Protective cell therapy could mean insulin independence for diabetic patients

This has already been a productive year for diabetes research. Earlier this month, scientists from UCSF and the Gladstone Institutes successfully made functional human pancreatic beta cells from skin, providing a new and robust method for generating large quantities of cells to replace those lost in patients suffering from type 1 diabetes.

Today marks another breakthrough in the development of stem cell therapies for diabetes. Scientists from MIT and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute published a new method in Nature Medicine that encapsulates and protects stem cell-derived pancreatic beta cells in a way that prevents them from being attacked by the immune system after transplantation.

Protecting transplanted cells from the immune system

Stem cell therapy holds promise for diabetes for a number of reasons. First, scientists now have the ability to generate large numbers of insulin producing pancreatic beta cells from human skin and stem cells. This obviates the need for donor beta cells, which are always in short supply and high demand. Second, there’s the issue of the immune system. Transplanting beta cells from a donor into a patient will trigger an immunological reaction, which can only be abated by a lifetime regimen of immunosuppressive drugs.

One way that scientists have addressed the issue of immune rejection is to transplant stem cell-derived beta cells in a protected capsule. A CIRM-funded company called ViaCyte has developed a medical device that acts like a replacement pancreas but is surgically implanted under the skin. It contains human beta cells derived from embryonic stem cells and has a membrane barrier that allows only certain molecules to pass in and out of the device. This way, the foreign pancreatic cells are shielded from the immune system, but they can still respond to changing blood sugar levels in the patient by secreting insulin into the blood stream.

Another way that scientists trick the immune system in diabetes patients uses a similar strategy but instead of a medical device that protects a large population of cells, they encapsulate individual islets (clusters of beta cells) using biomaterials.

However, previous attempts using a biomaterial called alginate to encapsulate islets caused an immune response in the form of fibrosis, or scar tissue, and cell death. Additionally, transplanted alginate microspheres were only able to achieve glycemic control, or control of blood sugar levels, temporarily in animal models.

In the Nature Medicine study, the scientists developed a new method for beta cell encapsulation where they used a chemically modified version of the alginate microspheres – triazole-thiomorpholine dioxide (TMTD) – that didn’t cause an immune reaction and was able to maintain glycemic control in mice that had diabetes.

New protective method makes diabetic mice insulin independent

The scientists tested the conventional alginate microspheres and the modified TMTD-alginate microspheres containing embryonic stem cell-derived human beta islets in diabetic mice.

Encapsulated beta islets were transplanted into diabetic mice. (Nature Medicine)

Encapsulated beta islets were transplanted into diabetic mice. (Nature Medicine)

They found that the conventional smaller alginate microspheres caused fibrosis while larger TMTD-alginate microspheres did not. They observed that the modified TMTD-alginate microspheres were able to achieve glycemic control for over 70 days after transplantation while conventional microspheres didn’t perform as well.

The scientists also looked at the immune response to both types of alginate spheres. They saw lower numbers of immune cells and less fibrosis surrounding the transplanted TMTD microspheres compared to the conventional microspheres.

The final studies were the icing on the cake. The asked whether the modified TMTD microspheres were able to maintain long-term glycemic control or insulin independence, which would mean sustaining blood glucose levels in diabetic mice for over 100 days. They studied diabetic mice that received TMTD microspheres for 174 days. At 150 days, they performed a glucose test and saw that the diabetic mice were just as good at regulating glucose levels as normal mice. Furthermore, after 6 months, these mice showed no build up of fibrotic tissue, indicating that the modified microspheres weren’t causing an immune response and these mice didn’t need immunosuppressive drugs.

What the experts had to say…

This study was picked up by STATnews, which also mentioned another related study published in Nature Biotechnology that tested various alginate derivatives in rodent and monkey models of diabetes.

Julia Greenstein, vice president of discovery research at JDRF, discussed the implications of both studies with STATnews:

“This is really the first demonstration of the ability of these novel materials in combination with a stem-cell derived beta cell to reverse diabetes in an animal model. Our goal is to bring that kind of biological cure across the spectrum of type 1 diabetes.”

First author on both studies, Arturo Vegas, also gave his thoughts and discussed future applications:

Arturo Vegas

Arturo Vegas

“From very early on, we were getting great success. Everything kind of fell into place. You saw less foreign body response. The human beta cells survived exquisitely well. I think we’ve advanced the ball pretty far, almost as far you could get in an academic environment. The talk is shifting toward doing something clinically.”

