properly. YahooFinance ran a story about the challenge and the new research.

“If we are able to mimic TDP-43’s function in the human neurons of ALS patients, there’s a good chance that we could slow down progression of the disease!” said Jonathan Ling, a researcher on the team. “And that’s what we’re putting all our efforts into right now.”

Of the initial $115 million raised during the early months of the challenge, 67 percent went to research, 20 percent to patient services, and nine percent to public and professional education. Just four percent went to overhead costs of fund raising.

China says it’s cracking down on clinics. I spend a considerable amount of time suggesting callers to our agency be very cautious about considering spending large sums of money to go overseas to get unregulated and unproven stem cell treatment. So, I was pleased to read this morning’s news that China’s top health authority issued regulation to control some of the most questionable clinics.

The regulations reported in China Daily note that any treatments using stem cells for conditions other than proven uses in blood diseases would be considered experimental and could only be conducted in approved hospitals. It noted conditions touted by clinics there including epilepsy, cerebral palsy, spinal cord injury and autism.

“Only eligible hospitals can perform the practice as a clinical trial for research purpose and it must not be charged or advertised. Anyone caught breaking the rules will be punished according to the new regulation,” said Zhang Linming, a senior official of the science and technology department of the commission.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: shutting down cancer stem cells, safer BMT, better gene therapy and a 3rd ear

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

A new route to shut down cancer stem cells. A team at Texas A&M University has discovered a specific protein’s role in keeping cancer stem cells active and shown the pathway it uses to do its dirty deed. That pathway immediately became a target for future cancer therapy.

Although not universally accepted by all cancer researchers, the theory that cancer stem cells circumvent traditional therapy and keep cancers coming back is gaining credence through studies like the current one. The Texas team looked at the protein FGF that has been implicated in cancer but has not been a target of drug research because it is involved in so much of normal cell processes. It has seemed impossible to halt its bad behavior without inhibiting its good behavior. They tracked down its impact on cells believed to be cancer stem cells and found the pathway it uses for that effect. So, future teams can target this pathway rather than FGF itself and its many roles.

“If we understand how to keep these cells dormant it means that although we may have to live with the presence of cancer stem cells, we can prevent them from causing the cancer to come back,” said one of the study lead authors, Fen Wang. “That’s what we are trying to understand. That is the future of cancer therapy.”

The NewsMedical web portal picked up the university’s release about the research published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry.  CIRM funds several teams trying to thwart cancer stem cells both in blood cancers and in solid tumors.

 

Safer bone marrow transplant. The most common stem cell therapy, commonly called bone marrow transplant, has a more than three-decade record of success treating cancer patients. As doctors have grown more comfortable with the procedure, they expanded its use beyond using a person’s own stem cells and stem cells from immunologically well-matched donors to using cells from only partially matched donors. As this has increased the number of lives saved it has also increased the number of patients put at risk for the horrible complication known as graft versus host disease (GVHD). Besides being painful and debilitating, GVHD frequently ends in death.

A team at Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center completed a genetic analysis of transplant patients that did and did not develop GVHD. They found a specific gene marker that increases the risk of the complication by more than 50 percent and the risk of death by 25 percent. The results should push physicians with patients who have the at-risk gene to search harder for a matching donor before they resort to a mismatched transplant.

“Our data provide new information on the role of HLA-DPB1 expression in transplantation associated risks that can be used to guide the selection of donors for future transplant recipients in order to minimize the risk of acute GVHD,” said Effie Petersdorf, one the study authors in an article in MEDPAGETODAY.

The study appears in this week’s New England Journal of Medicine, but anyone who does not want to climb the journal’s pay wall, can get considerable more detail in the MEDPAGE article written by a former colleague from my days editing a national medical magazine, Charles Bankhead. You can trust Charlie to get the story right.

