10 Years/10 Therapies: 10 Years after its Founding CIRM will have 10 Therapies Approved for Clinical Trials

In 2004, when 59 percent of California voters approved the creation of CIRM, our state embarked on an unprecedented experiment: providing concentrated funding to a new, promising area of research. The goal: accelerate the process of getting therapies to patients, especially those with unmet medical needs.

Having 10 potential treatments expected to be approved for clinical trials by the end of this year is no small feat. Indeed, it is viewed by many in the industry as a clear acceleration of the normal pace of discovery. Here are our first 10 treatments to be approved for testing in patients.

HIV/AIDS. The company Calimmune is genetically modifying patients’ own blood-forming stem cells so that they can produce immune cells—the ones normally destroyed by the virus—that cannot be infected by the virus. It is hoped this will allow the patients to clear their systems of the virus, effectively curing the disease.

Spinal cord injury patient advocate Katie Sharify is optimistic about the latest clinical trial led by Asterias Biotherapeutics.

Spinal cord injury patient advocate Katie Sharify is optimistic about the clinical trial led by Asterias Biotherapeutics.

Spinal Cord Injury. The company Asterias Biotherapeutics uses cells derived from embryonic stem cells to heal the spinal cord at the site of injury. They mature the stem cells into cells called oligodendrocyte precursor cells that are injected at the site of injury where it is hoped they can repair the insulating layer, called myelin, that normally protects the nerves in the spinal cord.

Heart Disease. The company Capricor is using donor cells derived from heart stem cells to treat patients developing heart failure after a heart attack. In early studies the cells appear to reduce scar tissue, promote blood vessel growth and improve heart function.

Solid Tumors. A team at the University of California, Los Angeles, has developed a drug that seeks out and destroys cancer stem cells, which are considered by many to be the reason cancers resist treatment and recur. It is believed that eliminating the cancer stem cells may lead to long-term cures.

Leukemia. A team at the University of California, San Diego, is using a protein called an antibody to target cancer stem cells. The antibody senses and attaches to a protein on the surface of cancer stem cells. That disables the protein, which slows the growth of the leukemia and makes it more vulnerable to other anti-cancer drugs.

Sickle Cell Anemia. A team at the University of California, Los Angeles, is genetically modifying a patient’s own blood stem cells so they will produce a correct version of hemoglobin, the oxygen carrying protein that is mutated in these patients, which causes an abnormal sickle-like shape to the red blood cells. These misshapen cells lead to dangerous blood clots and debilitating pain The genetically modified stem cells will be given back to the patient to create a new sickle cell-free blood supply.

Solid Tumors. A team at Stanford University is using a molecule known as an antibody to target cancer stem cells. This antibody can recognize a protein the cancer stem cells carry on their cell surface. The cancer cells use that protein to evade the component of our immune system that routinely destroys tumors. By disabling this protein the team hopes to empower the body’s own immune system to attack and destroy the cancer stem cells.

Diabetes. The company Viacyte is growing cells in a permeable pouch that when implanted under the skin can sense blood sugar and produce the levels of insulin needed to eliminate the symptoms of diabetes. They start with embryonic stem cells, mature them part way to becoming pancreas tissues and insert them into the permeable pouch. When transplanted in the patient, the cells fully develop into the cells needed for proper metabolism of sugar and restore it to a healthy level.

HIV/AIDS. A team at The City of Hope is genetically modifying patients’ own blood-forming stem cells so that they can produce immune cells—the ones normally destroyed by the virus—that cannot be infected by the virus. It is hoped this will allow the patients to clear their systems of the virus, effectively curing the disease

Blindness. A team at the University of Southern California is using cells derived from embryonic stem cell and a scaffold to replace cells damaged in Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. The therapy starts with embryonic stem cells that have been matured into a type of cell lost in AMD and places them on a single layer synthetic scaffold. This sheet of cells is inserted surgically into the back of the eye to replace the damaged cells that are needed to maintain healthy photoreceptors in the retina.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: gene editing tools, lung repair in COPD and big brains

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Correcting the genetic error in sickle-cell disease might be as simple as editing the text.