According to STATnews, Vegas and his team are working on tests now in monkey models. “Vegas said that if the primate studies are successful, the next step will be developing a therapy to be used in people.”


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A Win for Diabetes: Scientists Make Functional Pancreatic Cells From Skin

Today is an exciting day for diabetes research and patients. For the first time, scientists have succeeded in making functional pancreatic beta cells from human skin. This new method for making the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas could produce a new, more effective treatment for patients suffering from diabetes.

Researchers at the Gladstone Institutes and the University of California, San Francisco published these promising findings today in the journal Nature Communications.

Making pancreatic cells from skin

They used a technique called direct reprogramming to turn human skin cells directly into pancreatic beta cells without having to go all the way back to a pluripotent stem cell state. The skin cells were treated with factors used to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and with pancreatic-specific molecules. This cocktail of factors and molecules shut off the skin genes and turned on genes of the pancreas.

The end product was endoderm progenitor cells, which are like stem cells but can only generate cell types specific to organs derived from the endoderm layer (for example: lungs, thyroid, pancreas). The scientists took these endoderm progenitors and further coaxed them into mature, pancreatic beta cells after treatment with another cocktail of molecules.

Functioning human pancreatic cells after they’ve been transplanted into a mouse. (Image: Saiyong Zhu, Gladstone)

Functioning human pancreatic cells after they’ve been transplanted into a mouse. (Image: Saiyong Zhu, Gladstone)

While the pancreatic cells they made looked and acted like the real thing in a dish (they were able to secrete insulin when exposed to glucose), the authors needed to confirm that they functioned properly in animals. They transplanted the mature beta cells into mice that were engineered to have diabetes, and observed that the human beta cells protected the mice from becoming diabetic by properly regulating their blood glucose levels.

Importantly, none of the mice receiving human cells got tumors, which is always a concern when transplanting reprogrammed cells or cells derived from pluripotent stem cells.

What does this mean?

This study is groundbreaking because it offers a new and more efficient method to make functioning human beta cells in mass quantities.

Dr. Sheng Ding, a CIRM funded senior investigator at the Gladstone and co-senior author, explained in a Gladstone news release:

Sheng Ding

Sheng Ding

“This new cellular reprogramming and expansion paradigm is more sustainable and scalable than previous methods. Using this approach, cell production can be massively increased while maintaining quality control at multiple steps. This development ensures much greater regulation in the manufacturing process of new cells. Now we can generate virtually unlimited numbers of patient-matched insulin-producing pancreatic cells.”

 

Matthias Hebrok, director of the Diabetes Center at UCSF and co-senior author on paper discussed the potential research and clinical applications of their findings:

Mattias Hebrok

Matthias Hebrok

“Our results demonstrate for the first time that human adult skin cells can be used to efficiently and rapidly generate functional pancreatic cells that behave similar to human beta cells. This finding opens up the opportunity for the analysis of patient-specific pancreatic beta cell properties and the optimization of cell therapy approaches.”

 

The study does mention the caveat that their direct reprogramming approach wasn’t able to generate all the cell types of the pancreas. Having these support cells would better recreate the pancreatic environment and likely improve the function of the transplanted beta cells.

Lastly, I find this study exciting because it kills two birds with one stone. Scientists can use this technique to make better cellular models of diabetes to understand why the disease happens, and they could also develop new cell replacement therapies in humans. Already, stem cell derived pancreatic beta cells are being tested in human clinical trials for type 1 diabetes (one of them is a CIRM-funded clinical trial by Viacyte) and it seems likely that beta cells derived from skin will follow suit.


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Type 1 Diabetes Trial Explained Whiteboard Video Style

There’s a saying, a picture is worth a thousand words. With complicated science however, pictures don’t always do these topics justice. Here’s where videos come to the rescue.

Florie Mar, founder of Youreka Science.

Florie Mar, founder of Youreka Science.

Today’s topic is type 1 diabetes and a CIRM-funded clinical trial headed by the San Diego company ViaCyte hoping to develop a cure for patients with this disease. Instead of writing an entire blog about the latest on this clinical trial, we are featuring an excellent video by Youreka Science. This nonprofit organization is the brainchild of former University of California, San Francisco graduate student Florie Mar who has a passion to bring scientific concepts to life to reach both students and the general public.

