A scientific conference we can all enjoy

Scientific conferences are fascinating events. You get a chance to mingle with some of the leading researchers and thinkers in the field, and to learn about the latest advances. But, to be honest, for those of us who don’t have a scientific background, they can also be a little bit intimidating.

This is sometimes how I feel at them.

Courtesy The New Yorker

Courtesy The New Yorker

That’s where the World Stem Cell Summit comes in. It’s an annual event that brings together researchers, companies, scientists and patient advocates to talk about the progress being made in stem cell research and to explore ways to advance the field even further, and faster by working together.

Changing the tone

The patient advocate role is a critical one here. It makes the voice of the patient a key element in every discussion and changes the tone of the event from talking about what is being done to or for patients, to what is being done with patients. It’s a small but tremendously important difference.

Dr. Evan Snyder, Director of the Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine program at Sanford – Burnham Medical Research Institute captures that feel when he says:

“We’re looking forward to the valuable information-sharing opportunities and discussions that only occur when stem cell researchers, patient advocates, and representatives of many other stakeholder groups converge at the World Stem Cell Summit. Occasions like these help us advance our research on the basic biology of stem cells and spur the development of new, and more personalized, medical applications for this science.”

Because more than ten percent of those attending are patient advocates the talks are given at a level that someone without a science background can generally understand. The presentations are no less fascinating; they are just a lot more accessible.

Stephen Rose, the Chief Research Officer with the Foundation Fighting Blindness says it brings different groups together in a way other conferences usually don’t:

“Policy experts learned about researchers’ needs. Advocates learn about policy and legislation. It also brought ethical issues to the table, which is critical if we’re going to resolve them and keep the research moving forward.”

Researchers have a lot of opportunities throughout the year to meet with other scientists but patient advocates don’t, so the World Stem Cell Summit is a great chance for them to meet with their colleagues and counterparts from all over the US. It gives them a chance to share ideas, offer support and explore ways they can collaborate.

More than just a meeting

For many advocates who are focused on diseases that affect relatively small numbers of people these events are a great way to recharge their batteries and to remind themselves they are not alone in this fight.

If you are thinking about going to one conference this year, this is a great one to chose. This year the World Stem Cell Summit is being held December 10 – 12 in Atlanta, Georgia.

We’ll be there and we’d love to see you there too.

New Video: Spinal Cord Injury and a CIRM-Funded Stem Cell-Based Trial

Just 31 years old, Richard Lajara thought he was going to die.


Richard Lajara, the 4th participant in Geron’s stem cell-based clinical trial for spinal cord injury.

On September 9, 2011 he slipped on some rocks at a popular swimming hole and was swept down a waterfall headfirst into a shallow, rocky pool of water. Though he survived, the fall left him paralyzed from the waist down due to a severed spinal cord.

Patient Number Four
At that same time period, Geron Inc. had launched a clinical trial CIRM helped fund testing the safety of a stem cell-based therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI). It was the world’s first trial using cells derived from human embryonic stem cells and Lajara was an eligible candidate. Speaking to CIRM’s governing Board this past summer for a Spotlight on Disease seminar, he recalled his decision to participate:

“When I participated with the Geron study, I was honored to be a part of it. It was groundbreaking and the decision was pretty easy. I understood that it was very early on and I wasn’t looking for any improvement but laying the foundation [for future trials].”

A few months after his treatment, Geron discontinued the trial for business reasons. Lajara was devastated and felt let down. But this year the therapy got back on track with the announcement in June by Asterias Biotherapeutics that they had treated their first spinal cord injury patient after having purchased the stem cell assets of Geron.

Getting Hope Back on Track
Dr. Jane Lebkowski, Asterias’ President of R&D and Chief Scientific Officer, also spoke at the Spotlight on Disease seminar to provide an overview and update on the company’s clinical trial. A video recording of Lebkowski’s and Lajara’s presentations is now available on our web site and posted here:

As Dr. Lebkowski explains in the video, Asterias didn’t have to start from scratch. The Geron study data showed the therapy was well tolerated and didn’t cause any severe safety issues. In that trial, five people (including Richard Lajara) with injuries in their back received an injection of two million stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells into the site of spinal cord damage. The two million-cell dose was not expected to show any effect but was focused on ensuring the therapy was safe.

