CIRM fights cancer: $56 million for 5 clinical trials to vanquish tumors for good

target on CSC[This is the first of three stories on CIRM’s Cancer Fight that we will post this week. Tomorrow’s will discuss two projects that attack cancer stem cells directly and Thursday’s will describe three projects that help our immune system wipe out the traitorous cells.]

It’s back—two words we would like to remove from the cancer caregivers’ vocabulary. Many researchers blame cancer stem cells for this too common occurrence, saying cancer stem cells have ways of avoiding most traditional therapies and trigger the tumor’s return. Others prefer the term “tumor initiating cells.” But whatever you call them they need to be dealt with if we are going to make major improvements in cancer patient survival.

Cancer_stem_cellsCIRM is investing $56 million in five clinical trials targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs), the most advanced projects in our over $200 million commitment so far, to fighting cancer. Two of these trials use agents that target the cancer stem cells directly and three use agents that enable a person’s immune system to do a better job of getting rid of the CSCs.

Trials that target cancer stem cells directly

 One of the clinical trials directly targeting CSCs uses a type of protein called an antibody to seek out the renegade stem cells and initiate their demise. Antibodies home to specific proteins on the surface of cells called antigens. Researchers have been able to identify a few antigens that seem to be almost exclusively on the surface of CSCs and they have become targets for therapy.

A team at the University of California, San Diego uses an antibody named after our agency Cirmtuzumab to fight chronic lymphocytic leukemia. It targets the protein ROR1 that is abundant on CSC in the leukemia but not on normal blood-forming stem cells. Once bound on the cells Cirmtuzumab seems to prevent them from proliferating and migrating to other parts of the body and promotes them to go through a form of cell death called apoptosis.

The second trial directly attacking CSCs, at the University of California, Los Angeles, targets various solid tumors. They use a drug that affects the CSCs ability to replicate. It binds to and inhibits a protein, called a kinase, that the CSCs use when they divide.

Trials that activate the immune system

 A third clinical trial, at Stanford, also uses an antibody, but in this case it blocks a protein the CSCs use to fend off the cells in our immune system that routinely destroy emergent cancers in all of us. Immuno-oncology, the process of juicing up our immune response to cancer, is one of the hottest areas in cancer research and on Wall Street right now. But most of those efforts target a part of the immune system called the T cell. The Stanford team mobilizes a different immune cell, the macrophage, which routinely gobbles up dying, damaged or cancerous cells.

One beautiful thing about all three of these therapies is they could reverse a decade-long trend of new cancer therapies being targeted to increasingly narrow populations of cancer patients, resulting in extremely high costs per patient. Because the proteins targeted by these therapies seem to be shared across a great many types of tumors, they could be broad-spectrum cancer strategies that could be delivered at a lower cost.

CIRM currently funds five clinical trials targeting cancer stem cells.

An additional five cancer clinical trials have been undertaken based on early research funded by CIRM.

The fourth CIRM-funded clinical trial also seeks to increase our natural immune response, in this case in notoriously hard to treat metastatic melanoma. Like the Stanford team, this project by researchers at the firm Caladrius Biosciences targets a type of cell different from most immuno-oncology. In this case they derive cells called dendritic cells from the patients’ blood and establish a cell line from their tumor. In the lab they mix the cell types together and the dendritic cells gobble up the tumor cells including the cancer’s antigens, those surface proteins that act as identification tags. When re-infused into the patient the dendritic cells do what they are really good at: presenting antigens to the immune cells responsible for getting rid of tumors. Dendritic cells display the antigens like road maps to the immune cells that can then seek out and kill the cancer stem cells.

The fifth CIRM-funded trial uses a similar concept activating a patient’s dendritic cells with antigens from their brain cancers, known as glioblastomas. That trial is being conducted by ImmunoCellular Therapeutics

The first three trials are all early phase studies looking to test safety and determine what is the best dose to use going forward. The last two trials are more advanced, so-called Phase 3 studies of a dose already having shown signs of benefit in earlier trials.

Calling for a cure for HIV/AIDS

Larry Kramer - Photo by David Shankbone

Larry Kramer – Photo by David Shankbone

Larry Kramer is a pivotal figure in the history of HIV/AIDS. His activism on many fronts has been widely credited with changing public health policy and speeding up access to experimental medications for people infected with the virus. So when he says that the fight for treatment is not enough but “The battle cry now must be one word — cure, cure, cure!” People pay attention.

