Stem cell stories that caught our eye; creating bone, turning data into sound, cord blood and path of a stem cell star

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

A better ratio of bone to fat
. Most of us at any age would prefer a little less fat and older folks, particularly ones plagued by the bone loss of osteoporosis, could use a bit more bone. Since both types of tissues come from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) a team at the University of Miami decided to look for chemical triggers that tells those stem cells whether to become fat or bone.

They found an enzyme that seems to do just that. In mice that were born with a mutation in the gene for that enzyme they saw increased bone growth, less fat production and a leaner body mass. HealthCanal picked up the university’s press release that quoted the leader of the team Joshua Hare:

“The production of bone could have a profound effect on the quality of life for the aging population.”

He goes on to note that there are many hurdles to cross before this becomes a therapeutic reality, but the current work points to lots of potential.

Path to becoming a star stem cell scientist. D, the city magazine for Dallas, published a lengthy—nearly 4,000-word—feature on Sean Morrison, one of the undisputed leaders of our field. While it starts out talking about his latest role of creating a multi-pronged center for innovation at

Sean Morrison

Sean Morrison

Children’s Medical Center Dallas and UT Southwestern, it spends most of its words on how he got there.

It’s fun reading how someone gets into a field as new as stem cell science and what keeps them in the field. Initially, for him it seems to originate from an immense curiosity about what was not known about the powerful little stem cells.

“Fifteen years ago, there was nothing known at the molecular level about how stem cells replicate. And I really felt it was a fundamental question in biology to understand. It was a question that was central to a lot of important issues, because the ability of stem cells to self-renew is critical to form your tissues throughout development, to maintain your tissues throughout adulthood.”

There is also a good retelling of Morrison’s role in the protracted and hard-fought battle to make embryonic stem cell research legal during his years in Michigan. He started working on the campaign to overturn the ban in 2006 and in 2008 the voters agreed. The article makes a compelling case for something I have advocated for years: scientists need to practice speaking for the public and get out and do it.

Turning stem cell data into sound. Interpreting scientific data through sound, sonification, is a bit trendy now. But the concept is quite old. Think of the Geiger counter and the speed of the click changing based on the level of radiation.

Researchers tend to consider sonification when dealing with large data sets that have some level of repetitive component. Following the differentiation of a large number of stem cells as they mature into different types of tissue could lend itself to the genre and a team at Cardiff University in Scotland reports they have succeeded. In doing just that.

HealthCanal picked up the university’s piece talking about the project. Unfortunately it does a very poor job of explaining how the process actually works. I did find this piece on ocean microbes that describes the concept of sonification of data pretty well.

Cord blood poised for greater use. I get very uncomfortable when friends ask for medical advice around stem cells. I usually try to give a lay of the land that comes short of direct advice. A common question centers on the value of paying the annual storage fees to freeze their baby’s cord blood. To which, I typically say that for current uses the value is marginal, but for the uses that could come in five to 10 years, it could be quite significant.

So, it was not surprising to read a headline on a Scientific American Blog last December reading “Vast Majority of Life-Saving Cord Blood Sits Unused.” But it was also fun to read a well-documented counter point guest blog on the site this morning by our former President, Alan Trounson. He suggested a better headline would be: “Vast Majority of Life-Saving Cord Blood Sits Poised for Discovery.”

He details how cord blood has become a valuable research tool and lists some of the FDA-approved clinical trials that could greatly expand the indication of cord blood therapy. While some of those trials will likely produce negative results, some will succeed and they all will start to show how to turn those frozen vials into a more valuable resource.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye; cystic fibrosis, brain repair and Type 2 diabetes

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

“Organoids” screen for cystic fibrosis drugs
. Starting with iPS-type stem cells made by reprogramming skin cells from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients a team at the University of Cambridge in the U.K. created mini lungs in a dish. These organoids should provide a great tool for screening drugs to treat the disease.

The researchers pushed the stem cells to go through the early stages of embryo development and then on to become 3-D distal airway tissue, the part of the lung that processes gas exchange. They were able to use a florescent marker to show an aspect of the cells’ function that was different in cells from CF patients and those from normal individuals. When they treated the CF cells with a drug that is being tested in CF patients, they saw the function correct to the normal state.