Oligodendrocyte Precursors: Spinal Cord Healers
As the former Chief Scientific Officer at Geron, Lebkowski spoke first hand about why the oligodendrocyte precursor was the cell of choice for the clinical trial. Previous animal studies showed that oligodendrocyte progenitors, a cell type normally found in the spinal cord, have several properties that make them ideal cells for treating SCI: first, they help stimulate the growth of damaged neurons, the cell type responsible for transmitting electrical signals from the brain to the limbs.

Second, the oligodendrocytes produce myelin, a protein that acts as an insulator of neurons, very much like the plastic covering on a wire. In many spinal cord injuries, the nerves are still intact but lose their myelin insulation and their ability to send signals. Third, the oligodendrocytes release other proteins that help reduce the size of cysts that often form at the injury site and damage neurons. In preclinical experiments, these properties of oligodendrocyte progenitors improved limb movement in spinal cord-severed rodents.

Together, the preclinical animal studies and the safety data from the Geron clinical trial helped Asterias win approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to start their current trial, also funded by CIRM, this time treating patients with neck injuries instead of back injuries.

The Asterias trial is a dose escalation study with the first group of three patients again receiving two million cells. The trial was designed such that if this dose shows a good safety profile in the neck, as it did in the Geron trial in the back, then the next cohort of five patients will receive 10 million cells. In fact, Asterias reported in August that the lower dose was not only safe but also showed some encouraging results in one of the patients. And just two days ago Asterias announced their data monitoring committee recommended to begin enrolling patients for the 10 million cell dose.  If all continues to go well with safety, the dose will be escalated to 20 million cells in the third cohort of five patients. While two million cells was a very low safety dose, Asterias anticipates seeing some benefit from the 10 and 20 million cell doses.

Changing Lives by Increasing Independence
Does Lebkowski’s team expect the patients to stand up out of their wheelchairs post-treatment? No, but they do hope to see a level of improvement that could dramatically increase quality of life and decrease the level of care needed. Specifically, they are looking to see a so-called “two motor level improvement.” In her talk Lebkowski explained this quantitative measure with the chart below:

“If a patient is a C4 [meaning their abilities are consistent with someone with a spinal cord injury at the fourth cervical, or neck, bone] they will need anywhere from 18 to 24 hours of attendant care for daily living. If we could improve their motor activity such that they become a C6, that is just two motor levels, what you can see is independence tremendously increases and we go from 18 to 24 hour attendant care to having attendant care for about four hours of housework.”

Slide13 cropped

Small improvements in movement abilities can be life changing for people with spinal cord injuries.

It’s so exciting the field is at a point in time that scientists like Dr. Lebkowski are discussing real stem cell-based clinical trials that are underway in real patients who could achieve real improvements in their lives that otherwise would not be possible.

And we have people like Richard Lajara to thank. I think Dr. Oswald Stewart, the Board’s spinal cord injury patient advocate, summed it up well when speaking to Lajara at the meeting:

“Science and discovery and translation [into therapies] doesn’t happen without people like you who are willing to put yourselves on the line to move things forward. Thank you for being in that first round of people testing this new therapy.”

Don Reed Reflects on the California Stem Cell Initiative

StemCellBattlesCoverYesterday was stem cell awareness day. In honor of this important event, Don Reed held a book reading at CIRM for his newly released book, STEM CELL BATTLES: Proposition 71 and Beyond: How Ordinary People Can Fight Back Against the Crushing Burden of Chronic Disease.

Don has worn many hats during his life. He’s been a power lifter, a diver at Sea World, and is one of California’s most tenacious stem cell research advocates. His stem cell journey began when his son, Roman Reed, was seriously injured in a football accident, leaving him mostly paralyzed from the neck down.