A few years ago it might have been considered dangerously optimistic to use the word “cure” in any conversation about HIV/AIDS, but that’s no longer the case. In fact cure is something that is becoming not just a wildly ambitious dream, but something that scientists are working hard to achieve right now.

On Tuesday, October 6th, we are going to hold an HIV/AIDS Cure Town Hall meeting in Palm Springs. This will be the third event we’ve held and the previous two, in San Francisco and Los Angeles, were hugely successful. It’s not hard to understand why. Our experts are going to be talking about their work in trying to eradicate the AIDS virus from people infected with it.

This includes clinical trials run by Calimmune and City of Hope/Sangamo, plus some truly cutting edge research by Dr. Paula Cannon of the University of Southern California.

The clinical trials are both taking similar, if slightly different, approaches to reach the same goal; functionally curing people with HIV. They take the patient’s own blood stem cells and genetically modify them so that the AIDS virus is no longer able to infect them. They also help boost the patient’s T cells, a key part of a healthy immune system and the virus’ main target, so that they can fight back against the virus. It’s a kind of one-two punch to block and eventually evict the virus.

Timothy Brown; photo courtesy

Timothy Brown; photo courtesy

This work is based on the real-life experiences of Timothy Ray Brown, the “Berlin Patient”. He became the first person ever cured of HIV/AIDS when he got a bone marrow transplant from a person with a natural resistance to HIV. This created a new blood supply and a new immune system both of which were resistant to HIV.

Timothy is going to be joining us at the event in Palm Springs to share his story and show that cure is not just a word it’s a goal; one that we can now think of as being possible.

The HIV/AIDS Cure Town Hall event will be held on Tuesday, October 6th in the Sinatra Auditorium at the Desert Regional Medical Center in Palm Springs. Doors open at 6pm and the program starts at 6.30pm. And of course, it’s free.

Funding a clinical trial for deadly cancer is a no brainer

The beast of cancers
For a disease that is supposedly quite rare, glioblastoma seems to be awfully common. I have lost two friends to the deadly brain cancer in the last few years. Talking to colleagues and friends here at CIRM, it’s hard to find anyone who doesn’t know someone who has died of it.


Imagery of glioblastoma, a deadly brain cancer,  from ImmunoCellular’s website

So when we got an application to fund a Phase 3 clinical trial to target the cancer stem cells that help fuel glioblastoma, it was really a no brainer to say yes. Of course it helped that the scientific reviewers – our Grants Working Group or GWG – who looked at the application voted unanimously to approve it. For them, it was great science for an important cause.

Today our Board agreed with the GWG and voted to award $19.9 million to LA-based ImmunoCellular Therapeutics to carry out a clinical trial that targets glioblastoma cancer stem cells. They’re hoping to begin the trial very soon, recruiting around 400 newly diagnosed patients at some 120 clinical sites around the US, Canada and Europe.

There’s a real urgency to this work. More than 50 percent of those diagnosed with glioblastoma die within 15 months, and more than 90 percent within three years. There are no cures and no effective long-term treatments.

As our President and CEO, Dr. Randy Mills, said in a news release:

 “This kind of deadly disease is precisely why we created CIRM 2.0, our new approval process to accelerate the development of therapies for patients with unmet medical needs. People battling glioblastoma cannot afford to wait years for us to agree to fund a treatment when their survival can often be measured in just months. We wanted a process that was more responsive to the needs of patients, and that could help companies like ImmunoCellular get their potentially life-saving therapies into clinical trials as quickly as possible.”

The science
The proposed treatment involves some rather cool science. Glioblastoma stem cells can evade standard treatments like chemotherapy and cause the recurrence and growth of the tumors. The ImmunoCellular therapy addresses this issue and targets six cell surface proteins that are found on glioblastoma cancer stem cells.

The researchers take immune cells from the patient’s own immune system and expose them to fragments of these cancer stem cell surface proteins in the lab. By re-engineering the immune cells in this way they are then able to recognize the cancer stem cells.

My colleague Todd Dubnicoff likened it to letting a bloodhound sniff a piece of clothing from a burglar so it’s able to recognize the scent and hunt the burglar down.  When the newly trained immune system cells are returned to the patient’s body, they can now help “sniff out” and hopefully kill the cancer stem cells responsible for the tumor’s recurrence and growth.

Like a bloodhound picking up the scent of a burglar, ImmunoCellular's therapy helps the immune system track down brain cancer stem cells (source: wikimedia commons)

Like a bloodhound picking up the scent of a burglar, ImmunoCellular’s therapy helps the immune system track down brain cancer stem cells (source: Wikimedia Commons)

Results from both ImmunoCellular’s Phase 1 and 2 trials using this approach were encouraging, showing that patients given the therapy lived longer than those who got standard treatment and experienced only minimal side effects.