Bioscience Technology
picked up the university’s press release about the work published in the journal Stem Cells and Development. It quotes the scientist who led the study, Nick Hannon, on the application of the new tool:

“We’re confident this process could be scaled up to enable us to screen tens of thousands of compounds and develop mini-lungs with other diseases such as lung cancer and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.”

To repair a brain knock its “pinky” down. A team at the University of California, San Francisco, has discovered a molecule that when it is shut down nerve stem cells can produce a whole lot more nerves. They call the molecule Pnky, named after the cartoon Pinky and the Brain.

Pinky_and_the_Brain_vol1Pkny belongs to a set of molecules known as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which researchers are finding are more abundant and more important than originally thought. The most familiar RNAs are the intermediary molecules between the DNA in our genes and the proteins that let our cells function. Initially, all the noncoding RNAs were thought to have no function, but in recent years many have been found to have critical roles in determining which genes are active. And Pnky seems to tamp down the activity of nerve stem cells. In a university press release picked up by HealthCanal Daniel Lim, the head researcher explained what happens when they shut down the gene:

“It is remarkable that when you take Pnky away, the stem cells produce many more neurons. These findings suggest that Pnky, and perhaps lncRNAs in general, could eventually have important applications in regenerative medicine and cancer treatment.”

Lim went onto explain the cancer connection. Since Pnky binds to a protein found in brain tumors, it might be involved in regulating the growth of brain tumors. A lot more work needs to happen before that hunch—or the use of Pnky blockers in brain injury—can lead to therapies, but this study certainly paints an intriguing path forward.

Stem cells and Type 2 diabetes. A few teams have succeeded in using stem cells to produce insulin-secreting tissue to correct Type 1 diabetes in animals, but it has been uncertain if the procedure would work for Type 2 diabetes. Type 1 is marked by a lack of insulin production, while resistance to the body’s own insulin, not lack of insulin, is the hallmark of type 2. A team at the University of British Columbia has new data showing stem cell therapy may indeed have a place in treating Type 2.

In mice fed a high fat diet until they developed the symptoms of Type 2 diabetes the stem cell-derived cells did help, but they did not fully correct the metabolism of the mice until they added one of the drugs commonly used to treat diabetes today. The drugs alone, also did not restore normal metabolism, which is often the case with human Type 2 diabetics.

The combination of drugs and cells improved the mice’s sugar metabolism, body weight and insulin sensitivity. The research appeared in the journal Stem Cell Reports and the University’s press release was picked up by several outlets including Fox News.

They transplanted cells from humans and even though the mice were immune suppressed, they took the added measure of protecting the cells in an encapsulation device. They noted that this would be required for use in humans and showing that it worked in mice would speed up any human trials. They also gave a shout out to the clinical trial CIRM funds at Viacyte, noting that since the Food and Drug Administration has already approved use of a similar device by Viacyte, the work might gain more rapid approval.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye; drug screening, aging stem cells in brain repair and blood diseases

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Heart-on-a-chip used to screen drugs. With CIRM funding, a team at the University of California, Berkeley, has used stem cell technology to create a virtual heart on an inch-long piece of silicon. The cells in that “chip” mimic the physiology of a human heart and have shown that they can accurately show how drugs will impact the heart.
HeartChip4196107801
Starting with iPS-type stem cells made from reprogramming adult cells the researchers grew them into heart muscle that could beat and align in multiple layers with microscopic channels that mimic blood vessels. They tested three drugs currently used to treat heart disease and found the changes seen in the heart-on-a-chip were consistent with what is seen in patients. For example, they tested isoproterenol, a drug used to treat slow heart rate and saw a dramatic increase in heart rate.

But the real value in the silicon-housed heart will be in screening potential new drugs and finding out adverse impacts before taking them into costly human clinical trials. Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News wrote up the work and quoted a member of the team, Kevin Healy:

“It takes about $5 billion on average to develop a drug, and 60 percent of that figure comes from upfront costs in the research and development phase. Using a well-designed model of a human organ could significantly cut the cost and time of bringing a new drug to market.”

Brain stem cell activity decreases with age. We have known for some time that the adult stem cells that reside in most of our tissues and spend our lives repairing those tissues are less effective as we age. But the stemness of those cells—their ability to regenerate themselves—has not generally been questioned, rather we have assumed they just lost some of their ability to mature into the type of cell needed to make the repair.