Youreka’s style uses whiteboard videos to explain disease and basic science research with drawings, words, and lay person-friendly narrative. This particular video, “Progress and Promise of Stem Cell Research: Type 1 Diabetes” was developed in collaboration with Americans for Cures and explains how CIRM-funded stem cell research is “leading to groundbreaking advances in diabetes.”

We are also excited about this ViaCyte trial as it’s being conducted in one of the CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinics located at the University of California, San Diego. The goal of the Alpha Clinics is to accelerate the development and delivery of stem cell therapies to patients by providing stem-cell focused clinics for conducting high quality trials.

In brief, the video explains ViaCyte’s stem cell derived therapy that replaces the insulin-producing cells that are lost in type 1 diabetes patients. For more details, check out the video!

 

And to hear from Viacyte’s chief scientific officer as well as two people living with type 1 diabetes, check out a CIRM video we produced a few years ago.


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New type of diabetes caused by old age may be treatable

I’m going to tell you a secret: I love sugar. I love it so much that as a little kid my mom used to tell me scary stories about how my teeth would fall out and that I might get diabetes one day if I ate too many sweets. Thankfully, none of these things happened. I have a full set of teeth (and they’re real), my blood sugar level is normal, and I’ve become one with the term “everything in moderation”.

I am not out of the woods, however: a newly discovered type of diabetes could strike in a few decades. A research team has found the cause of a type of diabetes that occurs because of old age, and a potential cure, at least in mice.

Diabetes comes in different flavors

People who suffer from diabetes (which is almost 30 million Americans) lack the ability to regulate the amount of sugar in their blood. The pancreas is the organ that regulates blood sugar by producing a hormone called insulin. If blood has a high sugar level, the pancreas releases insulin, which helps muscle, liver, and fat cells to absorb the excess sugar until the levels in the blood are back to normal.

There are two main forms of diabetes, type 1 and 2, both of which cause hyperglycemia or high blood sugar. Type 1 is an autoimmune disorder where the immune system attacks and kills the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. As a result, these type 1 diabetics aren’t able to produce insulin and endure a lifetime of daily insulin shots to manage their condition. Type 2 diabetes is the more common form of the disease and occurs when the body’s cells become unresponsive, or resistant, to insulin and stop absorbing sugar from the bloodstream.

The cause of type 1 diabetes is not known although genetic factors are sure to be involved. Type 2 diabetes can be caused by a combination of factors including poor diet, obesity, genetics, stress, and old age. Both forms of the disease can be fatal if not managed properly and raise the risk of other medical complications such as heart disease, blindness, ulcers, and kidney failure.

While type 1 or 2 diabetes make up the vast majority of the cases, there are actually other forms of this disease that we are only just beginning to understand. One of them is type 3, which is linked to Alzheimer’s disease. (To learn more about the link between AD and diabetes, read this blog.)

Old age can cause diabetes

Another form of diabetes, which is in the running for the title of type 4, is caused by old age. Unlike type 2 diabetes which also occurs in adults, type 4 individuals don’t have the typical associated risk factors like weight gain. The exact mechanism behind age-related type 4 diabetes in humans isn’t known, but a CIRM-funded study published today in Nature identified the cause of diabetes in older, non-obese mice.

Scientists from the Salk Institute compared the immune systems of healthy mice to lean mice with age-associated insulin resistance or mice with obesity-associated insulin resistance (the equivalent to type 2 diabetes in humans). When they studied the fat tissue in the three animal models, they noticed a striking difference in the number of immune cells called T regulatory cells (Tregs). These cells are the “keepers of the immune system”, and they keep inflammation and excessive activity of other immune cells to a minimum.

Lean mice with age-related diabetes, had a substantially larger number of Tregs in their fat tissue compared to obesity-related diabetic and normal mice. Instead of being their usual helpful selves, the overabundance of Tregs in the age-related diabetic mice caused insulin resistance.

