In living color: new imaging technique tracks traveling stem cells

Before blood stem cells can mature, before they can grow and multiply into the red blood cells that feed our organs, or the white blood cells that protect us from pathogens, they must go on a journey.

A blood stem cell en route to taking root in a zebrafish. [Credit: Boston Children's Hospital]

A blood stem cell en route to taking root in a zebrafish. [Credit:
Boston Children’s Hospital]

This journey, which takes place in the developing embryo, moves blood stem cells from their place of origin to where they will take root to grow and mature. That this journey happened was well known to scientists, but precisely how it happened remained shrouded in darkness.

But now, for the first time, scientists at Boston Children’s Hospital have literally shone a light on the entire process. In so doing, they have opened the door to improving surgical procedures that also rely on the movement of blood cells—such as bone marrow transplants, which are in essence stem cell transplants.

Reporting in today’s issue of the journal Cell, Boston Children’s senior investigator Leonard Zon and his team developed a way to visually track the trip that blood stem cells take in the developing embryo. As described in today’s news release, the same process that guides blood stem cells to the right place also occurs during a bone marrow transplant. The similarities between the two, therefore, could lead to more successful bone marrow transplants. According to the study’s co-first author Owen Tamplin:

“Stem cell and bone marrow transplants are still very much a black box—cells are introduced into a patient and later on we can measure recovery of the blood system, but what happens in between can’t be seen. Now we have a system where we can actually watch that middle step.”

And in the following video, Zon describes exactly how they did it:

As outlined in the above video, Zon and his team developed a transparent version of the zebrafish, a tiny model organism that is often used by scientists to study embryonic development. They then labeled blood stem cells in this transparent fish with a special fluorescent dye, so that the cells glowed green. And finally, with the help of both confocal and electron microscopy, they sat back and watched the blood stem cell take root in what’s called its niche—in beautiful Technicolor.

“Nobody’s ever visualized live how a stem cell interacts with its niche,” explained Zon. “This is the first time we get a very high-resolution view of the process.”

Further experiments found that the process in zebrafish closely resembled the process in mice—an indication that the same basic system could exist for humans.

With that possibility in mind, Zon and his team already have a lead on a way to improve the success of human bone marrow transplants. In chemical screening experiments, the team identified a chemical compound called lycorine that boosts the interaction between the zebrafish blood stem cell and its niche—thus promoting the number of blood stem cells as the embryo matures.

Does the lycorine compound (or an equivalent) exist to boost blood stem cells in mice? Or even in humans? That remains to be seen. But with the help of the imaging technology used by Zon and the Boston Children’s team—they have a good chance of being able to see it.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: EU approves a cell therapy, second ALS treatment shows promise and new gut cells work

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Europe approves first 2nd generation stem cell therapy.
While blood stem cells in bone marrow have been used to treat patients with certain blood cancers for more than 40 years, it has been a long wait for other uses of stem cells to gain official nods from regulatory bodies. The first came in 2012 when Canada approved Prochymal a stem cell therapy for kids who have a severe immune reaction after bone marrow transplant for cancer. That therapy helps the patients regulate their immune response and can be life saving.

Now the European Medicines Agency has approved a therapy for repairing eyes with damaged corneas—the first of a new generation of stem cell therapies that replace or repair specific tissues. The therapy uses a type of stem cell found in the eye called a limbal stem cell. An Italian team pioneered the procedure that has successfully restored vision to scores of patients whose eyes were damaged by chemicals or burns. An official with the EMA noted the significance of this approval in an agency press release.

“This recommendation represents a major step forward in delivering new and innovative medicines to patients.”

The BBC broke the news with a brief story, and MSN followed up with a bit more detail. (And no, this did not happen “this week” but it did happen after we went dark for the holidays.) CIRM also funds work with limbal stem cells.

Second type of stem cells shows benefit for ALS patients. Over the past couple years we have been writing about positive early trial results from Neuralstem for its therapy using a nerve stem cell for treating patients with ALS, also called Lou Gehrig’s disease. This week the company Brainstorm reported data showing improvement in most of the patients treated with a type of stem cell found in bone marrow and fat, mesenchymal stem cells.