Now, a team at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat in Munich has published data suggesting that brain stem cells over time loose both their ability to renew themselves and some of their ability to become certain kinds of nerves. ScienceDaily picked up a press release from the institution and it quoted one of the authors, Magdalena Gotz, on the implications of their finding for therapy.

“In light of the fact that the stem cell supply is limited, we must now also look for ways to promote the self-renewal rate of the stem cells themselves and maintain the supply for a longer time.”

Another alternative for correcting genetic blood disease. CIRM funds a few programs that are trying to treat blood diseases such as sickle cell anemia and beta thalassemia by genetically altering blood forming stem cells. The goal being to correct defects in the gene for hemoglobin, the protein that carries oxygen in red blood cells.

Instead of starting with a patient’s own blood stem cells, which can require a somewhat traumatic harvest procedure, a new approach by a team at the Salk Institute in La Jolla creates iPS type stem cells by reprogramming the cells in a small skin sample. They mature those into blood stem cells and genetically modify them so that they can produce red blood cells that have the correct hemoglobin.

The Salk team uses a modified cold virus to carry the gene into the cell. ScienceDaily picked up the institute’s press release, which quotes one of the co-first authors on the study Mo Li on how the process works:

“It happens naturally, working like a zipper. The good gene just zips in perfectly, pushing the bad one out.”

CIRM funds other work by the senior author, Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, but not this project. Because you never know which technology is going to work out best in the long term, it is nice to see other funders stepping up and pushing this alternative forward.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye; Parkinson’s, drug boosts stem cells in MS and gender equity in science

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Stem cells survive and aid Parkinson’s in monkey.
Ole Isacson, a pioneer in the effort to figure out how to use stem cells to treat Parkinson’s Disease, has published new research that suggests a good option. His Harvard team used nerves grown from reprogrammed iPS type stem cells created from the monkey’s own skin.

Dopamine producing nerves created from skin cells of primates

Dopamine producing nerves created from skin cells of primates

His earlier efforts using nerves grown from embryonic stem cells did not result in production of the dopamine that Parkinson’s patients need. He speculates that this was because they were donor cells and required immune suppression to avoid rejection. With the iPS-derived nerves no immune suppressants were needed and the cells survived two years and reversed much of the Parkinson’s symptoms in the one animal that got that type of cell.

ScienceBlog picked up the university’s press release, which described the therapeutic benefit this way:

Isacson said the conclusion of this experiment marks “the first time that an animal has recovered to the same activity level he had before.” He noted that the animal was “able to move as fast around its home cage” as an animal without Parkinson’s, and had normal agility, though individual motions were still slowed by the disease.

He also cautioned that it would be at least three years before he could do the experiments needed to prove the procedure was safe enough to use in patients.

Nerve cells for memory created from stem cells.
The cerebral cortex is the most complex part of our brains. This large outer layer processes memory, vision and language. Its complexity has always given researcher pause in thinking about ways to use stem cells to repair damage in it. Now, an international team working in Belgium and France has grown cortex nerves in the lab, transplanted them in mice with damaged cortices and seen the nerves survive and integrate into the healthy neighboring tissue.

In these experiments the damaged area in the mice was in the visual cortex and some of the animals did show a return of visual stimulus after the transplants. The researchers published their results in the journal Neuron and Science Daily picked up a release from the Belgium university, Libre de Bruxelles.

Drug gets brain stem cells to do better job. We retain a few brain stem cells throughout our life, but they are often not up to the task of repairing large areas of damage. This is the case in multiple sclerosis when our immune system destroys much of the myelin sheath that coats and protects the nerves.

Using a drug already approved by the Food and Drug Administration for other uses, researchers at the University of Buffalo were able to increase the production of myelin in a mouse model of the disease. The drug targets the middleman cells that are half way between stem cells and mature myelin called oligodendrocyte progenitor cells.

They found the drug by first stepping back to look to see what molecules inside the cell are normally active as the stem cells mature to progenitors and then to myelin. They identified a specific molecular pathway needed for this maturation and then looked for drugs that might impact that pathway. They hit upon solifenacin, an agent used for overactive bladder, which results from activity in that same molecular pathway. They told Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News that they are now looking for funding to conduct human clinical trails.