Correcting the genetic error in sickle-cell disease might be as simple as editing the text [Credit: Nature News].

Review of the many ways to edit defective genes. Nature’s news section did a nice review of the many ways blood-forming stem cells can be genetically altered to correct diseases caused by a single mutation. If you have been following the recently booming field of gene therapy, you may have a hard time keeping all the items in the gene editing toolbox straight. The Nature author provides a rundown on the leading contenders—viral vectors, zinc fingers, TALENs and CRISPRs. Early in the piece she describes why researchers are so excited by the field.

“Although most existing treatments for genetic diseases typically only target symptoms, genetic manipulation or ‘gene therapy’ goes after the cause itself.”

Much of the article talks about work by CIRM grantees. It describes work by Don Kohn at the University of California, Los Angeles, on vectors and zinc fingers, as well as work by Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte at the Salk Institute using TALENS and CRISPRs. We explain Kohn’s work treating sickle cell disease in our Fact Sheet.

Getting lungs to repair themselves. A research team at Jackson Labs in Maine has isolated a stem cell in lungs that appears to be able to repair damage left behind by severe infections. They hope to learn enough about how those stem cells work to enlist them to repair damage in diseases like Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

They published the work in Nature and ScienceDaily picked up the lab’s press release. It quotes the lead researcher, Wa Xian on the hope they see down the road for the 12 million people in the U.S. with COPD:

“These patients have few therapeutic options today. We hope that our research could lead to new ways to help them.”

Making middle-man cells more valuable. The University of Wisconsin lab of Jamie Thomson, where human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were first isolated, has found a way to make some of the offspring of those stem cells more valuable.

We have often written that for therapy, the desired cell to start with is not an ESC or even the end desired adult tissue, but rather a middleman cell called a progenitor. But those cells often don’t renew, or replicate themselves, very well in the lab. Ideally researchers would like to have a steady supply of progenitor cells that could be pushed to mature further only when needed. The Thomson lab found that by manipulating a few genes they could arrest the development of progenitors so they constantly renew themselves. ScienceNewsline picked up the press release from the University’s Morgridge Institute that houses the Thomson lab.

Link found to human’s big brains. A CIRM-funded team at the University of California, San Francisco, isolated a protein that seems to be responsible for fostering the large brain size in humans compared with other animals. Human brain stem cells need the protein, dubbed PDGFD, to reproduce.

The team found that the protein acts on parts of the brain that have changed during mammalian evolution. It is not active at all in mice brains, for example. So, if someone accuses you of being a smart aleck just tell them you can’t help it, it’s your PDGFD. HealthCanal ran the university’s press release, which provides a lot more detail of how the protein actually helps give us big heads.

Don Gibbons

CIRM Scientists Discover Key to Blood Cells’ Building Blocks

Our bodies generate new blood cells—both red and white blood cells—each and every day. But reproducing that feat in a petri dish has proven far more difficult.

Pictured: sections from zebrafish embryos. Blood vessels are labeled in red, the protein complex that regulates inflammation green and cell nuclei in blue. The arrowhead indicates a potential HSC. The image at bottom right combines all channels. [Credit: UC San Diego School of Medicine]

Pictured: sections from zebrafish embryos. Blood vessels are labeled in red, the protein complex that regulates inflammation green and cell nuclei in blue. The arrowhead indicates a potential HSC. The image at bottom right combines all channels.
[Credit: UC San Diego School of Medicine]

But now, scientists have identified the missing ingredient to producing hematopoietic stem cells, or HSC’s—the type of stem cell that gives rise to all blood and immune cells in the body. The results, published last week in the journal Cell, describe how a newly discovered protein plays a key role in generating HSC’s in the developing embryo—giving scientists a more complete recipe to reproduce these cells in the lab.