 

Using evolution science to improve gene therapy. The field of gene therapy—providing a correct copy of a gene to someone born with a mutation or using a gene to deliver a desired protein—is finally starting to take off. But one of the oldest tools for getting desired genes into cells, a family of viruses called adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) has serious limitations when trying to directly deliver the gene into people. Most of us have been infected with various AAVs and developed immunity to them. So, our immune system may wipe out the virus carrying the desired payload before it can deliver its goods.

Many teams have developed various forms of AAV that help a bit; making the viruses a little less likely to be recognized. Now, a team at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute has taken a major step down that path using evolutionary science. They used existing records of how the virus has changed over time to construct surface proteins that would not be recognized by the immune systems of most people alive today. Bionity.com wrote about the research that appeared in the journal Cell Reports.

 

ear on arm jpegListen up for the week’s oddest story. An Australian performance artist who goes by the name Stelarc has worked with a team of surgeons to grow an ear on his forearm, which he intends to implant with a microphone connected to the internet so followers of his art can hear what he hears 24/7. Not surprisingly, his family is a little skeptical.

Surgeons built the main part of the ear by implanting a scaffold made from standard materials used in plastic surgery and the artist’s own cells populated it with blood vessels and other tissues. But to grow the exterior ear lobe he intends to work with a team using stem cells, which is why this story appeared in my news feed dozens of times this week.

CNN Style did one of the most thorough write-ups including a good discussion of the ethics of wasting valuable time of medical professionals, something Stelarc himself discussed. He concluded that the value grew from getting the science world and art world to intermingle and better understand each other, something that has been on our soapbox for years.

“But I’ve found there’s a lot of goodwill from people who ordinarily would not have contact with an artist, and ordinarily would not see the reason for wasting time and money and their expertise on doing something like this, and that’s heartening,” Stelarc said.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: potentially safer cell reprogramming, hair follicle cells become nerve and liver stem cells

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

A potentially safer way to reprogram cells. Ever since then soon-to-be Nobel Prize winner Shinya Yamanaka showed how to reprogram adult cells to an embryonic stem cell-like state labs around the world have jumped on that band wagon. But many of their experiments have not just been using those cells but rather looking for ways to make them more efficiently and possibly safer for clinical use.

The four “Yamanaka factors” traditionally used to make what are now called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) include genes that can induce cancer. So, folks have been justifiably nervous about using cells derived from iPSCs in patients.

Today in the journal Science two different Chinese teams report slightly different methods of using only chemicals to reprogram skin cells directly into nerves. One team worked at the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences and the other worked at Peking University.

“In comparison with using transgenic reprogramming factors, the small molecules that are used in this chemical approach are cell permeable; cost-effective; and easy to synthesize, preserve, and standardize; and their effects can be reversible,” Hongkui Deng of the Peking team said in a press release used to write a piece in the International Business Times.

 

Stem cells in hair follicles may repair nerve. The base of our hair follicles contains skin stem cells as you would expect, but it also contains cells with markers suggesting they come from the area of the embryo known as the neural crest. A team at the University of Newcastle in the U.K. tested those cells to see if they have stem cell properties and they do.

They were able to use those cells to create Schwann cells, support cells that our bodies use to repair nerves and help with certain systems like sensation. The team’s Schwann cells interacted with nerve cells in lab dishes the way natural cells do in the body.

“We observed that the bulge, a region within hair follicles, contains skin stem cells that are intermixed with cells derived from the neural crest – a tissue known to give rise to Schwann cells,” said Maya Sieber-Blum, in a university press release picked up by Yahoo. “This observation raised the question whether these neural crest-derived cells are also stem cells and whether they could be used to generate Schwann cells.”

They showed that the cells can indeed become Schwann cells. The researchers now want to see if their cells can repair nerve damage in an animal model.

Prior work at Stanford had turned embryonic stem cells into liver cells.

Prior work at Stanford had turned embryonic stem cells into liver cells.