Stem cell foundation pushes for gender equality. The New York Stem Cell Foundation launched its “Initiative on Women in Science and Engineering (IWISE)” in February 2014 and this week the journal Cell Stem Cell published the resulting recommendations.

The IWISE working group’s first meeting a year ago resulted in seven actionable strategies to advance women in science, medicine and engineering. The group continued to refine those over the year, met again last month to finalize them prior to publication.

The seven strategies include:
1) Implement flexible family care spending
2) Provide “extra hands” awards
3) Recruit gender-balanced external review committees and speaker selection committees
4) Incorporate implicit bias statements
5) Focus on education as a tool
6) Create an institutional report card for gender equality
7) Partner to expand upon existing searchable databases of women in science, medicine, and engineering

The press release from NYSCF was picked up on the web site ECN and has a quote from former CIRM governing board member, Claire Pomeroy, who is now president of the Lasker Foundation.

“The brain power provided by women in science is essential to sustaining a thriving US society and economy. It is time to move beyond just lamenting its loss and embrace the actions called for in this timely report.”

Stem cell stories that caught our eye; viral genes in embryos, underuse of transplants and joint pain clinics

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Ancient viral invaders help make us, us. The cells of our ancestors millions of years ago may have found a way to turn viral invasion into a good thing. This genetic lemons-to-lemonade tale comes from a team in Singapore that meticulously looked at 650,000 bits of virus genes that have been left behind in our cells after viral infections.

Retroviruses like HIV can only replicate by integrating their genes into ours and getting our cellular machinery to make new copies of themselves. Biologists have long known that they often leave behind bits of their genes, but had assumed this became part of the “junk DNA” that does not serve any function and that makes up the bulk of the genetic material in our cells. That scenario has started to change over the past few years as teams have reported examples of those retroviral genetic elements playing a role in the regulation—the turning on and off—of our functional genes.
virus
Jonathan Goke, the lead researcher on the project at the Genome Institute of Singapore, wrote that roughly 1,400 of those viral gene elements were involved in the very early stages of embryo development, helping determine how cells decide to mature into different types of tissue. They seem to be needed for determining who we are.

In an article on the website science 2.0 Goke speculated that these viruses may have been able to speed-up evolution by making changes in gene function faster than random mutation.

Blood stem cell transplants under used. Even as the number of blood stem cell transplants ever performed has passed the one million mark, a new report warns that lives are at risk because too many patients that could benefit are not getting these transplants. Blood stem cell transplants, which started as bone marrow transplants, provide the only shot at life-saving therapy for many patients, mostly those with blood cancers.

An international team, led by Dietger Niederwieser of the University Hospital Leipzig in Germany, found a dramatic under use of donor cells for transplants that varied widely around the world. Writing in the Lancet they reported that just 0.4 people per 10 million in the Philippines get such transplants, but in Israel the number shoots up to 506. The report noted both uneven distribution of resources needed to perform the complex procedure and inconsistent support for and participation in donor registries. Niederwieser was quoted in a press release from the journal picked up by ScienceDaily:

“Patients, many of them children, are facing a life and death situation. Ultimately they will die if they cannot get the treatment they need. All countries need to provide adequate infrastructure for patients and donors to make sure that everyone who needs a transplant gets one, rather than the present situation in which access remains restricted to countries and people with sufficient resources.”

What is real with stem cells and joint pain? Bethesda Magazine, the local publication for the county that is home to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), produced a good piece giving the perspective of patients wanting to avoid joint replacement surgery as well as scientists leery of cell-based procedures that have very little evidence to back them up.

The magazine reached out to its neighbor, the NIH to provide some perspective. It quotes Pamela Robey, the co-coordinator of the NIH Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Transplantation Center—those stromal cells are one type of cell often touted by clinics offering to treat joint pain.

“There are a huge number of clinical trials, but there has been next to no published information. The bottom line is there’s no real rigorous data showing it is actually repairing the joint.”