The research, which was led by University of California, San Diego (UCSD) professor David Traver and supported by a grant from CIRM, offers renewed hope for the possibility of generating patient-specific blood or immune cells using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS cell) technology.

As Traver explained in last week’s news release:

“The development of some mature cell lineages from iPS cells, such as cardiac or neural, has been reasonably straightforward, but not with HSCs. This is likely due, at least in part, to not fully understanding all the factors used by the embryo to generate HSCs.”

Indeed, the ability to generate HSCs has long challenged scientists, as outlined in a CIRM workshop from last year. But now, says Traver, they have found a crucial piece to the puzzle.

Specifically, the researchers investigated a signaling protein called tumor necrosis factor alpha—or TNFα for short— a protein known to be important for regulating inflammation and immunity. Previous research by this study’s first author, Raquel Espin-Palazon, and others also discovered it was related to the healthy function of blood vessels during embryonic development.

In this study, Traver, Espin-Palazon and the UCSD drilled down even further—and found that TNFα was required for the normal development of HSCs in the embryo. This surprised the research team, as the young embryo is generally considered to be sterile—with no need for a protein normally charged with regulating immune response to be switched on. Explained Traver:

“There was no expectation that pro-inflammatory signaling would be active at this time or in the blood-forming regions.”

While preliminary, establishing this relationship between TNFα and HSC formation will be a boon to researchers looking for new ways to generate large quantities of healthy, patient-specific red and white blood cells for those patients who so desperately need them.

Learn more about how stem cell technology could help treat blood diseases in our Thalassemia Fact Sheet.

What everybody needs to know about CIRM: where has the money gone

It’s been almost ten years since the voters of California created the Stem Cell Agency when they overwhelmingly approved Proposition 71, providing us $3 billion to help fund stem cell research.

In the last ten years we have made great progress – we will have ten projects that we are funding in or approved to begin clinical trials by the end of this year, a really quite remarkable achievement – but clearly we still have a long way to go. However, it’s appropriate as we approach our tenth anniversary to take a look at how we have spent the money, and how much we have left.

Of the $3 billion Prop 71 generates around $2.75 billion was set aside to be awarded to research, build laboratories etc. The rest was earmarked for things such as staff and administration to help oversee the funding and awards.

Of the research pool here’s how the numbers break down so far:

  • $1.9B awarded
  • $1.4B spent
  • $873M not awarded

So what’s the difference between awarded and spent? Well, unlike some funding agencies when we make an award we don’t hand the researcher all the cash at once and say “let us know what you find.” Instead we set a series of targets or milestones that they have to reach and they only get the next installment of the award as they meet each milestone. The idea is to fund research that is on track to meet its goals. If it stops meetings its goals, we stop funding it.

Right now our Board has awarded $1.9B to different institutions, companies and researchers but only $1.4B of that has gone out. And of the remainder we estimate that we will get around $100M back either from cost savings as the projects progress or from programs that are cancelled because they failed to meet their goals.

So we have approximately $1B for our Board to award to new research, which means at our current rate of spending we’ll have enough money to be able to continue funding new projects until around 2020. Because these are multi-year projects we will continue funding them till around 2023 when those projects end and, theoretically at least, we run out of money.

But we are already working hard to try and ensure that the well doesn’t run dry, and that we are able to develop other sources of funding so we can continue to support this work. Without us many of these projects are at risk of dying. Having worked so hard to get these projects to the point where they are ready to move out of the laboratory and into clinical trials in people we don’t want to see them fall by the wayside for lack of support.

Of the $1.9B we have awarded, that has gone to 668 awards spread out over five different categories:

CIRM spending Oct 2014

Increasingly our focus is on moving projects out of the lab and into people, and in those categories – called ‘translational’ and ‘clinical’ – we have awarded almost $630M in funding for more than 80 active programs.

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Under our new CIRM 2.0 plan we hope to speed up the number of projects moving into clinical trials. You can read more about how we plan on doing there in this blog.