Both Don and Roman didn’t let this tragic event ruin their lives or steal their hope. In fact, both Don and his son were instrumental for getting proposition 71 to pass, leading to the birth of CIRM and new hope for patients with uncured diseases.

At yesterday’s book reading, Don chronicled the early battles to get human stem cell research off the ground in California, the progress that’s been made so far and the promise for future therapies. It was truly an inspiring event, bringing together patients, friends of Don and his wife Gloria, and CIRM scientists to celebrate the stem cell research accomplishments of the past ten years.


Enjoy more pictures of the event below and a short video of Jonathan Thomas, Chair of the Governing Board of CIRM, who said a few words in praise of Don Reed’s efforts to fight for stem cell research in California.


Don Reed and his wife Gloria share a smile with CIRM’s Pat Olson.


Jonathan Thomas and Don Reed.

Related links:

CIRM Scholar Spotlight: Matt Donne on Lung Stem Cells

CIRM has funded a number of educational and research training programs over the past ten years to give younger students and graduate/postdoc scholars the opportunity to explore stem cell science.

Two of the main programs we support are the Bridges and the CIRM Scholars Training Program. These programs fund future scientists from an undergraduate to postdoctoral level with a goal of creating “training programs that will significantly enhance the technical skills, knowledge, and experience of a diverse cohort of… trainees in the development of stem cell based therapies.”

The Stem Cellar team was interested to hear from Bridges and CIRM scholars themselves about their experience with these programs, how their careers have benefited from CIRM funding, and what research accomplishments they have under their belt. We were able to track some of these scholars down, and will be publishing a series of interview-style blogs featuring them over the next few months.

Matt Donne

Matt Donne

We start off with a Matt Donne, a PhD student at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) in the Developmental and Stem Cell Biology graduate program. Matt is a talented scientist and has a pretty cool story about his research training path. I sat down with Matt to ask him a few questions.

Q: Tell us how you got into a Stem Cell graduate program at UCSF.

MD: I was fortunate to have Dr. Carmen Domingo from San Francisco State support my application into the CIRM Bridges Program. I’d been working for Dr. Susan Fisher at UCSF for a couple of years and realized that I wanted to get a PhD and go to UCSF. I thought the best way to do that was improve my GPA and get a masters degree in stem cell biology. I applied to the CIRM program at SF State, and was accepted.

The Bridges Program has been a great feeder platform to get students more science experience exposure than they would have otherwise received, and prepares them well to move on to competitive graduate schools.

After receiving my Masters degree, I was admitted into the first year of the Developmental and Stem Cell Biology program at UCSF. When the opportunity to apply for a training grant from CIRM came about between my first and second year of at UCSF, I knew I had to give it a chance and apply. With the help of my mentor, Dr. Jason Rock, I wrote a solid proposal and was awarded the fellowship.

While at SF State, Carmen was extremely supportive and always available for her students. Since then, many of us still keep in touch and more have joined the UCSF graduate school community.

Q: Can you describe your graduate research?

MD: The field of regenerative medicine is searching for ways to allow us to repair injuries similar to how the Marvel Comic Wolverine can repair his wounds in the movies. One interesting fact which has been known for several decades, but has not been able to be investigated more deeply until now, is the innate ability for the adult lung to regrow lost lung tissue without any sort of intervention. My thesis focuses on defining the molecular mechanisms and stem cell niches that allow for this normal, healthy adult lung tissue growth. The working hypothesis is if we can understand what makes a cell undergo healthy tissue proliferation and differentiation, we could stimulate this response to cure individuals who suffer from diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Similarly, if we understand how a cell decides to respond in a diseased way, we could stop or revert the disease process from occurring.

One of the models we use in our lab is a “pneumosphere” culture. We essentially grow alveoli, which are the site of gas exchange in the lung, in a dish to attempt to understand how specific alveolar stem cells signal and interact with one another. This information will teach us how these cells behave so we can in turn either promote a healthy response to injury or, potentially, stop the progression of unhealthy cell responses. The technique of growing alveoli in a dish allows us to cut down on the “noise” and focus on major cellular pathways, which we can then more selectively apply to our mouse model systems.