The author also talked to CIRM grantee Larry Goldstein of the University of California, San Diego, in his role as a member of the Ethics and Public Policy Committee of the International Society for Stem Cell Research. He notes that what clinics are offering is unproven and the author directs readers to the ISSCR web site’s “Closer Look” section to get more information on how to evaluate potential therapies they may be considering.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye; progress toward artificial brain, teeth may help the blind and obesity

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

More progress toward artificial brain. A team at the RIKEN Institute in Japan has used stem cells in a 3-D culture to create brain tissue more complex than prior efforts and from an area of the brain not produced before, the cerebellum—that lobe at the lower back of the brain that controls motor function and attention. As far back as 2008, a RIKEN team had created simple tissue that mimicked the cortex, the large surface area that controls memory and language.

shutterstock_93075775

The Inquisitr web portal wrote a feature on a wide variety of efforts to create an artificial brain teeing off of this week’s publication of the cerebellum work in Cell Reports. The piece is fairly comprehensive covering computerized efforts to give robots intelligence and Europe’s Human Brain Project that is trying to map all the activity of the brain as a starting point for recapitulating it in the lab.

The experts interviewed included Robert Caplan of Tufts University in Massachusetts who is using 3-D scaffolding to build functional brain tissues that can process electrical signals. He is not planning any Frankenstein moments; he hopes to create models to improve understanding of brain diseases.

“Ideally we would like to have a laboratory brain system that recapitulates the most devastating diseases. We want to be able to take our existing toolkit of drugs and understand how they work instead of using trial and error.”

Teeth eyed as source of help for the blind. Today the European Union announced the first approval of a stem cell therapy for blindness. And already yesterday a team at the University of Pittsburg announced they had developed a new method to use stem cells to restore vision that could expand the number of patients who could benefit from stem cell therapy.

Many people have lost part or all their vision due to damage to the cornea on the surface of their eye. Even when they can gain vision back through a corneal transplant, their immune system often rejects the new tissue. So the ideal would be making new corneal tissue from the patient’s own cells. The Italian company that garnered the EU approval does this in patients by harvesting some of their own cornea-specific stem cells, called limbal stem cells. But this is only an option if only one eye is impacted by the damage.

The Pittsburgh team thinks it may have found an unlikely alternative source of limbal cells: the dental pulp taken from teeth that have be extracted. It is not as far fetched at it sounds on the surface. Teeth and the cornea both develop in the same section of the embryo, the cranial neural crest. So, they have a common lineage.

The researchers first treated the pulp cells with a solution that makes them turn into the type of cells found in the cornea. Then they created a fiber scaffold shaped like a cornea and seeded the cells on it. Many steps remain before people give up a tooth to regain their sight, but this first milestone points the way and was described in a press release from the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine, which was picked up by the web site ClinicaSpace.

CIRM funds a project that also proposes to use the patient’s own limbal stem cells but using methods more likely to gain approval of the Food and Drug Administration than those used by the Italian company.

Stem cells and the fight against obesity. Of the two types of stem cells found in your bone marrow, one can form bone and cartilage and, all too often, fat. Preventing these stem cells from maturing into fat may be a tool in the fight against obesity according to a team at Queen Mary University of London.

The conversion of stem cells to fat seems to involve the cilia, or hair-like projections found on cells. When the cilia lengthen the stem cells progress toward becoming fat. But if the researchers genetically prevented that lengthening, they stopped the conversion to fat cells. The findings opens several different ways to think about understanding and curbing obesity says Melis Dalbay one of the authors of the study in a university press release picked up by ScienceNewsline.

“This is the first time that it has been shown that subtle changes in primary cilia structure can influence the differentiation of stem cells into fat. Since primary cilia length can be influenced by various factors including pharmaceuticals, inflammation and even mechanical forces, this study provides new insight into the regulation of fat cell formation and obesity.”

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: Cancer genetics, cell fate, super donors and tale of road to diabetes cure

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

For cancer growth timing is everything. A study originating at the University of Southern California suggests tumors are born to be bad. Mutations constantly occur during the life of a tumor but those that occur early on determine if a tumor will grow as a benign mass of a cancerous one that spreads.

Describing the genetic markers the team found, the senior author, Christina Curtis, who recently moved to Stanford, was quoted in a story in ScienceBlog:

“What you see in the final cancer was there from the beginning.”

