Avoiding drug trial tragedies: new stem cell-based test predicts dangerous drug toxicity

In 2006 Ryan Wilson, a healthy 20 year old Londoner, volunteered for a first-in-human clinical trial to help test the safety of a new drug, TGN1412, intended to treat rheumatoid arthritis and leukemia. The cash he’d get in exchange for his time would help fund his upcoming vacation.

Instead, he nearly died.

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The TGN1412 drug trial disaster got a lot of high profile news coverage in 2006. (image credit: BBC News)

Even though the drug amount injected in his body was 500 times lower than the dose found to be safe in animals, Wilson experienced a catastrophic immune reaction, called a cytokine storm, that led to heart, kidney and liver failure, pneumonia and the loss of his toes and three fingers to dry gangrene. The other five healthy volunteers were also severely injured.

TGN1412’s devastating effect was unfortunately missed in preclinical laboratory and animal studies prior to the human trial. Unlike the pills in your medicine cabinet which are made up of synthesized chemicals, TGN1424 belongs to a growing class of medicines called biologics which come from biological sources such as proteins, DNA, sugars and cells. There is a concern that once a biologic is injected in a patient, the immune system may mount a strong attack all over the body. If that happens, too many immune cells, or white blood cells, are activated and release proteins, called cytokines, which in turn activate more immune cells and the reaction spirals into a dangerous cytokine storm like in Ryan Wilson’s case.

Clearly this tragedy begs for tests that can better predict drug toxicity in humans well before the first trial participants step into the clinic. On Monday a research team from the Imperial College London reported in the journal FASEB that they have done just that using human blood stem cells.

The team’s novel test is not so different than previous ones. Both tests are carried out in a petri dish using two human cell types: white blood cells and endothelial cells, a component of blood vessels. Both tests are also designed to mimic the human immune system’s response to biologics by measuring the release of cytokines.

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Endothelial cells grown from blood stem cells. (credit: Imperial College London)

But the Imperial College London team’s test differs from others in one important way: both the white blood cell and endothelial cell types come from the same individual. First they collect a donor’s blood stem cells and specialize them into endothelial cells. Then white blood cells are also collected from the same donor.

The prior tests, on the other hand, rely on cells from two different donors. Because the two cell types aren’t necessarily tissue-matched, the white blood cells may already be primed for an immune response even before a biologic is added to the test. In fact, these prior tests weren’t able to distinguish between a biologic known to cause a limited immune response versus TGN1424, known to cause a cytokine storm. The newly developed test, however, accurately predicts both the toxic cytokine storm caused by TGN1424 and the absence of a response by several approved biologics, such as the breast cancer drug Herceptin.

In a college news release, Jane Mitchell, the senior author on the report, sees the big picture importance of her lab’s work:

“As biological therapies become more mainstream, it’s more likely that drugs being tested on humans for the first time will have unexpected and potentially catastrophic effects. We’ve used adult stem cell technology to develop a laboratory test that could prevent another disaster like the TGN1412 trial.”

Their results also highlight the often-overlooked power of stem cells to not just deliver therapies but to help develop safer ones.

Pioneer’s 25-year struggle to treat blindness

Being a pioneer is never easy. You are charting unknown territory, tackling problems that have defeated others before you. You have to overcome so many obstacles that at times the challenge can seem insurmountable. But for those who succeed in reaching their goal, the rewards can be extraordinary.

Graziella Pellegrini, Center for Regenerative Medicine, University of Modena, Italy

Graziella Pellegrini, Center for Regenerative Medicine, University of Modena, Italy

Last month Italian researcher Graziella Pellegrini saw 25 years of work pay off when a treatment she developed to cure a form of blindness was given approval for sale by the European Commission.

This is quite an achievement as this means her treatment, called Holoclar, is among the first commercial stem therapies in the world (the first was Prochymal, which has been approved in Canada and New Zealand for the treatment of pediatric GVHD. This drug was developed by Osiris, which was led by our current President & CEO, Dr. Randy Mills.)