It took Jonas Salk almost 15 years to develop a vaccine for polio but those years of hard work ended up saving millions of lives. We are working hard to try and achieve similar results on dozens of different fronts, with dozens of different diseases. That’s why, in the words of our President & CEO Randy Mills, we come to work every day as if lives depend on us, because lives depend on us.

Stem Cell Stories that Caught our Eye: Perspective on “Walking” Patient, Blood Stem Cells have a Helper and Three Clinical Trials at One Campus

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Some perspective on nasal stem cells and ”walking” patient. PZ Meyers writing on ScienceBlogs did a good job of putting some perspective into the hype in many news outlets about the spinal cord injury patient who was treated with nasal stem cells. He starts out admitting he was “incredulous” that there was anything to the study, but after a thorough reading of the actual journal article he was convinced that there was some real, though modest gain in function for the patient. His conclusion:

“Sad to say, the improvements in the man’s motor and sensory ability are more limited and more realistic than most of the accounts would have you think.”

The research team actually reported on three patients. One got barely noticeable improvement; the patient in the news reports regained about 25 percent of function—which is indisputably a major gain in this population—and the third was somewhere in between.

shutterstock_132771389

Meyer speculated about a reason for the improvements that was left out of most press reports. In addition to the stem cell harvested from the patients’ own nasal passages injected on either side of the injury the team also harvested nerve fibers from the patients legs and transplanted them across the site of the injury. They hoped the nerve strands would act as a bridge for the stem cells to grow and close the gap. It is also possible that being nerve cells they could provide the right cell-to-cell signals directing the nasal stem cells to become nerves. Meyers closed with an appropriate summary:

“I think there’s good reason to be optimistic and see some hope for an effective treatment for serious spinal cord injuries, but right now it has to be a realistic hope — progress has been made. A cure does not exist.”

Body’s own helper for blood stem cells found. In a case of the children ordering around the parents, a team at the Stowers Institute in Kansas City found that one of the progeny of blood-forming stem cells in the bone marrow can control the activity of the stem cells. In particular, they were looking at megacarocytes, the relatively rare bone marrow cells that normally produce the blood platelets you need for clotting a wound.

Blood stem cells are the most common stem cell therapy today, but one plagued by our limited ability to control their growth. Knowing this involvement of their offspring gives researcher a new avenue to search for ways to grow the much needed parent stem cells. Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News wrote up the findings.

(Yes, I may be the only person in World Series-obsessed San Francisco writing something positive about Kansas City this week.)

Three clinical trails launched at just one campus. We have written individually about three clinical trials that began in the last month at the University of California, San Diego. Now, the university has written a good wrap up of the three trials that got posted to ScienceDaily.

Collectively, the three trials show the breadth of stem cell research starting to reach patients. One trial, for diabetes, uses cells derived from embryonic stem cells encased in a pouch to protect them from immune rejection. Another uses cells derived from fetal nerve stem cells to treat spinal cord injury. And the third involves a drug that targets the cancer stem cells that are believed to cause much of the spread of the disease and resistance to chemotherapy in cancer patients.

CIRM is funding two of the three trials and supported much of the basic science that led to the third. We expect to be funding 10 projects with approved clinical trials by the end of the year. The field is moving.

Don Gibbons

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: Some good news got a little overplayed on blindness and Alzheimer’s

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Stories on blindness show too much wide-eyed wonder. While our field got some very good news this week when Advanced Cell Technologies (ACT) published data on its first 18 patients treated for two blinding diseases, many of the news stories were a little too positive. The San Diego Union Tribune ran the story from Associated Press writer Maria Cheng who produced an appropriately measured piece. She led with the main point of this early-phase study—the cells implanted seem to be safe—and discussed “improved vision” in half the patients. She did not imply their sight came back to normal. Her third paragraph had a quote from a leading voice in the field Chris Mason of University College London:

“It’s a wonderful first step but it doesn’t prove that (stem cells) work.”