The Neuralstem trials used donor stem cells and the Brainstorm trial uses a patient’s own cells, hence the drug name NeuOwn. But they have be revved up in the lab so that they secrete large quantities of what are called neurotrophic factors, chemicals that seem to protect nerves from damage by the disease and potentially foster healing of already damaged nerves.

Eleven of 12 patients experienced a decrease in the rate of progression of this normally very aggressive disease. The Israeli company completed its early trials in Israel but began a second stage trial at Massachusetts General Hospital in April. Reuters ran a story about the announcement.

New intestine engineered from stem cells. CIRM-grantee Tracy Grikscheit has previously reported growing tissues that look like intestinal cells and that have all the right cellular dog tags of our guts. Today the university announced she has shown she can grow tissues that actually function like our guts. They can absorb life-sustaining nutrients.

Because her work focuses on the devastating condition that results when a baby is born with insufficient intestine, it was not surprising this morning to find a good story about her work on the web site MotherBoard. The site quotes her on the latest advance:

“What’s important about this study is it’s not just taking pictures of the cells and saying ok, they’re in the proper location. We’re actually also looking at the function, so we’re showing that not only are the cells present that would for example absorb the sugar in your breakfast, but they actually are doing that job of absorbing sugar.”

Grikscheit works at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and you can read about her CIRM-funded work to build new intestine here.


Luck’s role in stem cell mutations key to cancer.
Most of the popular talk about risk and cancer centers on inheriting bad genes and being exposed to nasty chemicals in our daily lives. But a new study says the biggest risk is more akin to a roulette wheel.

A study published in Science by a team at Johns Hopkins looked at 31 types of tissue in our bodies and found that random mutations that occur while our tissue-specific stem cells divide correlates better with cancer risk than what we inherit or environmental risks combined. The Scientist produced one of the more thoughtful pieces of the many on the research that appeared in the media this week.

A personal story about getting into stem cell research. I enjoy hearing about how people get into this fascinating field and the media team at the University of Southern California has provided a good example. They profile recent recruit, Michael Bonaguidi who explains how he made the switch from physical to biological science:

“Growing up on Legos and Lincoln Logs, I was very fascinated with building things. As I took more biology courses and was exposed to other facets of science — from chemistry to physics — I became more interested not in the outside but within. And that’s what got me into bioengineering versus structural engineering.”

Described as shaping brains instead of cities he is looking for the types of cells that can rebuild the brain after injury or stroke. HealthCanal picked up the university’s feature.

Scientists identify gene that causes good protein to turn bad

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There exists a protein that, most of the time, helps keep the growth of cancer cells in check. But every so often it does the opposite—with potentially deadly consequences.

But now, researchers have discovered precisely why this protein, known as TGF-beta, can perform such an abrupt about-face. The results, published today in the journal Science Signaling, shed light on potential therapies that can succeed where others have failed—and attack the most aggressive forms of cancer.

TGF-beta is a type of tumor suppressor, a protein that normally keeps cells from growing, dividing and multiplying too quickly, which is how most tumors originate. But scientists have long observed that in many forms of cancer, TGF-beta has switched sides: it becomes a tumor promoter fostering the out-of-control growth of cells.

In this study, scientists at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have figured out that a gene called Bub1 seems to be pulling the strings—essentially flipping the switch on TGF-beta. The finding that Bub1 played such an important role in regulating TGF-beta caught the team completely off guard. According to the paper’s senior author Alnawaz Rehemtulla:

“Bub1 is well-known for its role in cell division. But this is the first study that links it to TGF-beta. We think this may explain the paradox of TGF-beta as a tumor promoter and a tumor suppressor.”

The team reached this conclusion by screening gene candidates against lung cancer and breast cancer cells. After screening over 700 genes, they narrowed down the potential gene to Bub1.

Further experiments revealed that Bub1 physically binds to TGF-beta, turning it to a tumor promoter in the process. And when the team prevented Bub1 from binding to TFG-beta, essentially blocking it, TGF-beta never turned sides.