Turning the corner against glioblastoma
There’s a moment immediately after the Board votes “yes” to fund a project like this. It’s almost like a buzz, where you feel that you have just witnessed something momentous, a moment where you may have turned the corner against a deadly disease.

We have a saying at the stem cell agency: “Come to work every day as if lives depend on it, because lives depend on it.” On days like this, you feel that we’ve done something that could ultimately help save some of those lives.

Helping patient’s fight back against deadliest form of skin cancer

Caladrius Biosciences has been funded by CIRM to conduct a Phase 3 clinical trial to treat the most severe form of skin cancer: metastatic melanoma. Metastatic melanoma is a disease with no effective treatment, only around 15 percent of people with it survive five years, and every year it claims an estimated 10,000 lives in the U.S.

The CIRM/Caladrius Clinical Advisory Panel meets to chart future of clinical trial

The CIRM/Caladrius Clinical Advisory Panel meets to chart future of clinical trial

The Caladrius team has developed an innovative cancer treatment that is designed to target the cells responsible for tumor growth and spread. These are called cancer stem cells or tumor-initiating cells. Cancer stem cells can spread in the body because they have the ability to evade the body’s immune defense and survive standard anti-cancer treatments such as chemotherapy. The aim of the Caladrius treatment is to train the body’s immune system to recognize the cancer stem cells and attack them.

Attacking the cancer

The treatment process involves taking a sample of a patient’s own tumor and, in a laboratory, isolating specific cells responsible for tumor growth . Cells from the patient’s blood, called “peripheral blood monocytes,” are also collected. The mononucleocytes are responsible for helping the body’s immune system fight disease. The tumor and blood cells (after maturation into dendritic cells) are then combined and incubated so that the patient’s immune cells become trained to recognize the cancer cells.

After the incubation period, the patient’s immune cells are injected back into their body where they generate an immune response to the cancer cells. The treatment is like a vaccine because it trains the body’s immune system to recognize and rapidly attack the source of disease.

Recruiting the patients

Caladrius has already dosed the first patient in the trial (which is double blinded so no one knows if the patient got the therapy or a placebo) and hopes to recruit 250 patients altogether.

This is the first Phase 3 trial that CIRM has funded so we’re obviously excited about its potential to help people battling this deadly disease.  In a recent news release David J. Mazzo, the CEO of Caladrius echoed this excitement, with a sense of cautious optimism:

“The dosing of the first patient in this Phase 3 trial is an important milestone for our Company and the timing underscores our focus on this program and our commitment to impeccable trial execution. We are delighted by the enthusiasm and productivity of the team at Jefferson University (where the patient was dosed) and other trial sites around the country and look forward to translating that into optimized patient enrollment and a rapid completion of the Phase 3 trial.”

And that’s the key now. They have the science. They have the funding. Now they need the patients. That’s why we are all working together to help Caladrius recruit patients as quickly as possible. Because their work perfectly reflects our mission of accelerating the development of stem cell therapies for patients with unmet medical needs.

You can learn more about what the study involves and who is eligible by clicking here.

The Ogawa-Yamanaka Prize Crowns Its First Stem Cell Champion

A world of dark

Imagine if you woke up one day and couldn’t see. Your life would change drastically, and you would have to painfully relearn how to function in a world that heavily relies on sight.

A retina of a patient with macular degeneration. (Photo credit: Paul Parker/SPL)

A retina of a patient with macular degeneration. (Photo credit: Paul Parker/SPL)

While most people don’t lose their sight overnight, many suffer from visual impairments that slowly happen over time. Glaucoma, cataracts, and macular degeneration are examples of debilitating eye diseases that eventually lead to blindness.

With almost 300 million people world wide with some form of visual impairment, there’s urgency in the scientific community to develop safe therapies for clinical applications. One of the most promising strategies is using human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived from patients to generate cell types suitable for transplantation into the human eye.

However, this task is more easily said than done. Safety, regulatory, and economical concerns make the process of translating iPS cell therapies from the bench into the clinic an enormous challenge worthy only of a true scientific champion.

A world of light

Dr. Masayo Takahashi

Dr. Masayo Takahashi

Meet Dr. Masayo Takahashi. She is a faculty member at the RIKEN Centre for Developmental Biology, a prominent female scientist in Japan, and a bona fide stem cell champion. Her mission is to cure diseases of blindness using iPS cell technology.