The CIRM funded team completed detailed genetic analysis of tumor cells surgically removed from colon cancer patients. Doctors treating these patients have long been hampered by an inability to tell which tumors will remain small and benign and which will develop into full-blown cancer. The researchers suggest the genetic fingerprints they have uncovered could lead to improved diagnosis for patients.

Physical forces also key to cell fate.
Putting the squeeze on stem cells may be what’s needed to get them to become bone. In this case, a team at the University of California, San Diego, used teeny tiny tweezers called “optical tweezers,” to trigger key internal signals that directed stem cells to go down the path to bone.

Pressure results in release of a cell signal shown in red

Pressure results in release of a cell signal shown in red

We have frequently written about the tremendous importance of a stem cell’s environment—its neighborhood if you will—in determining its fate. Yingxiao Wang, who led the study, described this role in a press release from the university picked up by ScienceNewsline:

“The mechanical environment around a stem cell helps govern a stem cell’s fate. Cells surrounded in stiff tissue such as the jaw, for example, have higher amounts of tension applied to them, and they can promote the production of harder tissues such as bone.”

He said the findings should help researchers trying to replicate the natural stem cell environment in the lab when they try to grow replacement tissues for patients.

Super donors could provide matching tissue.
One of the biggest challenges of using stem cells to replace damaged tissue is avoiding immune system rejection of the new cells. CIRM-grantee Cellular Dynamics International (CDI) announced this week that they have made key initial steps to creating a cell bank that could make this much easier.

Our bodies use molecules on the surface of our cells to identify tissue that is ours versus foreign such as bacteria. The huge variation in those molecules, called HLA, makes the matching needed for donor organ, or donor cells, more difficult than the New York Times Sunday crossword. But a few individuals posses an HLA combination that allows them to match to a large percent of the population.

CDI has now created clinical grade stem cell lines using iPS reprogramming of adult tissue from two such “super donors.” Just those two cell lines provide genetic matches for 19 percent of the population. The company plans to develop additional lines from other super donors with the goal of creating a bank that would cover 95 percent of the population.

Reuters picked up the company’s press release. CIRM does not fund this project, but we do fund another cell bank for which CDI is creating cells to better understand the causes of 11 diseases that have complex genetic origins

Narrative tells the tale of developing diabetes therapy. MIT Technology Review has published a well-told feature about the long road to creating a stem cell-based therapy for diabetes. Author Bran Alexander starts with the early days of the “stem cell wars” and carries the tale through treatment of the first patients in the CIRM-funded clinical trial being carried out by ViaCyte and the University of California, San Diego.

The piece quotes Viacyte’s chief scientific officer Kevin D’Amour about the long road:

“When I first came to ViaCyte 12 years ago, cell replacement through stem cells was so obvious. We all said, ‘Oh, that’s the low-hanging fruit.’ But it turned out to be a coconut, not an apple.”

But the article shows that with Viacyte’s product as well as others coming down the pike, that coconut has been cracked and real hope for diabetics lies inside.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: repairing radiation damage, beta thalassemia clinical trial and disease models

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Stem cells repair brain damage from radiation therapy. Radiation for brain cancer can be a lifesaver but it can also be a dramatic life changer. If often leaves patients with considerably reduced brain function. Now a team at New York’s Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center has found a way to instruct human stem cells to repair some of that damage—at least in rats.

The damage seems to be to the middle-man or so-called progenitor cells that maintain the myelin cells that insulate the nerves in the brain. When that myelin is damaged by the radiation those progenitor cells are no longer able to make repairs and that results in reduced nerve function. Rats given the stem cells regained both cognitive and motor skills lost after brain radiation.

The team leader, Viviane Taber, noted this work could make radiation therapy even more of a lifesaver. ScienceDaily quoted Tabar from materials provided by Cell Press that published the work:

“This will have to be proven further, but if we can repair the brain effectively, we could be bolder with our radiation dosing, within limits.”

This could be especially important in children, for whom physicians deliberately deliver lower radiation doses.


Stem cell trial for Beta-Thalassemia cleared to begin.
CIRM-grantee Sangamo BioSciences announced this week that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had accepted its application to begin a clinical trial using genetically edited stem cells to treat patients with beta-thalassemia. This trial, in patients who require regular blood transfusions to survive, is the ninth CIRM-funded clinical trail to gain clearance from the FDA.