These initial results have left the research team optimistic, in large part because Bub1 is known to be active, or ‘expressed,’ in so many forms of cancer. So, if they can find a way to block Bub1 in one type of cancer, they may be able to do so with other types.

Even at this early stage, the team has developed a compound that could block Bub1. Initial lab tests show that this so-called Bub1 ‘inhibitor’ could shut off the gene without affecting surrounding regions. Said Rehemtulla:

“When you look at gene expression in cancer, Bub1 is in the top five…. But we never knew why. Now that we have that link, we’re a step closer to shutting down this cycle.”

Stem Cell Stories that Caught Your Eye: The Most Popular Stem Cellar Stories of 2014

2014 marked an extraordinary year for regenerative medicine and for CIRM. We welcomed a new president, several of our research programs have moved into clinical trials—and our goal of accelerating treatments for patients in need is within our grasp.

As we look back we’d like to revisit The Stem Cellar’s ten most popular stories of 2014. We hope you enjoyed reading them as much as we did reporting them. And from all of us here at the Stem Cell Agency we wish you a Happy Holidays and New Year.

10. UCSD Team Launches CIRM-Funded Trial to Test Safety of New Leukemia Drug

9. Creating a Genetic Model for Autism, with a Little Help from the Tooth Fairy

8. A Tumor’s Trojan Horse: CIRM Researchers Build Nanoparticles to Infiltrate Hard-to-Reach Tumors

7. CIRM funded therapy for type 1 diabetes gets FDA approval for clinical trial

6. New Videos: Living with Crohn’s Disease and Working Towards a Stem Cell Therapy

5. Creativity Program Students Reach New Heights with Stem Cell-Themed Rendition of “Let it Go”

4. Scientists Reach Yet Another Milestone towards Treating Type 1 Diabetes

3. Meet the Stem Cell Agency President C. Randal Mills

2. Truth or Consequences: how to spot a liar and what to do once you catch them

1. UCLA team cures infants of often-fatal “bubble baby” disease by inserting gene in their stem cells; sickle cell disease is next target

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: organ replacement, ovarian cancer and repairing damaged hearts.

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Numbers on organ shortage and review of lab replacements.
Vox, the four-month-old web site, is rapidly becoming a credible news source with more than five million page views so far. With a reputation for explaining the facts behind the news, it was nice to see they tackled the organ shortage and how researchers are using stem cells to try to solve it.

organ shortage.0After providing data on the incredible need, the author addressed several key advances, as well as remaining hurdles, to using stem cells to build replacement organs in the lab. She notes that an important step to growing an organ is being able to grow all the various types of cells that make up a complex organ.

“Each specialized type of cell in your body needs certain chemical clues from its environment in order to thrive and multiply. And even a simple-seeming body part, like a urethra, requires more than one cell type, arranged in certain ways relative to one another.”

In addition to a chart with data on organ donation and need, the article provides a link to a fun video on growing a rat lung in the lab. The author closes with the fact that the greatest need is for kidneys and a discussion of how tough they are to make because of the complex mix of tissues needed.

An advance in building kidneys also made the journals this week, with a press release from Cellular Dynamics describing how their lab grown cells succeeded in coating the inside of blood vessels in a scaffold for a rodent kidney.

Stem cell factors heal damaged hearts. The American Heart Association met in Chicago this week and as always the week of their fall enclave generates several news stories. Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News wrote up a study from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York that suggested how your own stem cells might be recruited to repair damage after a heart attack.

The New York team used a form of gene therapy that introduced the genes for “stem cell factors” that they believe could summon a type of stem cell that some have suggested can repair heart muscle. Although, whether those cells, called c-Kit positive heart stem cells, are actually the cause of the repair remains a subject of debate. They did show that their treatment improved heart function and decreased heart muscle death in the rodent model they were using.

Stem cells improve survival of skin grafts.
With so many soldiers returning from deployments needing reconstructive surgery, several teams at our armed services medical institutes are trying to solve the problem of the soldiers’ immune systems rejecting large skin grafts from donors. One team reported a potentially major advance in the Journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine and the web site benzinga picked up the journal’s press release.