Salk researchers show that diabetes in elderly, lean animals is caused by an overabundance of immune cells in fat. In this graphic, fat tissue is shown with representations of the immune cells called Tregs (orange). In aged mice with diabetes (represented on the right), Tregs are overexpressed in fat tissue and trigger insulin resistance. When Tregs are blocked, the fat cells in mice become insulin sensitive again. (Image courtesy of Salk Institute)

Diabetes in elderly, lean animals is caused by an overabundance of immune cells called Tregs (orange)  in fat tissue (brown cells). In aged mice with diabetes (right), Tregs are overexpressed in fat tissue and trigger insulin resistance. When Tregs are blocked, the fat cells in mice become insulin sensitive again. (Image courtesy of Salk Institute)

In a Salk Institute press release, lead author Sagar Bapat explained:

Normally, Tregs help calm inflammation. Because fat tissue is constantly broken down and built back up as it stores and releases energy, it requires low levels of inflammation to constantly remodel itself. But as someone ages, the new research suggests, Tregs gradually accumulate within fat. And if the cells reach a tipping point where they completely block inflammation in fat tissue, they can cause fat deposits to build up inside unseen areas of the body, including the liver, leading to insulin resistance.

A cure for type 4 diabetes, but in mice…

After they identified the cause, the authors next searched for a solution. They blocked the build up of Tregs in the fat tissue of age-related diabetic mice using an antibody drug that inhibits the production of Tregs. The drug successfully cured the age-related diabetic mice of their insulin resistance, but didn’t do the same for the obesity-related diabetic mice. The authors concluded that the two forms of diabetes have different causes and type 4 can be cured by removing excessive Tregs from fat tissue.

This study is only the beginning for understanding age-related diabetes. The authors next want to find out why Tregs accumulate in the fat tissue of older mice, and if they also build up in other tissues and organs. They are also curious to know if the same phenomenon happens in elderly humans who become diabetic but don’t have type 2 diabetes.

Understanding the cause of age-related diabetes in humans is of upmost importance to Ronald Evans who is the director of the Gene Expression Lab at the Salk Institute, and senior author on the study.

Ron Evans

Ron Evans

A lot of diabetes in the elderly goes undiagnosed because they don’t have the classical risk factors for type 2 diabetes, such as obesity. We hope our discovery not only leads to therapeutics, but to an increased recognition of type 4 diabetes as a distinct disease.

For more on this exciting study, check out a video interview of Dr. Evans from the Salk Institute:


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Seeing is believing: using video to explain stem cell science

People are visual creatures. So it’s no surprise that many of us learn best through visual means. In fact a study by the Social Science Research Network found that 65 percent of us are visual learners.

That’s why videos are such useful tools in teaching and learning, and that’s why when we came across a new video series called “Reaping the rewards of stem cell research” we were pretty excited. And to be honest there’s an element of self-interest here. The series focuses on letting people know all about the research funded by CIRM.

We didn’t make the videos, a group called Youreka Science is behind them. Nor did we pay for them. That was done by a group called Americans for Cures (the group is headed by Bob Klein who was the driving force behind Proposition 71, the voter-approved initiative that created the stem cell agency). Nonetheless we are happy to help spread the word about them.

The videos are wonderfully simple, involving just an engaging voice, a smart script and some creative artwork on a white board. In this first video they focus on our work in helping fund stem cell therapies for type 1 diabetes.

What is so impressive about the video is its ability to take complex ideas and make them easily understandable. On their website Youreka Science says they have a number of hopes for the videos they produce:

“How empowering would it be for patients to better understand the underlying biology of their disease and learn how new treatments work to fight their illness?

How enlightening would it be for citizens to be part of the discovery process and see their tax dollars at work from the beginning?

How rewarding would it be for scientists to see their research understood and appreciated by the very people that support their work?”

What I love about Youreka Science is that it began almost by chance. A PhD student at the University of California San Francisco was teaching some 5th graders about science and thought it would be really cool to have a way of bringing the textbook to life. So she did. And now we all get to benefit from this delightful approach.

The best scientists always want to know more

Sir Isaac Newton

Sir Isaac Newton

Some years ago I was in the Wren Library at Trinity College, Cambridge in England when I noticed a display case with a cloth over it. Being a naturally curious person, downright nosy in fact, I lifted the cloth. In the display case was a first edition of Sir Isaac Newton’s Principia Mathematica and in the margins were notes, corrections put there by Newton for the second edition.

It highlighted for me how the best scientists never stop working, never stop learning, never stop trying to improve what they do.