The ACT team implanted a type of cell called RPE cells made from embryonic stem cells. Those cells are damaged in the two forms of blindness tested in this trial, Stargardt’s macular dystrophy and age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Some of the patients have been followed for three years after the cell transplants, which provides the best evidence to date that cells derived from embryonic stem cells can be safe. And some of the patients regained useful levels of vision, which with this small study you still have to consider other possible reasons for the improvement, but it is certainly a positive sign.

CIRM funds a team using a different approach to replacing the RPE cells in these patients and they expect to begin a clinical trial late this year

Stem cells create stronger bone with nanoparticles.   Getting a person’s own stem cells to repair bad breaks in their bones certainly seems more humane than hacking out a piece of healthy bone from some place else on their body and moving it to the damaged area. But our own stem cells often can’t mend anything more than minor breaks. So, a team from Keele University and the University of Nottingham in the U.K. laced magnetic nanoparticles with growth factors that stimulate stem cell growth and used external magnets to hold the particles at the site of injury after they were injected.

It worked nicely in laboratory models as reported in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine, and reported on the web site benzinga. Now comes the hard step of proving it is safe to test in humans

Stem cells might end chronic shortage of blood platelets. Blood platelets—a staple of cancer therapy because they get depleted by chemotherapy and radiation—too often are in short supply. They can only set on the shelf for five days after a donation. If we could generate them from stem cells, they could be made on demand, but you’d have to make many different versions to match various peoples’ blood type. The latter has been a bit of a moot point since no one has been able to make clinical grade platelets from stem cells.

plateletsA paper published today by Advanced Cell Technologies may have solved the platelet production hurdle and the immune matching all at once. (ACT is having a good week.) They produced platelets in large quantities from reprogrammed iPS type stem cells without using any of the ingredients that make many iPS cells unusable for human therapy. And before they made the platelets, they deleted the gene in the stem cells responsible for the bulk of immune rejection. So, they may have created a so-called “universal” donor.

They published their method in Stem Cell Reports and Reuters picked up their press release. Let’s see if the claims hold up.

Alzheimer’s in a dish—for the second time. My old colleagues at Harvard got a little more credit than they deserved this week. Numerous outlets, including the Boston Globe, picked up a piece by The New York Times’ Gina Kolata crediting them with creating a model of Alzheimer’s in a lab dish for the first time. This was actually done by CIRM-grantee Lawrence Goldstein at the University of California, San Diego, a couple years ago.

But there were some significant differences in what the teams did do. Goldstein’s lab created iPS type stem cells from skin samples of patients who had a genetic form of the disease. They matured those into nerve cells and did see increased secretion of the two proteins, tau and amyloid-beta, found in the nerves of Alzheimer’s patients. But they did not see those proteins turn into the plaques and tangles thought to wreak havoc in the disease. The Harvard team did, which they attributed, in part, to growing the cells in a 3-dimensional gel that let the nerves grow more like they would normally.

The Harvard team, however, started with embryonic stem cells, matured them into nerves, and then artificially introduced the Alzheimer’s-associated gene. They have already begun using the model system to screen existing drugs for candidates that might be able to clear or prevent the plaques and tangles. But they introduced the gene in such a way the nerve cells over express the disease gene, so it is not certain the model will accurately predict successful therapies in patients.

Don Gibbons

These Are the Cells You’re Looking for: Scientists Devise New Way to Extract Bone-Making Stem Cells from Fat

Buried within our fat tissue are stashes of stem cells—a hidden reservoir of cells that, if given the right cues, can transform into cells that make up bone, cartilage or fat. These cells therefore represent a much-needed store for regenerative therapies that rebuild bone or cartilage lost to disease or injury.