Holoclar uses stem cells to help stimulate the regrowth of a cornea. It can only be used for certain rare conditions, but that in no way diminishes its importance for patients or significance for the regenerative medicine field as a whole.

Nature recently sat down with Dr. Pellegrini to talk about her work, her struggle, and the many obstacles she had to overcome to get market approval for her work.

The interview makes for fascinating reading, and is a timely reminder why this kind of groundbreaking research never goes quite as quickly, or smoothly, as one would hope.

CIRM currently has a number of projects focused treating different causes of blindness on limbal cells (the kind Dr. Pellegrini worked on) and other forms of blindness; including a project to treat macular degeneration that has been approved for a clinical trial, and a therapy for retinitis pigmentosa that we hope will be approved for a clinical trial later this year.

One-Time, Lasting Treatment for Sickle Cell Disease May be on Horizon, According to New CIRM-Funded Study

For the nearly 1,000 babies born each year in the United States with sickle cell disease, a painful and arduous road awaits them. The only cure is to find a bone marrow donor—an exceedingly rare proposition. Instead, the standard treatment for this inherited blood disorder is regular blood transfusions, with repeated hospitalizations to deal with complications of the disease. And even then, life expectancy is less than 40 years old.

In Sickle Cell Disease, the misshapen red blood cells cause painful blood clots and a host of other complications.

In Sickle Cell Disease, the misshapen red blood cells cause painful blood clots and a host of other complications.

But now, scientists at UCLA are offering up a potentially superior alternative: a new method of gene therapy that can correct the genetic mutation that causes sickle cell disease—and thus help the body on its way to generate normal, healthy blood cells for the rest of the patient’s life. The study, funded in part by CIRM and reported in the journal Blood, offers a great alternative to developing a functional cure for sickle cell disease. The UCLA team is about to begin a clinical trial with another gene therapy method, so they—and their patients—will now have two shots on goal in their effort to cure the disease.

Though sickle cell disease causes dangerous changes to a patient’s entire blood supply, it is caused by one single genetic mutation in the beta-globin gene—altering the shape of the red blood cells from round and soft to pointed and hard, thus resembling a ‘sickle’ shape for which the disease is named. But the UCLA team, led by Donald Kohn, has now developed two methods that can correct the harmful mutation. As he explained in a UCLA news release about the newest technique:

“[These results] suggest the future direction for treating genetic diseases will be by correcting the specific mutation in a patient’s genetic code. Since sickle cell disease was the first human genetic disease where we understood the fundamental gene defect, and since everyone with sickle cell has the exact same mutation in the beta-globin gene, it is a great target for this gene correction method.”

The latest gene correction technique used by the team uses special enzymes, called zinc-finger nucleases, to literally cut out and remove the harmful mutation, replacing it with a corrected version. Here, Kohn and his team collected bone marrow stem cells from individuals with sickle cell disease. These bone marrow stem cells would normally give rise to sickle-shaped red blood cells. But in this study, the team zapped them with the zinc-finger nucleases in order to correct the mutation.

Then, the researchers implanted these corrected cells into laboratory mice. Much to their amazement, the implanted cells began to replicate—into normal, healthy red blood cells.

Kohn and his team worked with Sangamo BioSciences, Inc. to design the zinc-finger nucleases that specifically targeted and cut the sickle-cell mutation. The next steps will involve improving the efficiency and safest of this method in pre-clinical animal models, before moving into clinical trials.

“This is a promising first step in showing that gene correction has the potential to help patients with sickle cell disease,” said UCLA graduate student Megan Hoban, the study’s first author. “The study data provide the foundational evidence that the method is viable.”

This isn’t the first disease for which Kohn’s team has made significant strides in gene therapy to cure blood disorders. Just last year, the team announced a promising clinical trial to cure Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Syndrome, also known as SCID or “Bubble Baby Disease,” by correcting the genetic mutation that causes it.