That came back to me when I saw a news release from ViaCyte, a company we are funding in a Phase 1 clinical trial to treat type 1 diabetes.  The news release announced results of a study showing that insulin-producing cells, created in the lab from embryonic stem cells, can not only mature but also function properly after being implanted in a capsule-like device and placed under the skin of an animal model.

VC-01-cross-section-5

Now the clinical trial we are funding with ViaCyte uses a similar, but slightly different set of cells in people. The device in the trial contains what ViaCyte calls PEC-01™ pancreatic progenitor cells. These are essentially an earlier stage of the mature pancreatic cells that our body uses to produce insulin. The hope is that when implanted in the body, the cells will mature and then behave like adult pancreatic cells, secreting insulin and other hormones to keep blood glucose levels stable and healthy.

Those cells and that device are being tested in people with type 1 diabetes right now.

Learning more

But in this study ViaCyte wanted to know if beta cells, a more mature version of the cells they are using in our trial, would also work or have any advantages over their current approach.

The good news, published in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine,  is that these cells did work. As they say in their news release:

“The animal study also demonstrated for the first time that when encapsulated in a device and implanted into mice, these more mature cells are capable of producing functional pancreatic beta cells. ViaCyte is also the first to show that these further differentiated cells can function in vivo following cryopreservation, a valuable process step when contemplating clinical and commercial application.”

This does not mean ViaCyte wants to change the cells it uses in the clinical trial. As President and CEO Paul Laikind, PhD, makes clear:

“For a number of reasons we believe that the pancreatic progenitor cells that are the active component of the VC01 product candidate are better suited for cell replacement therapy. However, the current work has expanded our fundamental knowledge of beta cell maturation and could lead to further advances for the field.”

And that’s what I mean about the best scientists are the ones who keeping searching, keeping looking for answers. It may not help them today, but who knows how important that work will prove in the future.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: Prostate cancer and BPA, mini organs and diabetes trial

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Latest mini-organ, a prostate, fingers BPA. A team at the University of Illinois, at Chicago, has added the prostate gland to the growing list of “organoids” that have been grown from stem cells in the lab. The tiny gland that produces semen in men has an unusually high rate of cancer compared to other organs. Prior research has linked that cancerous nature to exposure to the hormone estrogen during fetal growth, including synthetic estrogen mimics like the chemical BPA (bisphenol A) found in many plastics.

Unlike the other organs associated with male gender, which form very early in fetal development, the prostate develops later when stem cells’ roles are more narrowly defined to creating specific tissues. The team, led by Gail Prins, had previously shown that prostate stem cells grown in the presence of BPA formed cells more likely to show signs of cancer. But that did not allow them to determine what really triggered the increase in cancer. So, they decided to grow mini prostates and look at all the cells as they developed in the organoid.

“What we were doing originally with the human prostate stem cells is we were mixing and growing them in vivo,” Prins told Medical Daily. “The idea to generate this organoid came from the first author, Esther Calderon-Gierszal; she was my graduate student. ‘They’ve done it for other organs,’ she thought. ‘Let’s try it for a prostate.’”

The researchers pushed embryonic stem cells to grow into the several different tissues found in a prostate gland using a cocktail of hormones. Although much smaller than a normal prostate the cells did self-organize into structures that resembled the gland. When they grew the organoid in the presence of BPA they found an unusually large number of prostate specific stem cells. So, it appears just the increased number of stem cells increases the likelihood a few will go bad and form cancer.

A round up of all the mini-organs. The journal Nature has written a very accessible wrap up in its news section on all the various organs that have been simulated in a lab dish since a Japanese team reported the phenomenon for the first time in 2008. After a fun lead-in explaining the science, Cassandra Willyard runs through what has been accomplished so far in the stomach, kidney, and liver.

Part of a miniature stomach grown in the lab, stained to reveal various cells found in normal human stomachs [Credit: Kyle McCracken]

Part of a miniature stomach grown in the lab, stained to reveal various cells found in normal human stomachs [Credit: Kyle McCracken]

The fun in the opening section comes from the fact that given the right environment, stem cells are pretty darn good at self-organizing into the multiple tissue types that become a specific organ. So much so, that the early teams that saw it in the lab were shocked and did not at first know what they had.