Finding cells that have bone-making potential is more efficiently done by looking at the genes they express (in this case, ALPL) than at proteins on their surface. The bone matrix being produced by cells is stained red in samples of cells that do not express ALPL (left), those that do express ALPL (right). [Credit: Darling lab/Brown University]

Finding cells that have bone-making potential is more efficiently done by looking at the genes they express (in this case, ALPL) than at proteins on their surface. The bone matrix being produced by cells is stained red in samples of cells that do not express ALPL (left), those that do express ALPL (right). The center image shows both types of cells prior to sorting [Credit: Darling lab/Brown University]

The only problem with these tucked-away cellular reservoirs, however, is identifying them and getting them out.

But now, researchers at Brown University have devised a unique method of identifying, extracting and then cultivating these bone-producing stem cells. Their results, published today in the journal Stem Cell Research & Therapy, seem to offer a much-needed alternative resource for growing bone.

Traditional methods attempting to locate and extract these stem cells focused on proteins that reside on the surface of the cells. Find the proteins, scientists reasoned, and you’ve found the cell.

Unfortunately, that method was not fool proof, and many argued that it wasn’t finding all the cells that reside in the fat tissue. So Brown scientists, led by Dr. Eric Darling found an alternative.

They knew that a gene called ALPL is an indicator of bone-making cells. If the gene is switched on, the cell has the potential to make bone. If it’s switched off, it does not. So Darling and his team devised a fluorescent marker, or tag, that stuck to the cells with activated ALPL. They then used a special machine to sort the cells: those that glowed went into one bucket, those that did not went into the other.

To prove that these ALPL-activated cells were indeed capable of becoming bone and cartilage, they then cultivated them for several weeks in a petri dish. Not only did they transform into the right cell types—they did so in greater numbers than cells extracted using traditional methods.

Hetal Marble, a graduate student in Darling’s lab and the paper’s first author, argues that tagging genes—rather than surface proteins—in order to distinguish and weed out cell types represents an important paradigm shift in the field. As he stated in a press release:

“Approaches like this allow us to isolate all the cells that are capable of doing what we want, whether they fit the archetype of what a stem cell is or is not. The paradigm shift is thinking about isolating populations that are able to achieve an end point rather than isolating populations that fit a strictly defined archetype.”

While their method is both precise and accurate, there is one drawback: it is slow.

Currently, it takes four days to tag, extract and cultivate the bone-making cells. In the future, the team hopes they can shorten this time frame so that they could perform the required steps within a single surgical session. As Darling stated:

“If you can take a patient into the OR, isolate a bunch of their cells, sort them and put them back in—that’s ideally where we’d like to go with this.”

Stories of Hope: Sickle Cell Disease

This week on The Stem Cellar we feature some of our most inspiring patients and patient advocates as they share, in their own words, their Stories of Hope.

Adrienne Shapiro pledged she would give her daughter Marissa the best possible life she could have—wearing herself out if necessary. Her baby girl had sickle cell disease, an inherited disorder in which the body’s oxygen-carrying red blood cells become crescent shaped, sticky, rigid, and prone to clumping—blocking blood flow. Doctors warned Adrienne that Marissa might not live to see her first birthday. When Marissa achieved that milestone, they moved the grim prognosis back a year, and then another year, and then another.

Adrienne has seen first hand how difficult it is to live with this blood disease.

Adrienne has lived through several generations of the inherited blood disease.

Adrienne worked tirelessly to help Marissa. “I was constantly asking questions,” Shapiro says. And for a long time, it worked.

However, things began to unravel for Marissa as she reached adulthood. A standard treatment for sickle cell disease—and the excruciating pain caused by blocked blood vessels—is regular blood transfusions. A transfusion floods the body with healthy, round red blood cells, lowering the proportion of the deformed, ‘sickle-shaped’ cells. But when she was 20, a poorly matched blood transfusion triggered a cascade of immune problems. Later, surgery to remove her gall bladder set off a string of complications and her kidneys shut down temporarily. After that, her immune system couldn’t take any more insults. Now, at age 36, she’s hypersensitive.

“She can’t be transfused. She can’t even have tape next to her skin without her body reacting,” Adrienne said.