While this current study still requires more research before moving into clinical trials, Kohn and his team announced last month that their other gene therapy method, also funded by CIRM, has been approved to start clinical trials. Kohn argues that it’s vital to explore all promising treatment options for this devastating condition:

“Finding varied ways to conduct stem cell gene therapies is important because not every treatment will work for every patient. Both methods could end up being viable approaches to providing one-time, lasting treatments for sickle cell disease and could also be applied to the treatment of a large number of other genetic diseases.”

Find Out More:
Read first-hand about Sickle Cell Disease in our Stories of Hope series.
Watch Donald Kohn speak to CIRM’s governing Board about his research.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: Cancer genetics, cell fate, super donors and tale of road to diabetes cure

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

For cancer growth timing is everything. A study originating at the University of Southern California suggests tumors are born to be bad. Mutations constantly occur during the life of a tumor but those that occur early on determine if a tumor will grow as a benign mass of a cancerous one that spreads.

Describing the genetic markers the team found, the senior author, Christina Curtis, who recently moved to Stanford, was quoted in a story in ScienceBlog:

“What you see in the final cancer was there from the beginning.”

The CIRM funded team completed detailed genetic analysis of tumor cells surgically removed from colon cancer patients. Doctors treating these patients have long been hampered by an inability to tell which tumors will remain small and benign and which will develop into full-blown cancer. The researchers suggest the genetic fingerprints they have uncovered could lead to improved diagnosis for patients.

Physical forces also key to cell fate.
Putting the squeeze on stem cells may be what’s needed to get them to become bone. In this case, a team at the University of California, San Diego, used teeny tiny tweezers called “optical tweezers,” to trigger key internal signals that directed stem cells to go down the path to bone.

Pressure results in release of a cell signal shown in red

Pressure results in release of a cell signal shown in red

We have frequently written about the tremendous importance of a stem cell’s environment—its neighborhood if you will—in determining its fate. Yingxiao Wang, who led the study, described this role in a press release from the university picked up by ScienceNewsline:

“The mechanical environment around a stem cell helps govern a stem cell’s fate. Cells surrounded in stiff tissue such as the jaw, for example, have higher amounts of tension applied to them, and they can promote the production of harder tissues such as bone.”

He said the findings should help researchers trying to replicate the natural stem cell environment in the lab when they try to grow replacement tissues for patients.

Super donors could provide matching tissue.
One of the biggest challenges of using stem cells to replace damaged tissue is avoiding immune system rejection of the new cells. CIRM-grantee Cellular Dynamics International (CDI) announced this week that they have made key initial steps to creating a cell bank that could make this much easier.

Our bodies use molecules on the surface of our cells to identify tissue that is ours versus foreign such as bacteria. The huge variation in those molecules, called HLA, makes the matching needed for donor organ, or donor cells, more difficult than the New York Times Sunday crossword. But a few individuals posses an HLA combination that allows them to match to a large percent of the population.

CDI has now created clinical grade stem cell lines using iPS reprogramming of adult tissue from two such “super donors.” Just those two cell lines provide genetic matches for 19 percent of the population. The company plans to develop additional lines from other super donors with the goal of creating a bank that would cover 95 percent of the population.

Reuters picked up the company’s press release. CIRM does not fund this project, but we do fund another cell bank for which CDI is creating cells to better understand the causes of 11 diseases that have complex genetic origins

Narrative tells the tale of developing diabetes therapy. MIT Technology Review has published a well-told feature about the long road to creating a stem cell-based therapy for diabetes. Author Bran Alexander starts with the early days of the “stem cell wars” and carries the tale through treatment of the first patients in the CIRM-funded clinical trial being carried out by ViaCyte and the University of California, San Diego.

The piece quotes Viacyte’s chief scientific officer Kevin D’Amour about the long road:

“When I first came to ViaCyte 12 years ago, cell replacement through stem cells was so obvious. We all said, ‘Oh, that’s the low-hanging fruit.’ But it turned out to be a coconut, not an apple.”

But the article shows that with Viacyte’s product as well as others coming down the pike, that coconut has been cracked and real hope for diabetics lies inside.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: repairing radiation damage, beta thalassemia clinical trial and disease models

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Stem cells repair brain damage from radiation therapy. Radiation for brain cancer can be a lifesaver but it can also be a dramatic life changer. If often leaves patients with considerably reduced brain function. Now a team at New York’s Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center has found a way to instruct human stem cells to repair some of that damage—at least in rats.