Since the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of iPS cells by Dr. Shinya Yamanaka eight years ago, Dr. Takahashi has made fast work using this technology to generate specific cells from human iPS cells that can be transplanted into patients to treat an eye disease called macular degeneration. This disease results in the degeneration of the retina, an area in the back of the eye that receives light and translates the information to your brain to produce sight.

Dr. Takahashi generates cells called retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from human iPS cells that can replace lost or dying retinal cells when transplanted into patients with macular degeneration. What makes this therapy so exciting is that Dr. Takahashi’s iPS-derived RPE cells appear to be relatively safe and don’t cause an immune system reaction or cause tumors when transplanted into humans.

Because of the safety of her technology, and the unfulfilled needs of millions of patients with eye diseases, Dr. Takahashi made it her goal to take iPS cells into humans within five years of Dr. Yamanaka’s discovery.

Ogawa-Yamanaka Stem Cell Prize

It’s no surprise that Dr. Takahashi succeeded in her ambitious goal. Her cutting edge work has led to the first clinical trial using iPS cells in humans, specifically treating patients with macular degeneration. In September 2014, the first patient, a 70-year-old Japanese woman, received a transplant of her own iPS-derived RPE cells and no complications were reported.

Currently, the trial is on hold “as part of a safety validation step and in consideration of anticipated regulatory changes to iPS cell research in Japan” according to a Gladstone Institute news release. Nevertheless, this first iPS cell trial in humans has overcome significant regulatory hurdles, has set an important precedent for establishing the safety of stem cell therapies, and has given scientists hope that iPS cell therapies can become a reality.

Dr. Deepak Srivastava presents Dr. Takahashi with the Ogawa-Yamanaka Prize.

Dr. Deepak Srivastava presents Dr. Takahashi with the Ogawa-Yamanaka Prize.

For her accomplishments, Dr. Takahashi was recently awarded the first ever Ogawa-Yamanaka Stem Cell Prize and honored at a special event held at the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco yesterday. This prize was established by a generous gift from Mr. Hiro Ogawa in collaboration with Dr. Shinya Yamanaka and Dr. Deepak Srivastava at the Gladstone Institutes. The award recognizes scientists who conduct translational iPS cell research that will eventually be applied to patients in the clinic.

In an interview with CIRM, Dr. Deepak Srivastava, the Director of the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease and the Roddenberry Center for Stem Cell Biology and Medicine at Gladstone, described the prestigious prize and the ceremony held at the Gladstone to honor Dr. Takahashi:

Dr. Deepak Srivastava

The Ogawa-Yamanaka prize prize is meant to incentivize and honor those whose work is advancing the translational use of stem cells for regenerative medicine. Dr. Masayo Takahashi is a pioneer in pushing the technology of iPS cell-derived cell types and actually introducing them into people. She’s the very first person in the world to successfully overcome all the regulatory barriers and the scientific barriers to introduce this new type of stem cell into a patient. And she’s done so for a condition of blindness called macular degeneration, which affects millions of people world wide, and for which there are very few treatments currently. We are honoring her with this prize for her pioneering efforts at making this technology one that can be applied to patients.

The new world that iPS cells will bring

As part of the ceremony, Dr. Takahashi gave a scientific talk on the new world that iPS cells will bring for patients with diseases that lack cures, including those with visual impairments. The Stem Cellar team was lucky enough to interview Dr. Takahashi as well as attend her lecture during the Gladstone ceremony. We will cover both her talk and her interview with CIRM in an upcoming blog.

The Stem Cellar team at CIRM was excited to attend this momentous occasion, and to know that CIRM-funding has supported many researchers in the field of iPS cell therapy and regenerative medicine. We would like to congratulate Dr. Takahashi on her impressive and impactful accomplishments in this area and look forward to seeing progress in iPS cell trial for macular degeneration.


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The best scientists always want to know more

Sir Isaac Newton

Sir Isaac Newton

Some years ago I was in the Wren Library at Trinity College, Cambridge in England when I noticed a display case with a cloth over it. Being a naturally curious person, downright nosy in fact, I lifted the cloth. In the display case was a first edition of Sir Isaac Newton’s Principia Mathematica and in the margins were notes, corrections put there by Newton for the second edition.

It highlighted for me how the best scientists never stop working, never stop learning, never stop trying to improve what they do.

That came back to me when I saw a news release from ViaCyte, a company we are funding in a Phase 1 clinical trial to treat type 1 diabetes.  The news release announced results of a study showing that insulin-producing cells, created in the lab from embryonic stem cells, can not only mature but also function properly after being implanted in a capsule-like device and placed under the skin of an animal model.