Pain control is the newest and continuing nightmare. Adrienne tells harrowing stories of long waits in hospital emergency rooms while her daughter suffers, followed by maddening arguments with staff reluctant to provide enough drugs to control the intense pain when her daughter is finally admitted.

“When she was a kid, everyone wanted to make her feel good,” Adrienne says. “But when we moved from the pediatric side to the adult side, they treated her as a drug seeker and me as an enabler. It’s such a slap in the face.”

For Adrienne, the story is all too familiar. She is the third generation in her family with a sickle cell child. Another daughter, Casey Gibson, does not have the disease but carries the sickle cell mutation, meaning she could pass it to a child if the father also has the trait. One in 500 African Americans has sickle cell disease, as do 1 in 36,000 Hispanic people.

There is only one sure way to stop this story from repeating for generations to come, Adrienne says, and that’s research. She believes stem cell science will be the answer.

“I’ve been waiting for this science to get to the point where it had a bona fide cure, something that worked. Now we’re actually nearing clinical trials. It’s so close.”

In fact a CIRM-funded project led by Don Kohn, M.D. at UCLA aims to start trials in 2014. Kohn and his team intend to remove bone marrow from the patient and fix the genetic defect in the blood-forming stem cells. Then those cells can be reintroduced into the patient to create a new, healthy blood system.

“Stem cells are our only hope,” Adrienne continues, “It’s my true belief that I’m going to be the last woman in my family to have a child with sickle cell disease. Marissa’s going to be the last child to suffer, and Casey is going to be the last one to fear. Stem cells are going to fix this for us and many other families.”

For more information about CIRM-funded sickle cell disease research, visit our Sickle Cell Disease Fact Sheet. You can read more about Adrienne’s Story of Hope on our website.

CIRM-Funded Scientists Test Recipe for Building New Muscles

When muscles get damaged due to disease or injury, the body activates its reserves—muscle stem cells that head to the injury site and mature into fully functioning muscle cells. But when the reserves are all used up, things get tricky.

Scientists at Sanford-Burnham may have uncovered the key to muscle repair.

Scientists at Sanford-Burnham may have uncovered the key to muscle repair.

This is especially the case for people living with muscle diseases, such as muscular dystrophy, in which the muscle degrades at a far faster rate than average and the body’s reserve stem cell supply becomes exhausted. With no more supply from which to draw new muscle cells, the muscles degrade further, resulting in the disease’s debilitating symptoms, such as progressive difficulty walking, running or speaking.

So, scientists have long tried to find a way to replenish the dwindling supply of muscle stem cells (called ‘satellite cells’), thus slowing—or even halting—muscle decay.

And now, researchers at the Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute have found a way to tweak the normal cycle, and boost the production of muscle cells even when supplies appear to be diminished. These findings, reported in the latest issue of Nature Medicine, offer an alternative treatment for the millions of people suffering not only from muscular dystrophy, but also other diseases that result in muscle decay—such as some forms of cancer and age-related diseases.

In this study, Sanford-Burnham researchers found that introducing a particular protein, called a STAT3 inhibitor, into the cycle of muscle-cell regeneration could boost the production of muscle cells—even after multiple rounds of repair that would otherwise render regeneration virtually impossible.

The STAT3 inhibitor, as its name suggests, works by ‘inhibiting,’ or effectively neutralizing, another protein called STAT3. Normally, STAT3 gets switched on in response to muscle injury, setting in motion a series of steps that replenishes muscle cells.

In experiments first in animal models of muscular dystrophy—and next in human cells in a petri dish—the team decided to modify how STAT3 functions. Instead of keeping STAT3 active, as would normally occur, the team introduced the STAT3 inhibitor at specific times during the muscle regeneration process. And in so doing, noticed a significant boost in muscle cell production. As Dr. Alessandra Sacco, the study’s senior author, stated in a news release:

“We’ve discovered that by timing the inhibition of STAT3—like an ‘on/off’ light switch—we can transiently expand the satellite cell population followed by their differentiation into mature cells.”