Pneumospheres. (Photo by Matt Donne)

Pneumospheres or “lung cells in a dish”. (Photo by Matt Donne)

Lung cells.

Lung pneumospheres under a microscope. (Photo by Matt Donne)

We are now in the process of submitting a paper demonstrating some of the molecular players that are involved in this regenerative lung response. Hopefully the reviewers will think our paper is as awesome we as believe it to be.

Q: How has being a CIRM scholar benefited your graduate research career?

MD: Starting in my second year at UCSF, I was awarded the CIRM fellowship. I think it helped the lab to have the majority of my stipend covered through the CIRM fellowship, and personally I was very excited about the $5,000 discretionary budget. These monies allowed me to go to conferences every year for the past three years, and also have helped to support the costs of my experiments.

The first conference I attended was a Gordon Conference in Italy on Developmental Biology. There I was able to learn more about the field and also make friends with many professors, students, and postdocs from around the world. Last year, I went to my first lung-specific conference, and attended again this year. That has been one of the highlights of my PhD career. While there, one is able to speak and interact with professors whose names are seen in many textbooks and published papers. I never thought I would be able to so casually interact with them and develop relationships. Since then, I have been able to work on small collaborations with professors from across the US.

It was great that I could go to these conferences and establish important relationships with professors without being a major financial burden to my Professor. Plus, it has been hugely beneficial for my career as I now have professors whom I can reach out to as I look towards my future as a scientist.

Q: What other benefits did the CIRM scholars program provide you?

MD: Dr. Susan Fisher has been in charge of the CIRM program at UCSF. She organized lunch-time research talks that involved both academic as well as non-academic leaders in the field. I enjoyed the extra exposure to new fields of stem cell biology as well as the ability to learn more about the start-up and non-academic world. There are not many programs that offer this type of experience, and I felt fortunate to be a part of it. Also, the free lunches on occasion were a nice perk for a grad student living in San Francisco!

I attended the CIRM organized conferences whenever they happened. It’s always great presenting at or attending poster sessions at these events, seeing familiar faces and meeting new people. I took full advantage of the learning and networking that CIRM allowed me to do. The CIRM elevator pitch competition was really cool too. I didn’t win, came in third, but I enjoyed the challenge of trying to break down my thesis project into a digestible one-minute pitch.

Q: Where do you see the field of lung biology and regenerative medicine heading?

MD: My take away from the research conferences I have attended with the help of CIRM-funding is that we are in a very exciting time for lung stem cell research. The field overall is still young, but there are many labs across the world now working on a “lung mapping project” to better define stem cell populations in the lung. I see this research in the future translating in to regenerative therapies by which diseased cells/tissue will be targeted to actually stop the disease progression, and in turn possibly repair and regenerate healthy new tissue. This research has wide reaching implications as it has the potential to help everyone from a premature baby more quickly develop mature healthy lungs, to adults suffering from COPD brought on by environmental factors, such as air pollution. As many scientists are often quoted, “This is a very exciting time for our field.”

Q: What are your future plans?

MD: I expect to graduate in about a year’s time. In the future, I want to pursue a career focusing on the social impact of science. I aspire to be someone like UCSF’s former chancellor Dr. Susan Desmond-Hellmand. It’s really cool to go from someone who was the president of product development at Genentech, to chancellor at UCSF, to now president of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Bringing science to impact society in that way is what I hope to do with my future.

Related links:

Alzheimer’s Nightmare Spurs Comedy Fundraiser to Help Caregivers – New Video

You could have heard a pin drop in the auditorium. The audience of young stem cell researchers was gripped by every word of Lauren Miller’s heartbreaking story about the impact that Alzheimer’s disease has had on her family. Only a child when her grandfather was diagnosed with and later died of Alzheimer’s, she mistook his symptoms, like repeating stories over and over, as his way of making her laugh.