Drink up. Liver stem cells found. The liver creates new liver cells quite readily, whether damaged by alcohol or other factors. But no one has known exactly where the new cells come from, with most researchers assuming the remaining health cells divide to create new tissue. But a team at Stanford suggested that the liver works too hard for that to be the case. In order to remove all the toxins that come its way adult liver cells have amplified certain chromosomes, and team leader Roel Nusse said that would make them unable to divide and create new cells.

So, his team set out to track down previously elusive liver stem cells. They bred mice that had cells that would have a green florescent glow if they carried a protein usually found only on stem cells. They indeed did find stem cells and tracked them as the animals matured and saw them both divide to create more stem cells and mature into adult liver cells.

“We’ve solved a very old problem,” said Nusse, who is a Howard Hughes investigator. “We’ve shown that like other tissues that need to replace lost cells, the liver has stem cells that both proliferate and give rise to mature cells, even in the absence of injury or disease.”

The Hughes Institute issued a press release and the International Business Times wrote the story and illustrated it with a photo from CIRM’s Flickr site.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: Prostate cancer and BPA, mini organs and diabetes trial

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Latest mini-organ, a prostate, fingers BPA. A team at the University of Illinois, at Chicago, has added the prostate gland to the growing list of “organoids” that have been grown from stem cells in the lab. The tiny gland that produces semen in men has an unusually high rate of cancer compared to other organs. Prior research has linked that cancerous nature to exposure to the hormone estrogen during fetal growth, including synthetic estrogen mimics like the chemical BPA (bisphenol A) found in many plastics.

Unlike the other organs associated with male gender, which form very early in fetal development, the prostate develops later when stem cells’ roles are more narrowly defined to creating specific tissues. The team, led by Gail Prins, had previously shown that prostate stem cells grown in the presence of BPA formed cells more likely to show signs of cancer. But that did not allow them to determine what really triggered the increase in cancer. So, they decided to grow mini prostates and look at all the cells as they developed in the organoid.

“What we were doing originally with the human prostate stem cells is we were mixing and growing them in vivo,” Prins told Medical Daily. “The idea to generate this organoid came from the first author, Esther Calderon-Gierszal; she was my graduate student. ‘They’ve done it for other organs,’ she thought. ‘Let’s try it for a prostate.’”

The researchers pushed embryonic stem cells to grow into the several different tissues found in a prostate gland using a cocktail of hormones. Although much smaller than a normal prostate the cells did self-organize into structures that resembled the gland. When they grew the organoid in the presence of BPA they found an unusually large number of prostate specific stem cells. So, it appears just the increased number of stem cells increases the likelihood a few will go bad and form cancer.

A round up of all the mini-organs. The journal Nature has written a very accessible wrap up in its news section on all the various organs that have been simulated in a lab dish since a Japanese team reported the phenomenon for the first time in 2008. After a fun lead-in explaining the science, Cassandra Willyard runs through what has been accomplished so far in the stomach, kidney, and liver.

Part of a miniature stomach grown in the lab, stained to reveal various cells found in normal human stomachs [Credit: Kyle McCracken]

Part of a miniature stomach grown in the lab, stained to reveal various cells found in normal human stomachs [Credit: Kyle McCracken]

The fun in the opening section comes from the fact that given the right environment, stem cells are pretty darn good at self-organizing into the multiple tissue types that become a specific organ. So much so, that the early teams that saw it in the lab were shocked and did not at first know what they had.

Willyard starts with quotes from Madeline Lancaster, a post-doctoral fellow in a lab at the Institute for Molecular Biotechnology in Vienna, Austria. She found milky looking spheres in the lab cultures and when she cut into them she found multiple types of nerves. So she grabbed her mentor and reported:

“I’ve got something amazing. You’ve got to see it.”

She also discusses the work that led Hans Clevers, a researcher at Hubrecht Institute in Utrecht, the Netherlands, to report the creation of mini-guts in 20009. They grew the cells in a gel that resembled the structure that naturally surrounds cells. In this “at-home” environment stem cells formed much more complex tissue than he had hoped.