Working in mice the team got the best skin graft survival in animals that received two types of stem cells to induce immune tolerance to the graft. The mice received fat-derived stem cells from humans and an infusion of a small number of their own bone marrow stem cells. The grafts showed no sign of rejection after 200 days, a very long time in a mouse’s life. In the press release, the editor of the journal, Anthony Atala, suggested the results could have broad implications for the field.

“The implications of this research are broad. If these findings are duplicated in additional models and in human trials, there is potential to apply this strategy to many areas of transplantation.”

Leukemia drug may also work in ovarian cancer. The antibody named for CIRM in recognition of our funding of its discovery, cirmtuzumab, which is already in clinical trials in humans for leukemia, may also be effective in one of the most stubborn tumors, ovarian cancer.

Ovarian cancer cells

Ovarian cancer cells

The University of California, San Diego, team led by Thomas Kipps published a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week showing that in mice the antibody kept transplanted human ovarian cancer cells in check. The tumor that is characterized by rapid spread did not metastasize at all. HealthCanal picked up the university’s press release explaining how the new drug works. You can read about the CIRM-funded clinical trial in leukemia in our fact sheet.

Versatile fingernail stem cells.
The stem cells that regrow our nails are prodigious little critters forcing us to constantly cut or file. But it turns out they are also versatile. They can stimulate nail growth but also growth of skin around the nail.

But if our nails get injured they become single minded and only make nail cells. A team at the University of Southern California has discovered that at the time of injury a particular protein signal gets turned on directing the stem cells to focus on the nails. So, the team is now looking for other signaling proteins that might direct these versatile cells to make other tissues making them potential tools for healing amputations. ScienceDaily picked up the university’s press release.

Don Gibbons

10 Years/10 Therapies: 10 Years after its Founding CIRM will have 10 Therapies Approved for Clinical Trials

In 2004, when 59 percent of California voters approved the creation of CIRM, our state embarked on an unprecedented experiment: providing concentrated funding to a new, promising area of research. The goal: accelerate the process of getting therapies to patients, especially those with unmet medical needs.

Having 10 potential treatments expected to be approved for clinical trials by the end of this year is no small feat. Indeed, it is viewed by many in the industry as a clear acceleration of the normal pace of discovery. Here are our first 10 treatments to be approved for testing in patients.

HIV/AIDS. The company Calimmune is genetically modifying patients’ own blood-forming stem cells so that they can produce immune cells—the ones normally destroyed by the virus—that cannot be infected by the virus. It is hoped this will allow the patients to clear their systems of the virus, effectively curing the disease.

Spinal cord injury patient advocate Katie Sharify is optimistic about the latest clinical trial led by Asterias Biotherapeutics.

Spinal cord injury patient advocate Katie Sharify is optimistic about the clinical trial led by Asterias Biotherapeutics.

Spinal Cord Injury. The company Asterias Biotherapeutics uses cells derived from embryonic stem cells to heal the spinal cord at the site of injury. They mature the stem cells into cells called oligodendrocyte precursor cells that are injected at the site of injury where it is hoped they can repair the insulating layer, called myelin, that normally protects the nerves in the spinal cord.

Heart Disease. The company Capricor is using donor cells derived from heart stem cells to treat patients developing heart failure after a heart attack. In early studies the cells appear to reduce scar tissue, promote blood vessel growth and improve heart function.

Solid Tumors. A team at the University of California, Los Angeles, has developed a drug that seeks out and destroys cancer stem cells, which are considered by many to be the reason cancers resist treatment and recur. It is believed that eliminating the cancer stem cells may lead to long-term cures.

Leukemia. A team at the University of California, San Diego, is using a protein called an antibody to target cancer stem cells. The antibody senses and attaches to a protein on the surface of cancer stem cells. That disables the protein, which slows the growth of the leukemia and makes it more vulnerable to other anti-cancer drugs.