Lauren was fifteen and much more aware of the brutality of the disease when her grandmother, the vibrant family matriarch, was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and soon, ”stopped talking, stopped walking and eventually curled up in a ball and stayed that way for the last, many months of her life.”

Miller, a screenwriter and film actress, is the Alzheimer’s patient advocate member of CIRM’s Board. Last month, she was the opening speaker at the 2015 CIRM Bridges Trainee Meeting, a two-day event which showcases the work of undergraduate and Master’s level students who, through the support of the Bridges program, conducted stem cell research at world class research institutes in California. This video recording of Lauren’s talk is a great watch but keep a hanky near by:

Her presentation clearly resonated with the students, likely because their internships were mostly centered around the laboratory bench, and Lauren’s story provided a personal, first-hand account of a disease that could one day be treated by stem cell-based therapies. Also, Lauren was just about their age when, sadly, she first realized that her mom was showing the signs of early onset Alzheimer’s. Her memory of this moment is crushing:

“I first noticed it the weekend of my college graduation. She told me the same stories a few times and deep down inside I was devastated. I said nothing to anyone. Maybe if I pretended it didn’t happen, it wouldn’t be real. Maybe it was a one-time thing and it would just go away. Of course, it didn’t go away.”

Out of this darkness, Lauren has become a source of unwavering support for other families and caregivers who are beaten down by this disease on a daily basis. She and her husband Seth Rogen founded Hilarity for Charity which she says aims, “to raise awareness about Alzheimer’s among young adults and to support those who are going through it.” In only three and a half years, Hilarity for Charity has raised almost $3 million. Recently they launched a partnership with Home Instead Senior Care and in the past six months have funded 8000 hours of free at home care to give Alzheimer’s caregivers a much needed break. For me, one of the most poignant sections of Lauren’s talk is when she read a note from one of the recipients of these grants:

“The words, ‘thank you’, just don’t seem to be enough to express my heartfelt appreciation. I’ve barely been out of Sue’s sight since 2006 and our world has shrunk to the size of her bedroom and bath with conversations from babbling to hysteria. Please accept my total gratitude for this chance to join humanity again.”

At CIRM, our Board has awarded close to $55 million to stem cell related Alzheimer’s research. These cutting edge research projects aim to gain a better understanding of the disease and to progress stem cell-based treatments into clinical trials. Here’s hoping for an accelerated cure for Alzheimer’s to end the suffering of both patients and caregivers.

Related Links:

Stories of Hope: Lauren Miller
Stories of Hope: Dick Mora
CIRM Alzheimer’s Disease Program Fact Sheet
Video: Alzheimer’s Stem Cell Research: Ask the Expert – Larry Goldstein, UCSD
Video: Neural Stem Cells Reverse Alzheimer’s-Like Symptoms

A Stem Cell Summer with Taylor Swift, Jay-Z, and Carly Rae Jepsen (New Videos)

Was that a stem cell conference or a film festival?

It’s a question that may have been on some attendees’ minds last Friday at CIRM’s Creativity Day in San Mateo. The event showcased the accomplishments of about 70 high school students who did cutting-edge stem cell research as part of a CIRM-funded summer internship program at nine world-class institutions in California. The remarkable, young students gave graduate-level research presentations and showed off posters of their scientific findings to their lab mentors, the CIRM team, and proud family members.

While the main focus of the internship was lab research, we also included a social media assignment that asked students to capture their internship experiences by writing blogs, taking Instagram photos, or making movies. And just as the student poured their excitement, smarts, and hard work into their research, they also went all-in with the social media challenge.

I don’t know how they found the time, but eight videos were submitted in all – the most yet since the program started. And they’re fabulous! The CIRM team members who voted on the best videos were blown away by the inventiveness and artistry of the videos. Many students parodied popular songs by the likes of Taylor Swift, Jay-Z and Carly Rae Jepsen. They went above and beyond choreographing their own dance routines in the lab and injecting stem cell science into the lyrics. There was even a parody of the Jerry Seinfeld show called “Cirmfeld”.