Willyard starts with quotes from Madeline Lancaster, a post-doctoral fellow in a lab at the Institute for Molecular Biotechnology in Vienna, Austria. She found milky looking spheres in the lab cultures and when she cut into them she found multiple types of nerves. So she grabbed her mentor and reported:

“I’ve got something amazing. You’ve got to see it.”

She also discusses the work that led Hans Clevers, a researcher at Hubrecht Institute in Utrecht, the Netherlands, to report the creation of mini-guts in 20009. They grew the cells in a gel that resembled the structure that naturally surrounds cells. In this “at-home” environment stem cells formed much more complex tissue than he had hoped.

“The structures, to our total astonishment, looked like real guts,” Clevers said. “They were beautiful.”

The author also lets Clevers talk about taking his work the next step, using the gut organoids to screen for drugs for related diseases. If you have been following this work, Willyard’s piece is a must read.

Second clinical trial site for diabetes. Opening multiple clinical trial sites accelerates the process of determining whether a new therapy is safe and effective. So we were thrilled to get the announcement from ViaCyte that they would begin enrolling patients at a second location for the diabetes trial we helped them launch by funding the first clinical trial site at the University of California, San Diego.

That trial uses pancreatic cells grown from embryonic stem cells that are protected from immune attack by a semi-permeable pouch. The second site, at the University of Alberta Hospitals in Edmonton, Canada, is being funded in part by Alberta Innovates as well as by the JDRF Canadian Clinical Trials Network. JDRF also helps support the San Diego trial through its US office.

The lead researcher for the Alberta trial, James Shapiro, developed the procedure for transplanting pancreatic tissue from cadavers that became known as “the Edmonton Protocol.” That protocol has changed many lives, but because it requires life-long immunosuppression, doctors only recommend it for the most severe diabetics. The small number of donor pancreases also limits its use. Shapiro commented about the value and need for something like the ViaCyte therapy in a company press release picked up by Yahoo Finance, and dozens of other sites:

“The fact remains that new treatments are sorely needed, not only for the high risk patients but for all patients suffering from this life-altering disease.  The remarkable promise of the (ViaCyte) product candidate is that a virtually limitless source of appropriate human cells can be transplanted without the need for lifetime immunosuppression.”

Stem cell stories that caught our eye; cystic fibrosis, brain repair and Type 2 diabetes

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

“Organoids” screen for cystic fibrosis drugs
. Starting with iPS-type stem cells made by reprogramming skin cells from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients a team at the University of Cambridge in the U.K. created mini lungs in a dish. These organoids should provide a great tool for screening drugs to treat the disease.

The researchers pushed the stem cells to go through the early stages of embryo development and then on to become 3-D distal airway tissue, the part of the lung that processes gas exchange. They were able to use a florescent marker to show an aspect of the cells’ function that was different in cells from CF patients and those from normal individuals. When they treated the CF cells with a drug that is being tested in CF patients, they saw the function correct to the normal state.

Bioscience Technology
picked up the university’s press release about the work published in the journal Stem Cells and Development. It quotes the scientist who led the study, Nick Hannon, on the application of the new tool:

“We’re confident this process could be scaled up to enable us to screen tens of thousands of compounds and develop mini-lungs with other diseases such as lung cancer and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.”

To repair a brain knock its “pinky” down. A team at the University of California, San Francisco, has discovered a molecule that when it is shut down nerve stem cells can produce a whole lot more nerves. They call the molecule Pnky, named after the cartoon Pinky and the Brain.

Pinky_and_the_Brain_vol1Pkny belongs to a set of molecules known as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which researchers are finding are more abundant and more important than originally thought. The most familiar RNAs are the intermediary molecules between the DNA in our genes and the proteins that let our cells function. Initially, all the noncoding RNAs were thought to have no function, but in recent years many have been found to have critical roles in determining which genes are active. And Pnky seems to tamp down the activity of nerve stem cells. In a university press release picked up by HealthCanal Daniel Lim, the head researcher explained what happens when they shut down the gene:

“It is remarkable that when you take Pnky away, the stem cells produce many more neurons. These findings suggest that Pnky, and perhaps lncRNAs in general, could eventually have important applications in regenerative medicine and cancer treatment.”

Lim went onto explain the cancer connection. Since Pnky binds to a protein found in brain tumors, it might be involved in regulating the growth of brain tumors. A lot more work needs to happen before that hunch—or the use of Pnky blockers in brain injury—can lead to therapies, but this study certainly paints an intriguing path forward.