Other clinical trials have used genetically modified stem cells, but they have used various techniques to add a correct gene or silence an unwanted gene. This will be the first clinical trial using one of the newer techniques that actually goes into a person’s genes and edits them to correct a disease. We wrote about this beta-thalassemia project here.

The Sacramento Business Times picked up the company’s press release that quoted Sangamo president Edward Lanphier on the company’s goal, “the aim of providing transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia patients with a one-time treatment for this devastating disease.”

Disease modeling for science wonks. Vivien Marx wrote a feature article for Nature Methods that provides the most thorough review of the use of reprogramed iPS-type stem cells as disease models that I have read. In particular she discusses the power of using new gene editing tools to modify the cells so that when they mature into adult tissues they will display specific disease traits.

Svendsen hopes to use gene-edited iPS type stem cells to fully understand neurodegenerative diseases

Svendsen hopes to use gene-edited iPS type stem cells to fully understand neurodegenerative diseases

She starts with a narrative about CIRM-grantee Clive Svendsen’s work to understand spinal muscular atropohy (SMA) when he was in Wisconsin and to understand amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) now at Cedars Sinai in Los Angeles. She goes on to show just how powerful these gene-edited stem cells can be, but also how difficult it is to use the technology in a way that generates useful information. Marx is a strong science journalist, who for many years has shown a skill at explaining complex technologies.

She also discusses the various iPS cell banks developed around the world including CIRM’s cell bank and the value of having non-gene-edited cells from patients that naturally show the disease traits.

Thorough review of changes at CIRM.
Alex Lash at xconomy wrote an in-depth overview of our president Randy Mills’ plans for the next phase of our agency that Randy calls CIRM 2.0. Calling the plans an extensive “renovation” Lash described the portions of the new structure that were already in place and listed the ones set to come online in the next six months.

As a balanced journalist he runs through some of the highs and lows of our public perception during the initial phase of the agency and then discusses the new tone set by Mills:

“CIRM is less a grant-making government agency than a ‘discerning investor’ that’s going to be ‘as creative and innovative’ as possible in getting treatments approved, Mills says. ‘We have no mission above accelerating stem cell therapies to patients.’ ”

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: new ways to reprogram, shifting attitudes on tissue donation, and hockey legend’s miracle questioned

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Insulin-producing cells produced from skin. Starting with human skin cells a team at the University of Iowa has created iPS-type stem cells through genetic reprogramming and matured those stem cells into insulin-producing cells that successfully brought blood-sugar levels closer to normal when transplanted in mice.

University of Iowa researchers reprogrammed human skin cells to create iPS cells, which were then differentiated in a stepwise fashion to create insulin-producing cells. When these cells were transplanted into diabetic mice, the cells secreted insulin and reduced the blood sugar levels of the mice to normal or near-normal levels. The image shows the insulin-producing cells (right) and precursor cells (left). [Credit: University of Iowa]

University of Iowa researchers reprogrammed human skin cells to create iPS cells, which were then differentiated in a stepwise fashion to create insulin-producing cells. When these cells were transplanted into diabetic mice, the cells secreted insulin and reduced the blood sugar levels of the mice to normal or near-normal levels. The image shows the insulin-producing cells (right) and precursor cells (left).
[Credit: University of Iowa]

The cells did not completely restore blood-sugar levels to normal, but did point to the possibility of achieving that goal in the future, something the team leader Nicholas Zavazava noted in an article in the Des Moines Register, calling the work an “encouraging first step” toward a potential cure for diabetes.

The Register discussed the possibility of making personalized cells that match the genetics of the patient and avoiding the need for immune suppression. This has long been a goal with iPS cells, but increasingly the research community has turned to looking for options that would avoid immune rejection with donor cells that could be off-the-shelf and less expensive than making new cells for each patient.

Heart cells from reprogramming work in mice. Like several other teams, a group in Japan created beating heart cells from iPS-type stem cells. But they went the additional step of growing them into sheets of heart muscle that when transplanted into mice integrated into the animals own heart and beat to the same rhythm.

The team published the work in Cell Transplantation and the news agency AlianzaNews ran a story noting that it has previously been unclear if these cells would get in sync with the host heart muscle. The result provides hope this could be a route to repair hearts damaged by heart attack.