Now the clinical trial we are funding with ViaCyte uses a similar, but slightly different set of cells in people. The device in the trial contains what ViaCyte calls PEC-01™ pancreatic progenitor cells. These are essentially an earlier stage of the mature pancreatic cells that our body uses to produce insulin. The hope is that when implanted in the body, the cells will mature and then behave like adult pancreatic cells, secreting insulin and other hormones to keep blood glucose levels stable and healthy.

Those cells and that device are being tested in people with type 1 diabetes right now.

Learning more

But in this study ViaCyte wanted to know if beta cells, a more mature version of the cells they are using in our trial, would also work or have any advantages over their current approach.

The good news, published in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine,  is that these cells did work. As they say in their news release:

“The animal study also demonstrated for the first time that when encapsulated in a device and implanted into mice, these more mature cells are capable of producing functional pancreatic beta cells. ViaCyte is also the first to show that these further differentiated cells can function in vivo following cryopreservation, a valuable process step when contemplating clinical and commercial application.”

This does not mean ViaCyte wants to change the cells it uses in the clinical trial. As President and CEO Paul Laikind, PhD, makes clear:

“For a number of reasons we believe that the pancreatic progenitor cells that are the active component of the VC01 product candidate are better suited for cell replacement therapy. However, the current work has expanded our fundamental knowledge of beta cell maturation and could lead to further advances for the field.”

And that’s what I mean about the best scientists are the ones who keeping searching, keeping looking for answers. It may not help them today, but who knows how important that work will prove in the future.

CIRM CAP Kickoff to New Clinical Trials

Alisha Bouge is the project manager for CIRM’s Clinical Advisory Panels (CAPs)

On the cusp of the official kickoff to football season, CIRM has had its own kickoff to celebrate.  The first Clinical Advisory Panel (CAP) meeting took place on August 18, 2015 in Irvine, CA with Caladrius Bioscience, Inc.  And just as every NFL team starts the season hopeful of a Super Bowl win, all our CAPs start out with equally lofty goals. That’s because under CIRM 2.0, the role of the CAP is to work with the clinical stage project teams we fund to help accelerate the development of therapies for patients with unmet medical needs and to give these projects the greatest likelihood of success.

In the case of Caladrius, the work is focused on treating metastatic melanoma, an aggressive and deadly form of skin cancer. You can read more about this clinical trial here.

Obstacles and challenges are inevitable in the lifecycle of research. CIRM hopes to help its grantees navigate through these hurdles as quickly and positively as possible by providing recommendations from expert advisors in the field.  The intention is for the CAP meeting process to be that navigating vessel throughout the lifetime of each clinical stage project.

The CAPs will include at least three members: one CIRM science officer, a patient representative, and an external scientific advisor.  The CAP will meet with the project team approximately four times a year, with the first meeting taking place in-person.  Consider the CAP as the grantee’s special team, doing all they can to get that two-point conversion at the end of an already successful outcome, giving the grantee and their team just a few more points in their pocket to reach the ultimate success.


CIRM CAP on a tour of Caladrius’ facility in Irvine, CA.  The CIRM CAP can be seen in the far right of the photo (left to right) Randy Lomax (Patient Representative), Ingrid Caras (CIRM Sr. Science Officer), and Hassan Movahhed (External Scientific Advisor).

As the lead Science Officer on this first CAP, CIRM’s Ingrid Caras stated: “This is our opportunity to be good stewards of the taxpayers’ money.”

The mission and the message of the CAP was well received by Caladrius.  After the CAP meeting, Anna Crivici, VP of Operations & Program Management at Caladrius, had this to say about her experience:

anna crivici

Anna Crivici, Caladrius

I thought that the meeting was very productive.  Everyone on the Caladrius team appreciates the collaborative approach CIRM is taking on the program, as amply demonstrated during our successful first meeting.  The discussion on every agenda topic was helpful and insightful.  The opportunity to better understand the patient perspective will be especially beneficial and increasingly important as the Phase 3 program progresses.  We are confident that this and future CAP meetings will help us advance and refine our strategic planning and execution.


CIRM CAP and members of Caladrius discussing operational strategies for success.

CIRM is looking forward to the 2015/2016 CAP season. And while there is no Super Bowl incentive at the end of our season, there is the hope that CIRM’s efforts, both financially and collaboratively, will contribute to successful treatments for so many out there in need. That’s something well worth cheering for.