Stem cells and Type 2 diabetes. A few teams have succeeded in using stem cells to produce insulin-secreting tissue to correct Type 1 diabetes in animals, but it has been uncertain if the procedure would work for Type 2 diabetes. Type 1 is marked by a lack of insulin production, while resistance to the body’s own insulin, not lack of insulin, is the hallmark of type 2. A team at the University of British Columbia has new data showing stem cell therapy may indeed have a place in treating Type 2.

In mice fed a high fat diet until they developed the symptoms of Type 2 diabetes the stem cell-derived cells did help, but they did not fully correct the metabolism of the mice until they added one of the drugs commonly used to treat diabetes today. The drugs alone, also did not restore normal metabolism, which is often the case with human Type 2 diabetics.

The combination of drugs and cells improved the mice’s sugar metabolism, body weight and insulin sensitivity. The research appeared in the journal Stem Cell Reports and the University’s press release was picked up by several outlets including Fox News.

They transplanted cells from humans and even though the mice were immune suppressed, they took the added measure of protecting the cells in an encapsulation device. They noted that this would be required for use in humans and showing that it worked in mice would speed up any human trials. They also gave a shout out to the clinical trial CIRM funds at Viacyte, noting that since the Food and Drug Administration has already approved use of a similar device by Viacyte, the work might gain more rapid approval.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: Cancer genetics, cell fate, super donors and tale of road to diabetes cure

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

For cancer growth timing is everything. A study originating at the University of Southern California suggests tumors are born to be bad. Mutations constantly occur during the life of a tumor but those that occur early on determine if a tumor will grow as a benign mass of a cancerous one that spreads.

Describing the genetic markers the team found, the senior author, Christina Curtis, who recently moved to Stanford, was quoted in a story in ScienceBlog:

“What you see in the final cancer was there from the beginning.”

The CIRM funded team completed detailed genetic analysis of tumor cells surgically removed from colon cancer patients. Doctors treating these patients have long been hampered by an inability to tell which tumors will remain small and benign and which will develop into full-blown cancer. The researchers suggest the genetic fingerprints they have uncovered could lead to improved diagnosis for patients.

Physical forces also key to cell fate.
Putting the squeeze on stem cells may be what’s needed to get them to become bone. In this case, a team at the University of California, San Diego, used teeny tiny tweezers called “optical tweezers,” to trigger key internal signals that directed stem cells to go down the path to bone.

Pressure results in release of a cell signal shown in red

Pressure results in release of a cell signal shown in red

We have frequently written about the tremendous importance of a stem cell’s environment—its neighborhood if you will—in determining its fate. Yingxiao Wang, who led the study, described this role in a press release from the university picked up by ScienceNewsline:

“The mechanical environment around a stem cell helps govern a stem cell’s fate. Cells surrounded in stiff tissue such as the jaw, for example, have higher amounts of tension applied to them, and they can promote the production of harder tissues such as bone.”

He said the findings should help researchers trying to replicate the natural stem cell environment in the lab when they try to grow replacement tissues for patients.

Super donors could provide matching tissue.
One of the biggest challenges of using stem cells to replace damaged tissue is avoiding immune system rejection of the new cells. CIRM-grantee Cellular Dynamics International (CDI) announced this week that they have made key initial steps to creating a cell bank that could make this much easier.

Our bodies use molecules on the surface of our cells to identify tissue that is ours versus foreign such as bacteria. The huge variation in those molecules, called HLA, makes the matching needed for donor organ, or donor cells, more difficult than the New York Times Sunday crossword. But a few individuals posses an HLA combination that allows them to match to a large percent of the population.

CDI has now created clinical grade stem cell lines using iPS reprogramming of adult tissue from two such “super donors.” Just those two cell lines provide genetic matches for 19 percent of the population. The company plans to develop additional lines from other super donors with the goal of creating a bank that would cover 95 percent of the population.

Reuters picked up the company’s press release. CIRM does not fund this project, but we do fund another cell bank for which CDI is creating cells to better understand the causes of 11 diseases that have complex genetic origins

Narrative tells the tale of developing diabetes therapy. MIT Technology Review has published a well-told feature about the long road to creating a stem cell-based therapy for diabetes. Author Bran Alexander starts with the early days of the “stem cell wars” and carries the tale through treatment of the first patients in the CIRM-funded clinical trial being carried out by ViaCyte and the University of California, San Diego.