Patient attitudes on donating tissue. A University of Michigan study suggests most folks don’t care how you use body tissue they donate for research if you ask them about research generically. But their attitudes change when you ask about specific research, with positive responses increasing for only one type of research: stem cell research.

On the generic question, 69 percent said go for it, but when you mentioned the possibility of abortion research more than half said no and if told the cells might lead to commercial products 45 percent said nix. The team published their work in the Journal of the American Medical Association and HealthCanal picked up the university’s press release that quoted the lead researcher, Tom Tomlinson, on why paying attention to donor preference is so critical:

“Biobanks are becoming more and more important to health research, so it’s important to understand these concerns and how transparent these facilities need to be in the research they support.”

CIRM has begun building a bank of iPS-type stem cells made from tissue donated by people with one of 11 diseases. We went through a very detailed process to develop uniform informed consent forms to make sure the donors for our cell bank knew exactly how their cells could be used. Read more about the consent process here.

Mainstream media start to question hockey legend’s miracle. Finally some healthy skepticism has arrived. Hockey legend Gordie Howe’s recovery from a pair of strokes just before the holidays was treated by the general media as a true Christmas miracle. The scientific press tried to layer the coverage with some questions of what we don’t know about his case but not the mainstream media. The one exception I saw was Brad Fikes in the San Diego Union Tribune who had to rely on a couple of scientists who were openly speaking out at the time. We wrote about their concerns then as well.

Now two major outlets have raised questions in long pieces back-to-back yesterday and this morning. The Star in hockey-crazed Canada wrote the first piece and New York Magazine wrote today’s. Both raise serious questions about whether stem cells could have been the cause of Howe’s recovery and are valuable additions to the coverage.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: Heart self-repair, MS therapy and genetic screening

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Uncovering mystery of heart self-repair. We have often written about work that tries to get the body’s self-healing mechanisms to do a better job. This is particularly desirable but difficult in heart injury. A CIRM-funded team as Children’s Hospital Los Angeles found some clues to achieving this goal by investigating critters good at it. Neonatal mice have an amazing capacity to repair heart damage for about the first seven days of their life.

A young mouse heart with resting heart muscle cells (red) and proliferating muscle cells (green)

A young mouse heart with resting heart muscle cells (red) and proliferating muscle cells (green)

The team looked at what genetic and molecular systems were active during the period of repair and not active at other times. Senior author of the study, Ellen Lien, described the importance of what they are finding in a press release picked up by ScienceCodex:

“Using models such as zebrafish and neonatal mice that regenerate their hearts naturally, we can begin to identify important molecules that enhance heart repair.”

Good news on MS needed many caveats. Some good news on using stem cell transplants for Multiple Sclerosis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association this week sparked a flurry of news reports. But most of those stories lacked the caveats the study required and generated several calls to our office from desperate patients wanting to try the therapy. HealthDay did a good job of pointing out the hope and the limitations of the therapy and of the clinical trial itself.

Only half of the patients responded, which is still good for what can be such an intractable disease. But, only one subset of patients showed the benefit; ones earlier in the course of the disease with the form known as relapsing-remitting MS. None of the later stage patients responded, which makes some sense because if the transplant is altering the immune system, it would have the most impact when the patient’s immune cells are most actively attacking their nerves.

A personal tale of using genetic screening of embryos. Over the past couple years researchers’ need for new embryonic stem cell lines has declined. As a result, many of the new cell lines registered with the National Institutes of Health in the past year have been ones carrying specific genetic disease traits that have been screened out of consideration by couples using pre-implant genetic diagnosis (PGD) for family planning at in vitro fertilization clinics.

While we have written about this conceptually a feature story posted by the University of Michigan and picked up by ScienceDaily makes it very real through a family’s personal story. A devastating nerve disease called ALD runs in the prospective mother’s family so they decided to use PGD to avoid having a child with the disease, but they took it one step further. They donated the left over embryos that carried the genetic flaw to the university for research. Now they are about to celebrate the first birthday of a healthy son and the researchers have a valuable research tool as one stem cell scientist at the University, Gary Smith, explained:

“Disease-specific human embryonic stem cells are the gold standard for research —the purest pathway to understanding disease establishment and progression, and to discovering ways to prevent or alleviate pain and suffering caused by these diseases.”