The damage seems to be to the middle-man or so-called progenitor cells that maintain the myelin cells that insulate the nerves in the brain. When that myelin is damaged by the radiation those progenitor cells are no longer able to make repairs and that results in reduced nerve function. Rats given the stem cells regained both cognitive and motor skills lost after brain radiation.

The team leader, Viviane Taber, noted this work could make radiation therapy even more of a lifesaver. ScienceDaily quoted Tabar from materials provided by Cell Press that published the work:

“This will have to be proven further, but if we can repair the brain effectively, we could be bolder with our radiation dosing, within limits.”

This could be especially important in children, for whom physicians deliberately deliver lower radiation doses.


Stem cell trial for Beta-Thalassemia cleared to begin.
CIRM-grantee Sangamo BioSciences announced this week that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had accepted its application to begin a clinical trial using genetically edited stem cells to treat patients with beta-thalassemia. This trial, in patients who require regular blood transfusions to survive, is the ninth CIRM-funded clinical trail to gain clearance from the FDA.

Other clinical trials have used genetically modified stem cells, but they have used various techniques to add a correct gene or silence an unwanted gene. This will be the first clinical trial using one of the newer techniques that actually goes into a person’s genes and edits them to correct a disease. We wrote about this beta-thalassemia project here.

The Sacramento Business Times picked up the company’s press release that quoted Sangamo president Edward Lanphier on the company’s goal, “the aim of providing transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia patients with a one-time treatment for this devastating disease.”

Disease modeling for science wonks. Vivien Marx wrote a feature article for Nature Methods that provides the most thorough review of the use of reprogramed iPS-type stem cells as disease models that I have read. In particular she discusses the power of using new gene editing tools to modify the cells so that when they mature into adult tissues they will display specific disease traits.

Svendsen hopes to use gene-edited iPS type stem cells to fully understand neurodegenerative diseases

Svendsen hopes to use gene-edited iPS type stem cells to fully understand neurodegenerative diseases

She starts with a narrative about CIRM-grantee Clive Svendsen’s work to understand spinal muscular atropohy (SMA) when he was in Wisconsin and to understand amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) now at Cedars Sinai in Los Angeles. She goes on to show just how powerful these gene-edited stem cells can be, but also how difficult it is to use the technology in a way that generates useful information. Marx is a strong science journalist, who for many years has shown a skill at explaining complex technologies.

She also discusses the various iPS cell banks developed around the world including CIRM’s cell bank and the value of having non-gene-edited cells from patients that naturally show the disease traits.

Thorough review of changes at CIRM.
Alex Lash at xconomy wrote an in-depth overview of our president Randy Mills’ plans for the next phase of our agency that Randy calls CIRM 2.0. Calling the plans an extensive “renovation” Lash described the portions of the new structure that were already in place and listed the ones set to come online in the next six months.

As a balanced journalist he runs through some of the highs and lows of our public perception during the initial phase of the agency and then discusses the new tone set by Mills:

“CIRM is less a grant-making government agency than a ‘discerning investor’ that’s going to be ‘as creative and innovative’ as possible in getting treatments approved, Mills says. ‘We have no mission above accelerating stem cell therapies to patients.’ ”

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: new ways to reprogram, shifting attitudes on tissue donation, and hockey legend’s miracle questioned

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Insulin-producing cells produced from skin. Starting with human skin cells a team at the University of Iowa has created iPS-type stem cells through genetic reprogramming and matured those stem cells into insulin-producing cells that successfully brought blood-sugar levels closer to normal when transplanted in mice.