Sickle Cell Anemia. A team at the University of California, Los Angeles, is genetically modifying a patient’s own blood stem cells so they will produce a correct version of hemoglobin, the oxygen carrying protein that is mutated in these patients, which causes an abnormal sickle-like shape to the red blood cells. These misshapen cells lead to dangerous blood clots and debilitating pain The genetically modified stem cells will be given back to the patient to create a new sickle cell-free blood supply.

Solid Tumors. A team at Stanford University is using a molecule known as an antibody to target cancer stem cells. This antibody can recognize a protein the cancer stem cells carry on their cell surface. The cancer cells use that protein to evade the component of our immune system that routinely destroys tumors. By disabling this protein the team hopes to empower the body’s own immune system to attack and destroy the cancer stem cells.

Diabetes. The company Viacyte is growing cells in a permeable pouch that when implanted under the skin can sense blood sugar and produce the levels of insulin needed to eliminate the symptoms of diabetes. They start with embryonic stem cells, mature them part way to becoming pancreas tissues and insert them into the permeable pouch. When transplanted in the patient, the cells fully develop into the cells needed for proper metabolism of sugar and restore it to a healthy level.

HIV/AIDS. A team at The City of Hope is genetically modifying patients’ own blood-forming stem cells so that they can produce immune cells—the ones normally destroyed by the virus—that cannot be infected by the virus. It is hoped this will allow the patients to clear their systems of the virus, effectively curing the disease

Blindness. A team at the University of Southern California is using cells derived from embryonic stem cell and a scaffold to replace cells damaged in Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. The therapy starts with embryonic stem cells that have been matured into a type of cell lost in AMD and places them on a single layer synthetic scaffold. This sheet of cells is inserted surgically into the back of the eye to replace the damaged cells that are needed to maintain healthy photoreceptors in the retina.

More Than Meets the Eye: Protein that Keeps Cancer in Check also Plays Direct Role in Stem Cell Biology, a Stanford Study Finds.

Here’s a startling fact: the retinoblastoma protein —Rb, for short — is defective or missing in nearly all cancers.

Rb is called a tumor suppressor because it prevents excessive cell growth by acting as a crucial traffic stop for the cell cycle, a process that controls the timing for a cell to divide and multiply. Without a working Rb protein, that traffic barrier on cell division is effectively removed, allowing unrestricted cell growth and a path towards cancer.

Retinoblastoma - a known road block to cancer growth also inhibits a stem cell's capacity to change into any cell type

Retinoblastoma – a known road block to cancer growth also inhibits a stem cell’s capacity to change into any cell type

The Rb gene was cloned over two decades ago and its link to cancer has been known for years. But today in Cell Stem Cell, CIRM-funded scientists at Stanford University report an unexpected finding: Rb protein also inhibits a stem cell’s pluripotency, or it’s capacity to become any type of cell in the body. Julien Sage, a senior author of the report, described this new facet to Rb in a press release:

“We were very surprised to see that retinoblastoma directly connects control of the cell cycle with pluripotency. This is a completely new idea as to how retinoblastoma functions.”

The research team uncovered Rb’s versatility in experiments using the induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) technique in which adult cells, such as a skin, are reprogrammed to an embryonic stem cell-like state that, in turn, can be transformed into any cell type.

Creating iPS cells is notoriously slow and inefficient. However, the Stanford scientists found that cells without Rb were much easier and faster to convert to iPS than cells with normal Rb. And when Rb protein levels in the cells were boosted, it was much more difficult to make the iPS cells — suggesting that the presence of Rb was encouraging the skin cells to remain skin and to resist reprogramming into an iPS cell. As Marius Wernig, the other senior author, sums it up:

“The loss of Rb appears to directly change a cell’s identity. Without the protein, the cell is much more developmentally fluid and is easier to reprogram into an iPS cell.”

And Dr. Sage further points out that:

“The process of creating iPS cells from fully differentiated, or specialized, cells is in many ways very similar to what happens when a cell becomes cancerous.”

So now that the team has established the Rb protein’s direct link between stem cell and cancer biology, they stand at unique vantage point to gain new insights on the inner workings of both, such as better iPS methods and new cancer therapy targets.