The piece quotes Viacyte’s chief scientific officer Kevin D’Amour about the long road:

“When I first came to ViaCyte 12 years ago, cell replacement through stem cells was so obvious. We all said, ‘Oh, that’s the low-hanging fruit.’ But it turned out to be a coconut, not an apple.”

But the article shows that with Viacyte’s product as well as others coming down the pike, that coconut has been cracked and real hope for diabetics lies inside.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: new ways to reprogram, shifting attitudes on tissue donation, and hockey legend’s miracle questioned

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Insulin-producing cells produced from skin. Starting with human skin cells a team at the University of Iowa has created iPS-type stem cells through genetic reprogramming and matured those stem cells into insulin-producing cells that successfully brought blood-sugar levels closer to normal when transplanted in mice.

University of Iowa researchers reprogrammed human skin cells to create iPS cells, which were then differentiated in a stepwise fashion to create insulin-producing cells. When these cells were transplanted into diabetic mice, the cells secreted insulin and reduced the blood sugar levels of the mice to normal or near-normal levels. The image shows the insulin-producing cells (right) and precursor cells (left). [Credit: University of Iowa]

University of Iowa researchers reprogrammed human skin cells to create iPS cells, which were then differentiated in a stepwise fashion to create insulin-producing cells. When these cells were transplanted into diabetic mice, the cells secreted insulin and reduced the blood sugar levels of the mice to normal or near-normal levels. The image shows the insulin-producing cells (right) and precursor cells (left).
[Credit: University of Iowa]

The cells did not completely restore blood-sugar levels to normal, but did point to the possibility of achieving that goal in the future, something the team leader Nicholas Zavazava noted in an article in the Des Moines Register, calling the work an “encouraging first step” toward a potential cure for diabetes.

The Register discussed the possibility of making personalized cells that match the genetics of the patient and avoiding the need for immune suppression. This has long been a goal with iPS cells, but increasingly the research community has turned to looking for options that would avoid immune rejection with donor cells that could be off-the-shelf and less expensive than making new cells for each patient.

Heart cells from reprogramming work in mice. Like several other teams, a group in Japan created beating heart cells from iPS-type stem cells. But they went the additional step of growing them into sheets of heart muscle that when transplanted into mice integrated into the animals own heart and beat to the same rhythm.

The team published the work in Cell Transplantation and the news agency AlianzaNews ran a story noting that it has previously been unclear if these cells would get in sync with the host heart muscle. The result provides hope this could be a route to repair hearts damaged by heart attack.

Patient attitudes on donating tissue. A University of Michigan study suggests most folks don’t care how you use body tissue they donate for research if you ask them about research generically. But their attitudes change when you ask about specific research, with positive responses increasing for only one type of research: stem cell research.

On the generic question, 69 percent said go for it, but when you mentioned the possibility of abortion research more than half said no and if told the cells might lead to commercial products 45 percent said nix. The team published their work in the Journal of the American Medical Association and HealthCanal picked up the university’s press release that quoted the lead researcher, Tom Tomlinson, on why paying attention to donor preference is so critical:

“Biobanks are becoming more and more important to health research, so it’s important to understand these concerns and how transparent these facilities need to be in the research they support.”

CIRM has begun building a bank of iPS-type stem cells made from tissue donated by people with one of 11 diseases. We went through a very detailed process to develop uniform informed consent forms to make sure the donors for our cell bank knew exactly how their cells could be used. Read more about the consent process here.

Mainstream media start to question hockey legend’s miracle. Finally some healthy skepticism has arrived. Hockey legend Gordie Howe’s recovery from a pair of strokes just before the holidays was treated by the general media as a true Christmas miracle. The scientific press tried to layer the coverage with some questions of what we don’t know about his case but not the mainstream media. The one exception I saw was Brad Fikes in the San Diego Union Tribune who had to rely on a couple of scientists who were openly speaking out at the time. We wrote about their concerns then as well.

Now two major outlets have raised questions in long pieces back-to-back yesterday and this morning. The Star in hockey-crazed Canada wrote the first piece and New York Magazine wrote today’s. Both raise serious questions about whether stem cells could have been the cause of Howe’s recovery and are valuable additions to the coverage.