The best social media submissions in each category were recognized at the Creativity Day (we blogged about the best blog yesterday). It was a very tough choice deciding on the best video, but in the end we choose one winner and two honorable mentions. In that moment just before the winner was announced, the students were holding their collective breaths and nervously sitting at the edge their seats. It really had the atmosphere of a film festival.

The winning video was a parody of Taylor Swift’s “Blank Space” by Vanessa Arreola & Camilia Kacimi who did their internships at the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco. The duo shot, edited and scripted the video themselves. Their work is a great example of an effective way to communicate science to the public: start with a subject people know about, add creativity and humor, and teach some science along the way. Watch the video here:

The two honorable mentions also did fantastic jobs communicating science in an accessible way. The high school interns at City of Hope parodied Carly Rae Jepsen’s “I Really Like You” with their beautifully shot and edited video, “We’re Really Close (To a Breakthrough)”:

The students at Stanford also parodied Taylor Swift but in addition they threw down some fierce lyrics in their parody of a Jay-Z and Kayne West track. I do believe it’s the world’s first rap to include a reference to renown Stanford stem cell researcher, Irv Weissman:

You can watch all the videos on CIRMTV, the agency’s YouTube channel.

Congratulations and best of luck to all of the Creativity students. The future is bright for stem cell science!

Creativity sparks a bright future for science

When some people want to see the future they use a crystal ball. Others use tarot cards or runes. But when anyone at CIRM wants to see the future all we have to do is look into the faces of the students in our Creativity program.

Creativity students 2015 with program director Dr. Mani Vessal (front & center with tie)

Creativity students 2015 with program director Dr. Mani Vessal (front & center with tie)

Over the past three years the Creativity program has given some 220 California high school students a chance to spend the summer working in a world-class stem cell research facility. And when I say work, I mean work. They are required to attend lectures, grow their own stem cells, and do experiments. In short, they are expected to do what all the other scientists in the lab do. In return they get a great experience, and a modest stipend for their effort. At the end they produce papers on their work with titles like:

  • Notch Signaling as a Possible Regulator of Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Differentiation in the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche
  • RNA Splicing Factor ZRSR2 in Human Erythroleukemia and Stem Cells

We also ask the students to either write a blog or create a video about their experiences over the summer. Many do both. We’ll come back to the video portion later this week. The blogs make for a great read because they chart the students as they progress from knowing little if anything about stem cells, to being quite proficient at working with them. And all in just 8 weeks. One of the hardest parts of our job is choosing the best blog. For example Alice Lin, part of the City of Hope program, got an honorable mention for her blog that was a “diary” written by an embryonic stem cell. Here’s a small sample of her approach:

‘Also, this is NOT YOUR TYPICAL LAB JOURNAL ENTRY. It’s an autobiography chronicling my life. That way, when the stem cell controversy cools down, the general public can get a FIRST HAND ACCOUNT of what we do. This blog is going to rack up some serious views someday. Until then, I’m attached to my colony and the plate.’

Ryan Hale, part of the Scripps team, wrote about how the experience taught him to think like a scientist:

‘One day, after performing an experiment, our mentor asked us the reason behind our experiment. He wasn’t asking us about the experimental procedure or quizzing us on the pre-reading packet, he wanted us to understand the thought process a researcher would go through to actually think up such an experiment… Our mentor stressed how important it is to be creative, inquisitive, and critical if one wants to become a successful researcher.’