To hear about more aspects of Marius Wernig’s research, watch his 30 second elevator pitch below:

Unlocking the Wonder Drug’s Secrets: Aspirin Fends Off Colon Cancer by Killing Faulty Intestinal Stem Cells

Over 700,000 people worldwide died from colorectal cancer in 2010, up from 500,000 in 1990, making it the fourth leading cause of cancer death behind lung, stomach and liver.

Remarkably, your household bottle of aspirin – in addition to relieving the common headache – protects against colorectal cancer based on several clinical trials over the past few decades. Though its effect is clear, how exactly aspirin prevents colon cancer has remained murky.

Who cares how it works as long as it saves lives, right?

Ball and stick model of aspirin, the wonder drug: relieves pain and prevents cancer

Ball and stick model of the wonder drug, aspirin. It not only relieves pain but also prevents heart attacks and even cancer.

Well, it turns out that long-term daily use of aspirin carries risks of internal bleeding of the stomach and brain, kidney failure, and certain types of strokes. So unraveling what exactly aspirin does to fend off tumors is an important step to finding new drugs with fewer side effects.

Earlier this week, scientists at University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) reported that they’ve unlocked the secrets of aspirin’s tumor-killing powers. In their study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the UPCI team shows that aspirin prevents colon cancer by orchestrating the death of stem cells in the intestine that carry a dangerous mutation.

Most colorectal cancers initially crop up with a mutation in a gene called APC. The APC protein is a so-called tumor suppressor, which acts to keep a lid on any uncontrolled cell division, an early step to tumor growth. So a bad APC gene leads to a faulty APC protein and, in turn, the potential for normal intestinal cells to become cancerous. The intestine has a rich source of stem cells, which are particularly vulnerable to this mutation since stem cells already possess the ability for unlimited cell growth.

The research team compared colorectal tumor samples from patients who had taken aspirin to those who had not. Using these samples in animal studies, the researchers showed that aspirin triggers cell suicide in intestinal stem cells that carry the APC mutation, effectively killing off the cells with the potential of feeding tumor growth. Healthy intestinal cells, on the other hand, are left unscathed by aspirin.

With this important discovery of cell suicide, or programmed cell death in scientific jargon, as the instigator of aspirin’s ability to prevent colon cancer, the research team finds themselves at an exciting new starting line to find drugs for cancer patients with less harmful side effects.

As the senior author Lin Zhang states in a university press release:

“We want to use our new understanding of this mechanism as a starting point to design better drugs and effective cancer prevention strategies for those at high risk of colon cancer.”

What everybody needs to know about CIRM: where has the money gone

It’s been almost ten years since the voters of California created the Stem Cell Agency when they overwhelmingly approved Proposition 71, providing us $3 billion to help fund stem cell research.

In the last ten years we have made great progress – we will have ten projects that we are funding in or approved to begin clinical trials by the end of this year, a really quite remarkable achievement – but clearly we still have a long way to go. However, it’s appropriate as we approach our tenth anniversary to take a look at how we have spent the money, and how much we have left.

Of the $3 billion Prop 71 generates around $2.75 billion was set aside to be awarded to research, build laboratories etc. The rest was earmarked for things such as staff and administration to help oversee the funding and awards.

Of the research pool here’s how the numbers break down so far:

  • $1.9B awarded
  • $1.4B spent
  • $873M not awarded

So what’s the difference between awarded and spent? Well, unlike some funding agencies when we make an award we don’t hand the researcher all the cash at once and say “let us know what you find.” Instead we set a series of targets or milestones that they have to reach and they only get the next installment of the award as they meet each milestone. The idea is to fund research that is on track to meet its goals. If it stops meetings its goals, we stop funding it.

Right now our Board has awarded $1.9B to different institutions, companies and researchers but only $1.4B of that has gone out. And of the remainder we estimate that we will get around $100M back either from cost savings as the projects progress or from programs that are cancelled because they failed to meet their goals.

So we have approximately $1B for our Board to award to new research, which means at our current rate of spending we’ll have enough money to be able to continue funding new projects until around 2020. Because these are multi-year projects we will continue funding them till around 2023 when those projects end and, theoretically at least, we run out of money.