“The structures, to our total astonishment, looked like real guts,” Clevers said. “They were beautiful.”

The author also lets Clevers talk about taking his work the next step, using the gut organoids to screen for drugs for related diseases. If you have been following this work, Willyard’s piece is a must read.

Second clinical trial site for diabetes. Opening multiple clinical trial sites accelerates the process of determining whether a new therapy is safe and effective. So we were thrilled to get the announcement from ViaCyte that they would begin enrolling patients at a second location for the diabetes trial we helped them launch by funding the first clinical trial site at the University of California, San Diego.

That trial uses pancreatic cells grown from embryonic stem cells that are protected from immune attack by a semi-permeable pouch. The second site, at the University of Alberta Hospitals in Edmonton, Canada, is being funded in part by Alberta Innovates as well as by the JDRF Canadian Clinical Trials Network. JDRF also helps support the San Diego trial through its US office.

The lead researcher for the Alberta trial, James Shapiro, developed the procedure for transplanting pancreatic tissue from cadavers that became known as “the Edmonton Protocol.” That protocol has changed many lives, but because it requires life-long immunosuppression, doctors only recommend it for the most severe diabetics. The small number of donor pancreases also limits its use. Shapiro commented about the value and need for something like the ViaCyte therapy in a company press release picked up by Yahoo Finance, and dozens of other sites:

“The fact remains that new treatments are sorely needed, not only for the high risk patients but for all patients suffering from this life-altering disease.  The remarkable promise of the (ViaCyte) product candidate is that a virtually limitless source of appropriate human cells can be transplanted without the need for lifetime immunosuppression.”

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: fixing defects we got from mom, lung repair and staunching chronic nerve pain

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Two ways to clean up mitochondrial defects. Every student gets it drilled into them that we get half our genes from mom and half from dad, but that is not quite right. Mom’s egg contains a few genes outside the nucleus in the so-called powerhouse of the cell, the mitochondria that we inherit only from mom. The 13 little genes in that tiny organelle that are responsible for energy use can wreak havoc when they are mutated. Now, a multi-center team working in Oregon and California has developed two different ways to create stem cells that match the DNA of specific patients in everyway except those defective mitochondrial genes.

The various mitochondrial mutations tend to impact one body system more than others. The end goal for the current research is to turn those stem cells into healthy tissue that can be transplanted into the area most impacted by the disease in a specific patient. That remains some years away, but this is a huge step in providing therapies for this group of diseases.

Currently, we have two ways of making stem cells that match the DNA of a patient, which hopefully result in transplantable cells that can avoid immune rejection. One is to reprogram adult tissue into induced pluripotent (iPS type) stem cells and the other uses the techniques called Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT), often called therapeutic cloning. The current research did both.

The team converted the SCNT stem cells into various needed tissues such as these nerve precursor cells.

The team converted the SCNT stem cells into various needed tissues such as these nerve precursor cells.

The iPS work relied on the fact that our tissues are mosaics because of the way mitochondria get passed on when cells divide. So not all cells show mitochondrial mutations in people with “mito disease” —how impacted families tend to refer to it, as I found out through a distant cousin with a child valiantly struggling with one form of the disease. Because each iPS stem cell line arises from one cell, the researchers could do DNA analysis on each cell line and sort for ones with few or no mutations, resulting in healthy stem cells, which could become healthy transplant tissue.

But for some patients, there are just too many mutations. For those the researchers inserted the DNA from the patient into a healthy donor egg containing healthy mitochondria using SCNT. The result: again healthy stem cells.

“To families with a loved one born with a mitochondrial disease waiting for a cure, today we can say that a cure is on the horizon,” explained co-senior author Shoukhrat Mitalipov at the Oregon Stem Cell Center in a story in Genetic Engineering News. “This critical first step toward treating these diseases using gene therapy will put us on the path to curing them and unlike unmatched tissue or organ donations, combined gene and cell therapy will allow us to create the patients’ own healthy tissue that will not be rejected by their bodies.”