This approach to spurring muscle regeneration, which was funded in part by a CIRM training grant, is not only innovative, but offers new hope to a disease for which treatments have offered little. As Dr. Vittorio Sartorelli, deputy scientific director of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), stated:

“Currently, there is no cure to stop or reverse any form of muscle-wasting disorders—only medication and therapy that can slow the process. A treatment approach consisting of cyclic bursts of STAT3 inhibitors could potentially restore muscle mass and function in patients, and this would be a very significant breakthrough.”

Sacco and her colleagues are encouraged by these results, and plan to explore their findings in greater detail—hopefully moving towards clinical trials:

“Our next step is to see how long we can extend the cycling pattern, and test some of the STAT3 inhibitors currently in clinical trials for other indications such as cancer, as this could accelerate testing in humans.”

Stem Cell Stories that Caught our Eye: What’s the Best Way to Treat Deadly Cancer, Destroying Red Blood Cells’ Barricade, Profile of CIRM Scientist Denis Evseenko

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Stem Cells vs. Drugs for Treating Deadly Cancer. When dealing with a potentially deadly form of cancer, choosing the right treatment is critical. But what if that treatment also poses risks, especially for older patients? Could advances in drug development render risky treatments, such as transplants, obsolete?

That was the focus of a pair of studies published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine, where a joint Israeli-Italian research team investigated the comparative benefits of two different treatments for a form of cancer called multiple myeloma.

Multiple myeloma attacks the body’s white blood cells. While rare, it is one of the most deadly forms of cancer—more than half of those diagnosed with the disease do not survive five years after being diagnosed. The standard form of treatment is usually a stem cell transplant, but with newer and better drugs coming on the market, could they render transplants unnecessary?

In the twin studies, the research team divided multiple myeloma patients into two groups. One received a combination of stem cell transplant and chemotherapy, while the other received a combination of drugs including melphalan, prednisone and lenalidmomide. After tracking these patients over a period of four years, the research team saw a clear advantage for those patients that had received the transplant-chemotherapy treatment combination.

To read more about these twin studies check out recent coverage in NewsMaxHealth.

Breaking Blood Cells’ Barricade. The process whereby stem cells mature into red blood cells is, unfortunately, not as fast as scientists would like. In fact, there is a naturally occurring barrier that keeps the production relatively slow. In a healthy person this is not necessarily a problem, but for someone in desperate need of red blood cells—it can prove to be very dangerous.

Luckily, scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found a way to break through this barrier by switching off two key proteins. Once firmly in the ‘off’ position, the team could boost the production of red blood cells.

These findings, published in the journal Blood, are critical in the context of disease anemia, where the patient’s red blood cell count is low. They also may lead to easier methods of stocking blood banks.

Read more about this exciting discovery at HealthCanal.

CIRM Scientist on the Front Lines of Cancer. Finally, HealthCanal has an enlightening profile of Dr. Denis Evseenko, a stem cell scientist and CIRM grantee from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

Born in Russia, the profile highlights Evseenko’s passion for studying embryonic stem cells—and their potential for curing currently incurable diseases. As he explains in the article:

“I had a noble vision to develop progressive therapies for the patient. It was a very practical vision too, because I realized how limited therapeutic opportunities could be for the basic scientist, and I had seen many great potential discoveries die out before they ever reached the clinic. Could I help to create the bridge between stem cells, research and actual therapeutics?”

Upon arriving at UCLA, Evseenko knew he wanted to focus this passion into the study of degenerative diseases and diseases related to aging, such as cancer. His bold vision of bridging the gap between basic and translational research has earned him support not only from CIRM, but also the National Institutes of Health and the US Department of Defense, among others. Says Evseenko:

“It’s my hope that we can translate the research we do and discoveries we make here to the clinic to directly impact patient care.”