Selena Zhang

Selena Zhang

The winner was Selena Zhang, also part of the City of Hope team. She writes about her experiences in the lab, learning the ropes, getting to understand the technology and language of science. But it’s her closing paragraph that sealed the deal for us. In a few short sentences she manages to capture the romance, the mystery and the magic of science. And we’re also happy to say that this program is coming back next year, and the year after that, for five more years. Our Board has just approved renewed funding. The name of the program is changing, it will be called SPARK, but the essence will remain the same. Giving young students a glimpse at a future in science. You don’t need a crystal ball to know that with these students the future is bright. Here’s Selena’s winning blog:

My very own lab coat. It was a lot to live up to, my freshly laundered lab coat with the City of Hope logo. Looking around the lab, I was nervous and excited to start my very first day. There were papers to read and meetings with my mentor to hear about my project. I was starstruck, as I learned that I would be working with induced pluripotent stem cells, Alzheimer’s disease, and CRISPR. Terms that seemed to only exist in textbooks and science magazines that I lovingly read at the library were suddenly alive to me. Although, embarrassingly enough, the only thing that came to mind when my mentor mentioned CRISPR was a salad crisper. Fairly certain that she was a) speaking about something else and b) that I needed to eat more for breakfast, I asked her what that was. It turned out that CRISPR was a new genome editing tool we could use to create isogenic lines to study the independent effects of each allele of the APOE gene that is the most significant risk factor for Alzheimer’s. We would do this by converting a patient and wild-type fibroblast into induced pluripotent stem cells. From this, we would edit a normal allele into the patient’s cell for rescue and the mutated allele in the wild-type cell for insertion, respectively. We would eventually differentiate these cells into neurons and astrocytes to study how the change of this allele can impact neural interaction. This was real science in progress, not enshrined in a textbook, but free, fluid, and vibrant. I slowly grew into my own independence around the lab. I found myself more confident and emotionally invested with each experiment, every immunostaining and PCR. Science, for all of its realism, had always seemed like the unimaginable fantasy to me. Through this opportunity, science has become more tangible, grounded in unglamorous details: hard work and deadlines, mistakes and mishaps, long lab meetings and missed lunches. Yet, that has only made me more confident that I want to pursue science. Now, I’m embracing a reality, one that gives me something worth striving for. In fact, I am very fortunate that my project has encountered numerous obstacles. My initial response to these problems was and still is a lot less Zen and a lot more panic-driven. But I’ve slowly come to realize the beauty of the troubleshooting process for progress. My project has been an emotional rollercoaster, as our rescue cell line met success, but couldn’t advance to the next stage. Our insertion cell line appeared to have incorporated the mutation, but it turned out it only incorporated one allele. It’s been a process of finding the balance between defending our ideas and accepting new ones, the border between defending and defensiveness. My curiosity and drive to improve, to understand, to conquer the unknown is learning to coexist with the need for patience and flexibility No matter how solid our theory should have been, reality is fickle and all the more interesting for it. I thought science was all about doubt and skepticism, questioning everything. Through this internship, I’ve learned that there’s also a surprising amount of faith, the faith to accept any setbacks as part of the discovery process. I thought I loved science before because I loved how enough facts could help me make sense of things. But through this internship in the lab, I’m learning to love a larger part of science, which is not only loving knowledge, but also loving not knowing, loving discovery for all of its uncertainty and perfect imperfections. I’m learning to grow into my lab coat, and hopefully, to find my place in the field of science.

Bridging the gap: training scientists to speak everyday English

Getting a start in your chosen career is never easy. Without experience it’s hard to get a job. And without a job you can’t get experience. That’s why the CIRM Bridges program was created, to help give undergraduate and Master’s level students a chance to get the experience they need to start a career in stem cell research.

Last week our governing Board approved a new round of funding for this program, ensuring it will continue for another 5 years.

But we are not looking to train just any student; we are looking to recruit and retain students who reflect the diversity of California, students who might not otherwise have a chance to work in a world-class stem cell research facility.

Want to know what that kind of student looks like? What kind of work they do? Well, the Bridges program at City College of San Francisco recently got its latest group of Bridges students to record an “elevator pitch”; that’s a short video where they explain what they do and why it’s important, in language anyone can understand.

They do a great job of talking about their research in a way that’s engaging and informative; no easy matter when you are discussing things as complex as using stem cells to test whether everyday chemicals can have a toxic impact on the developing brain, or finding ways to turn off the chromosome that causes Down’s syndrome.