ScienceDaily ran the Oregon press release, HealthCanal ran the press release from the Salk Institute in La Jolla home of the other co-senior author Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, whose lab CIRM funds for other projects. And Reuters predictably did a piece with a bit more focus on the controversy around cloning. Nature published the research paper on Wednesday.

Stem cells to heal damaged lungs. Lung doctors dealing with emphysema, cystic fibrosis and other lung damage may soon take a page from the playbook of cancer doctors who transplant bone marrow stem cells. A team at Israel’s Weizmann Institute has tested a similar procedure in mice with damaged lungs and saw improved lung function

Transplanted lung cells continued to grow at six weeks (left) and 16 weeks (right).

Transplanted lung cells continued to grow at six weeks (left) and 16 weeks (right).

Stem cells are homebodies. They tend to hang out in their own special compartments we call the stem cell niche, and if infused elsewhere in the body will return home to the niche. Bone marrow transplants make use of that tendency in two ways. Doctors wipe out the stem cells in the niche so that there is room there when stem cells previously harvested from the patient or donor cells are infused after therapy.

The Weizmann team did this in the lungs by developing a method to clear out the lung stem cell niche and isolating a source of stem cells capable of generating new lung tissue that could be infused. They now need to perfect both parts of the procedure. ScienceDaily ran the institute’s press release.

Stem cells for chronic pain due to nerve damage. Neuropathy, damaged nerves caused by diabetes, chemotherapy or injury tends to cause pain that resists treatment. A team at Duke University in North Carolina has shown that while a routine pain pill might provide relief for a few hours, a single injection of stem cells provided relief for four to five weeks—in mice.

They used a type of stem cell found in bone marrow known to have anti-inflammatory properties called Bone Marrow Stromal Cells (BMSCs). They infused the cells directly into the spinal cavity in mice that had induced nerve damage. They found that one chemical released by the stem cells, TGF Beta1, was present in the spinal fluid of the treated animals at higher than normal levels. This finding becomes a target for further research to engineer the BMSCs so that they might be even better at relieving pain. ScienceNewsline picked up the Duke press release about the research published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: correcting cystic fibrosis gene, improving IVF outcome, growing bone and Dolly

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Cystic Fibrosis gene corrected in stem cells. A team at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston corrected the defective gene that causes cystic fibrosis in stem cells made from the skin of cystic fibrosis patients. In the long term the advance could make it possible to grow new lungs for patients with genes that match their own—with one life-saving exception—and therefore avoid immune rejection. But, the short-term outcome will be a model for the disease that provides tools for evaluating potential new drug therapies.

“We’ve created stem cells corrected for the cystic fibrosis mutation that potentially could be utilized therapeutically for patients,” said Brian Davis the study’s senior author in a university press release. “While much work remains, it is possible that these cells could one day be used as a form of cell therapy.”

The researchers made the genetic correction in the stem cells using the molecular scissors known as zing finger nucleases. Essentially they cut out the bad gene and pasted in the correct version.

Stem cell researchers boost IVF. Given all the ethical issues raised in the early years of embryonic stem cell research it is nice to be able to report on work in the field that can boost the chances of creating a new life through in vitro fertilization (IVF). Building on earlier work at Stanford a CIRM-funded team there has developed a way to detect chromosome abnormalities in the embryo within 30 hours of fertilization.

Chromosomal abnormalities account for a high percent of the 60 to 70 percent of implanted embryos that end up in miscarriage. But traditional methods can’t detect those chromosomal errors until day five or six and clinicians have found that embryos implant best three to four days post fertilization. This new technique should allow doctors to implant only the embryos most likely to survive.

“A failed IVF attempt takes an emotional toll on a woman who is anticipating a pregnancy as well as a financial toll on families, with a single IVF treatment costing thousands and thousands of dollars per cycle. Our findings also bring hope to couples who are struggling to start a family and wish to avoid the selection and transfer of embryos with unknown or poor potential for implantation,” explained Shawn Chavez who led the team and has since moved to Oregon Health Sciences University.