But we are already working hard to try and ensure that the well doesn’t run dry, and that we are able to develop other sources of funding so we can continue to support this work. Without us many of these projects are at risk of dying. Having worked so hard to get these projects to the point where they are ready to move out of the laboratory and into clinical trials in people we don’t want to see them fall by the wayside for lack of support.

Of the $1.9B we have awarded, that has gone to 668 awards spread out over five different categories:

CIRM spending Oct 2014

Increasingly our focus is on moving projects out of the lab and into people, and in those categories – called ‘translational’ and ‘clinical’ – we have awarded almost $630M in funding for more than 80 active programs.

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Under our new CIRM 2.0 plan we hope to speed up the number of projects moving into clinical trials. You can read more about how we plan on doing there in this blog.

It took Jonas Salk almost 15 years to develop a vaccine for polio but those years of hard work ended up saving millions of lives. We are working hard to try and achieve similar results on dozens of different fronts, with dozens of different diseases. That’s why, in the words of our President & CEO Randy Mills, we come to work every day as if lives depend on us, because lives depend on us.

From Stem Cells to Stomachs: Scientists Generate 3D, Functioning Human Stomach Tissue

The human stomach can be a delicate organ. For example, even the healthiest stomach can be compromised by H. pylori bacteria—a tiny but ruthless pathogen which has shown to be linked to both peptic ulcer disease and stomach cancer.

The best way to study how an H. pylori infection leads to conditions like cancer would be to recreate that exact environment, right down to the stomach itself, in the lab. But that task has proven far more difficult than originally imagined.

Part of a miniature stomach grown in the lab, stained to reveal various cells found in normal human stomachs [Credit: Kyle McCracken]

Part of a miniature stomach grown in the lab, stained to reveal various cells found in normal human stomachs [Credit: Kyle McCracken]

But now, scientists at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have successfully grown functional, human stomach tissue in a dish—the first time such a feat has been accomplished.

Further, they were then able to test how human stomach tissue reacts to an invasion by H. pylori—a huge leap forward toward one day developing treatments for potentially deadly stomach disease.

Reporting in today’s issue of the journal Nature, senior author Jim Wells describes his team’s method of turning human pluripotent stem cells into stomach cells, known as gastric cells. Wells explained the importance of their breakthrough in a news release:

“Until this study, no one had generated gastric cells from human pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we discovered how to promote formation of three-dimensional gastric tissue with complex architecture and cellular composition.”

The team called this stomach tissue gastric organoids, a kind of ‘mini-stomach’ that mimicked the major cellular processes of a normal, functioning human stomach. Developing a human model of stomach development—and stomach disease—has long been a goal among scientists and clinicians, as animal models of the stomach did not accurately reflect what would be happening in a human stomach.

In this study, the research team identified the precise series of steps that can turn stem cells into gastric cells. And then they set these steps in motion.

Over the course of a month, the team coaxed the formation of gastric organoids that measured less than 1/10th of one inch in diameter. But even with this small size, the team could view the cellular processes that drive stomach formation—and discover precisely what happens when that process goes awry.

But what most intrigued the researchers, which also included first author University of Cincinnati’s Kyle McCracken, was how quickly an H. pylori infection impacted the health of the stomach tissue.

“Within 24 hours, the bacteria had triggered biochemical changes in the organ,” said McCracken.

According to McCracken, as the H. pylori infection spread from cell to cell, the researchers also recorded the activation of c-Met, a gene known to be linked to stomach cancer—further elucidating the relationship between H. pylori and this form of stomach disease.

Somewhat surprisingly, little was known about how gastric cells play a role in obesity-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. But thanks to Wells, McCracken and the entire Cincinnati Children’s research team—we are that much closer to shedding light on this process.

Wells also credits his team’s reliance on years of preliminary data performed in research labs around the world with helping them reach this landmark:

“This milestone would not have been possible if it hadn’t been for previous studies from many other basic researchers on understanding embryonic organ development.”