Regular readers of the CIRM blog know we are huge supporters of anything that encourages scientists to be better communicators. We feel that anyone who gets public funding for their work has an obligation to be able to explain that work in words the public can understand. This is not just about being responsive, there’s also a certain amount of self-interest here. The better the public understands the work that scientists do, and how that might impact their health, the more they’ll support that work.

That’s why one of the new elements we have added to the Bridges program is a requirement for the students to engage in community outreach and education. We want them to be actively involved in educating diverse communities around California about the importance of stem cell research and the potential benefits for everyone.

We have also added a requirement for the students to be directly engaged with patients. Too often in the past students studied solely in the lab, learning the skills they’ll need for a career in science. But we want them to also understand whom these skills will ultimately benefit; people battling deadly diseases and disorders. The best way to do that is for the students to meet these people face-to-face, at a bone marrow drive or at a health fair for example.

When you have seen the face of someone in need, when you know their story, you are more motivated to find a way to help them. The research, even if it is at a basic level, is no longer about an abstract idea, it’s about someone you know, someone you have met.

Improving process drives progress in stem cell research

shutterstock_212888935Process is not a sexy word. No one gets excited thinking about improving a process. Yet behind every great idea, behind every truly effective program is someone who figured out a way to improve the process, to make that idea not just work, but work better.

It’s not glamorous. Sometimes it’s not even pretty. But it is essential.

Yesterday in Oakland our governing Board approved two new concepts to improve our process, to help us fund research in a way that is faster, smarter and ultimately helps us better meet our mission of accelerating the development of stem cell therapies for patients with unmet medical needs.

The new concepts are for Discovery – the earliest stage of research – and the Translational phase, a critical step in moving promising therapies out of the lab and toward clinical trials where they can be tested in people.

In a news release C. Randal Mills, Ph.D., CIRM’s President and CEO, said that these additions built on the work started when the agency launched CIRM 2.0 in January for the clinical phase of research:

“What makes this approach different is that under CIRM 2.0 we are creating a pathway for research, from Discovery to Translational and Clinical, so that if a scientist is successful with their research at one level they are able to move that ahead into the next phase. We are not interested in research just for its own sake. We are interested in research that is going to help us help patients.”

In the Discovery program, for example, we will now be able to offer financial incentives to encourage researchers who successfully complete their work to move it along into the Translational phase – either themselves or by finding a scientific partner willing to take it up and move it forward.

This does a number of things. First it helps create a pipeline for the most promising projects so ideas that in the past might have stopped once the initial study ended now have a chance to move forward. Obviously our hope is that this forward movement will ultimately lead to a clinical trial. That won’t happen with every research program we fund but this approach will certainly increase the possibility that it might.

There’s another advantage too. By scheduling the Discovery and Translational awards more regularly we are creating a grant system that has more predictability, making it easier for researchers to know when they can apply for funding.

We estimate that each year there will be up to 50 Discovery awards worth a total of $53 million; 12 Translation awards worth a total of $40 million; and 12 clinical awards worth around $100 million. That’s a total of more than $190 million every year for research.

This has an important advantage for the stem cell agency too. We have close to $1 billion left in the bank so we want to make sure we spend it as wisely as we can.

As Jonathan Thomas, Ph.D. J.D, the Chair of our Board, said, having this kind of plan helps us better plan our financial future;

“Knowing how often these programs are going to be offered, and how much money is likely to be awarded means the Board has more information to work with in making decisions on where best to allocate our funding.”

The Board also renewed funding for both the Bridges and SPARK (formerly Creativity) programs. These are educational and training programs aimed at developing the next generation of stem cell scientists. The Bridges students are undergraduate or Master’s level students. The SPARK students are all still in high school. Many in both groups come from poor or low-income communities. This program gives them a chance to work in a world-class stem cell research facility and to think about a career in science, something that for many might have been unthinkable without Bridges or SPARK.

Process isn’t pretty. But for the students who can now think about becoming a scientist, for the researchers who can plan new studies, and for the patients who can now envision a potential therapy getting into clinical trials, that process can make all the difference.