The study, which used recent advanced technology in non-invasive imaging, was described in a press release from Oregon.

Fun TED-Ed video shows how to grow bone. Medical Daily published a story this week about a team that had released a TED-Ed video earlier this month on how to grow a replacement bone on the lab. The embedded video provides a great primer on how we normally grow and repair bone in our bodies and how that knowledge can inform efforts to grow bone in the lab.

In particular, the story walks through a scenario of a patient with a bone defect too large for our normal repair mechanisms to patch up. It describes how scientist can take stem cells from fat, use 3D printers to mold a scaffold the exact shape of the defect, and culture the stem cells on the scaffold in the lab to create the needed bone.

The video and story reflect the work of New York-based company EpiBone and its tissue engineer CEO Nina Tandon.

Happy birthday Dolly (the sheep). July 5 marked the 19th anniversary of the first cloned mammal, Dolly the sheep in Scotland. For fans of the history of science, MotherBoard gives a good brief history of the resulting kerfuffle and a reminder that Dolly was not very healthy and the procedure was not and is not ready to produce cloned human.

Dolly's taxidermied remains are in a museum in Scotland. She died after only six years, about half the normal life expectancy.

Dolly’s taxidermied remains are in a museum in Scotland. She died after only six years, about half the normal life expectancy.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: Immune therapy for HIV, nerves grown on diamonds and how stem cells talk

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Trendy CAR T therapy tried on HIV.  The hottest trend in cancer therapy today is using CAR-T cells to attack and rid the body of cancer. Technically called chimeric antigen receptors the technology basically provides our own immune system with directions to cancer cells and keys to get inside them and destroy them. A CIRM-funded team at the University of California, Los Angeles, has now tried that same scheme with HIV.

Jerome Zack (left) and Scott Kitchen, found that the technique decreased HIV levels in mice by 80 to 95 percent.

Jerome Zack (left) and Scott Kitchen, found that the technique decreased HIV levels in mice by 80 to 95 percent.

The researchers worked with mice bred to have a human immune system so that HIV affects them similarly to humans. They harvested their blood-forming stem cells and inserted a CAR that recognized HIV. After giving the stem cells back to the mice they produced T cells capable of seeking out and destroying about 90 percent of the virus. The technique has a ways to go, but the study’s lead author noted their ultimate goal in a University press release picked up by HealthCanal:

“We hope this approach could one day allow HIV-positive individuals to reduce or even stop their current HIV drug regimen and clear the virus from the body altogether,” said Scott Kitchen. “We also think this approach could possibly be extended to other diseases.”

Nerves grown on diamonds. Diamonds are so chemically non-reactive our bodies would not recognize them as foreign. But they can also be made to conduct electricity, which could make nerves grown on their surface able to be turned on and off with electrical impulses. When developing cell therapy for several neurologic diseases the ability to control the activity of replacement cells could be critical to success—making new research by a team in Britain and Ireland intriguing, if very preliminary.

They doped diamonds with boron to make them able to conduct electricity and then used them as a surface for growing nerve stem cells that could later be turned into nerves. They then succeeded in growing nerves long term on the diamonds.

“We still have a lot more fundamental studies of the neuron/diamond interface to perform,” said Paul May of the University of Bristol. “[But] the long term possibilities for this work are exciting.  Long-lifetime diamond bio-implants may offer treatments for Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, stroke or even epilepsy.”

Materials Today wrote a piece explaining the work.

Some stem cells talk over “land lines.” Most cellular communication works through chemical signals that get dispatched by one cell and received by others. It turns out that some types of stem cells communicate by sending out tiny nanotubes, sort of a cellular land line.

A team at the University of Michigan and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center found the new form of communication working with fruit flies. Yukiko Yamashita, a senior author of the paper from Michigan explained why it is so important to get a better understanding of cell-to-cell communication in a university press release picked up by ScienceNewsline:

“There are trillions of cells in the human body, but nowhere near that number of signaling pathways. There’s a lot we don’t know about how the right cells get just the right messages to the right recipients at the right time.”

In a classic example of the beauty of young minds in science, prior images of these stem cells had shown the nanotubes, but they had been overlooked until a graduate student asked what they were.

Phase 3 melanoma trial explained. When a new therapy gets into its third and final phase of testing it is make or break for the company developing the therapy and for patients who hope it will become broadly available. CIRM recently provided funding to our first phase three clinical trial, one aimed at metastatic melanoma being conducted by Caladrius Biosciences.

The CEO of the company, David Mazzo, gave an interview with The New Economy this week that does a nice job of explaining the goal of the therapy and how it is different from other therapies currently used or being developed. The therapy’s main difference is its ability to target the cancer-inducing cells thought to responsible for the spread of the disease.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: Parkinson’s in a dish, synthetic blood, tracking Huntington’s and cloning

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

3D nerve model for Parkinson’s. The wave of successes in making more complex tissues in three dimensional lab cultures continues this week with a team in Luxembourg creating nerves from stem cells derived from Parkinson’s patients that assembled into complex connections in the lab.

Nerve cells made from skin cells. Credit: Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB), 2015

Nerve cells made from skin cells. Credit: Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB), 2015

The name of the journal where the group published their results, Lab on a Chip, says a lot about where the field is going. While many have grown the dopamine-producing nerves lost in Parkinson’s disease in two dimensional cultures, the new technique better replicates the disease state and does it about 10-fold cheaper because the 3D bioreactors used can be automated and use less of the reagents needed to grow the cells and to tell them to become the right nerves.

They started with skin samples from patients and reprogrammed them into iPS-type stem cells. After those cells are placed in the vessel, they are matured into 90 percent pure dopamine-nerves. At that point they are ideal for testing potential drugs for any impact on the disease. The senior researcher, Ronan Fleming, explained the benefit in a press release from the University of Luxembourg, picked up by ScienceDaily:

“In drug development, dozens of chemical substances can therefore be tested for possible therapeutic effects in a single step. Because we use far smaller amounts of substances than in conventional cell culture systems, the costs drop to about one tenth the usual.”

Synthetic blood from stem cells. Making synthetic blood, particularly for people with rare blood types for which there are few donors, has long been a goal of science. Now, the British National Health Service (NHS) says it expects to begin giving patients at least one component of lab-made blood—red cells—by 2017.

Starting with adult stem cells grown in just the right solution they hope to produce large quantities of red blood cells. Initially they plan to give only small quantities to healthy individuals with rare blood types to compare them to donor blood.

“These trials will compare manufactured cells with donated blood,” said Nick Warkins of the NHS. “The intention is not to replace blood donation but provide specialist treatment for specific patient groups.”

The story got wide pick up in the British press including in the Daily Mail and in several web portals including Rocket News.

Tracking Huntington’s spread in the brain. A CIRM-funded team at the University of California, Irvine, has developed a way to track the spread of the mutant protein responsible for progression of Huntington’s disease. They were able to accurately detect the mutant protein in cerebrospinal fluid and distinguish between people who carried the mutation but were pre-symptomatic from those that had advanced disease.

The protein appears to be released by diseased cells and migrates to other cells, seeding additional damage there. Measuring levels of the protein should allow physicians to monitor progression of the disease ahead of symptoms.

“Determining if a treatment modifies the course of a neurodegenerative disease like Huntington’s or Alzheimer’s may take years of clinical observation,” said study leader Dr. Steven Potkin. “This assay that reflects a pathological process can play a key role in more rapidly developing an effective treatment. Blocking the cell-to-cell seeding process itself may turn out to be an effective treatment strategy.”

Medical News Today wrote up the research that the team published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

Good overview of cloning. Writing for Medical Daily, Dana Dovey has produced a good overview of the history of cloning, and more important, the reasons why reproductive cloning of human is not likely to happen any time soon.

She describes the important role a number of variations on cloning play in scientific research, and the potential to create personalized cells for patients through a process known as therapeutic cloning. But she also describes the many problems with reproductive cloning as it is practiced in animals. It is very inefficient with dozens of eggs failing to mature and often results in animals that have flaws. She quotes Robert Lanza of Advanced Cell Technologies (now Ocata Therapeutics):

“It’s like sending your baby up in a rocket knowing there’s a 50-50 chance it’s going to blow up. It’s grossly unethical.”

 

Hed: Stem cell stories that caught our eye: the why’s of heart failure, harnessing stem cells’ repair kits and growing organs

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Stem cell model sheds light on heat failure. Pretty much everyone who has heart failure due to cardiomyopathy—where the heart muscle doesn’t work as effectively as it should—or has a condition that could lead there, is taking a beta blocker. The beta-andrenergic pathway, a key molecular pathway in the heart, dysfunctions in patients with cardiomyopathy and we have never known exactly why. We just know these drugs help.

Now, a team at Stanford led by Joseph Wu has used skin samples from patients and normal subjects to create reprogrammed iPS type stem cells, grown them into heart muscle, and compared them at a very fine-tuned molecular level.

Some patients have a mutation in a protein called TNNT2 in heart muscle fibers, which regulates muscle contraction. So, one thing they looked at was the impact of that mutation. Wu’s team followed the actions triggered by this mutation and found they lead to the beta-andrenergic pathway. Wu explained the value he sees in this fundamental understanding of the disease in a Stanford press release:

“As a cardiologist, I feel this basic research study is very clinically relevant. The beta-andrenergic pathway is a major pharmaceutical target for many cardiac conditions. This study confirms that iPS-cell-derived cardiomyocytes can help us understand biologically important pathways at a molecular level, which can aid in drug screening.”

CIRM did not fund this project but we do fund other projects in Wu’s lab including one to advance the use of iPS cells as models of heart disease, one using tissue engineering to repair damaged areas of the heart and one using embryonic stem cells to generate new heart muscle.

Harnessing stem cells’ repair kits. Stem cells repair tissue in multiple ways, but primarily by maturing into cells that replace damaged ones or by excreting various chemicals that give marching orders to neighboring cells to get busy and make the repairs. Those chemicals, collectively called paracrine factors, get excreted by the stem cells in vessels known as exosomes. So, a team at Temple University in Philadelphia decided to try injecting just the exosomes, rather than whole stem cells to repair heart damage. It seemed to work pretty well in mice.

Stem cells release exosomes, tiny vessels that act as repair kits.

Stem cells release exosomes, tiny vessels that act as repair kits.


After treatment with the exosomes, mice with induced heart attacks showed fewer heart cells dying, less scar tissue, more development of new blood vessels and a stronger heart function. The head of the Temple team, Raj Kishore, described the result in a university press release distributed by EuekaAlert:

“You can robustly increase the heart’s ability to repair itself without using the stem cells themselves. Our work shows a unique way to regenerate the heart using secreted vesicles from embryonic stem cells.”

The team went on to isolate a specific regulatory chemical that was among the most abundant in the exosomes. That compound, a type of RNA, produced much of the same results when administered by itself to the mice—intriguing results for further study.

Good primer on using stem cells to grow organs. The Wisconsin State Journal ran a nice primer in both video and prose about what would theoretically go into building a replacement organ from stem cells and some of the basic stem cell principals involved. The piece is part of a series the paper produces with the Morgridge Institute at the University of Wisconsin. This one features an interview with Michael Treiman of Epic Systems:

“The biggest challenge right now is that we can push a stem cell to be a particular type of cell, but in a tissue there’s multiple cells. And an organ like your heart or brain isn’t just made of one cell type; it’s made of many cell types working together.”