University of Iowa researchers reprogrammed human skin cells to create iPS cells, which were then differentiated in a stepwise fashion to create insulin-producing cells. When these cells were transplanted into diabetic mice, the cells secreted insulin and reduced the blood sugar levels of the mice to normal or near-normal levels. The image shows the insulin-producing cells (right) and precursor cells (left). [Credit: University of Iowa]

University of Iowa researchers reprogrammed human skin cells to create iPS cells, which were then differentiated in a stepwise fashion to create insulin-producing cells. When these cells were transplanted into diabetic mice, the cells secreted insulin and reduced the blood sugar levels of the mice to normal or near-normal levels. The image shows the insulin-producing cells (right) and precursor cells (left).
[Credit: University of Iowa]

The cells did not completely restore blood-sugar levels to normal, but did point to the possibility of achieving that goal in the future, something the team leader Nicholas Zavazava noted in an article in the Des Moines Register, calling the work an “encouraging first step” toward a potential cure for diabetes.

The Register discussed the possibility of making personalized cells that match the genetics of the patient and avoiding the need for immune suppression. This has long been a goal with iPS cells, but increasingly the research community has turned to looking for options that would avoid immune rejection with donor cells that could be off-the-shelf and less expensive than making new cells for each patient.

Heart cells from reprogramming work in mice. Like several other teams, a group in Japan created beating heart cells from iPS-type stem cells. But they went the additional step of growing them into sheets of heart muscle that when transplanted into mice integrated into the animals own heart and beat to the same rhythm.

The team published the work in Cell Transplantation and the news agency AlianzaNews ran a story noting that it has previously been unclear if these cells would get in sync with the host heart muscle. The result provides hope this could be a route to repair hearts damaged by heart attack.

Patient attitudes on donating tissue. A University of Michigan study suggests most folks don’t care how you use body tissue they donate for research if you ask them about research generically. But their attitudes change when you ask about specific research, with positive responses increasing for only one type of research: stem cell research.

On the generic question, 69 percent said go for it, but when you mentioned the possibility of abortion research more than half said no and if told the cells might lead to commercial products 45 percent said nix. The team published their work in the Journal of the American Medical Association and HealthCanal picked up the university’s press release that quoted the lead researcher, Tom Tomlinson, on why paying attention to donor preference is so critical:

“Biobanks are becoming more and more important to health research, so it’s important to understand these concerns and how transparent these facilities need to be in the research they support.”

CIRM has begun building a bank of iPS-type stem cells made from tissue donated by people with one of 11 diseases. We went through a very detailed process to develop uniform informed consent forms to make sure the donors for our cell bank knew exactly how their cells could be used. Read more about the consent process here.

Mainstream media start to question hockey legend’s miracle. Finally some healthy skepticism has arrived. Hockey legend Gordie Howe’s recovery from a pair of strokes just before the holidays was treated by the general media as a true Christmas miracle. The scientific press tried to layer the coverage with some questions of what we don’t know about his case but not the mainstream media. The one exception I saw was Brad Fikes in the San Diego Union Tribune who had to rely on a couple of scientists who were openly speaking out at the time. We wrote about their concerns then as well.

Now two major outlets have raised questions in long pieces back-to-back yesterday and this morning. The Star in hockey-crazed Canada wrote the first piece and New York Magazine wrote today’s. Both raise serious questions about whether stem cells could have been the cause of Howe’s recovery and are valuable additions to the coverage.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: Heart self-repair, MS therapy and genetic screening

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Uncovering mystery of heart self-repair. We have often written about work that tries to get the body’s self-healing mechanisms to do a better job. This is particularly desirable but difficult in heart injury. A CIRM-funded team as Children’s Hospital Los Angeles found some clues to achieving this goal by investigating critters good at it. Neonatal mice have an amazing capacity to repair heart damage for about the first seven days of their life.

A young mouse heart with resting heart muscle cells (red) and proliferating muscle cells (green)

A young mouse heart with resting heart muscle cells (red) and proliferating muscle cells (green)

The team looked at what genetic and molecular systems were active during the period of repair and not active at other times. Senior author of the study, Ellen Lien, described the importance of what they are finding in a press release picked up by ScienceCodex:

“Using models such as zebrafish and neonatal mice that regenerate their hearts naturally, we can begin to identify important molecules that enhance heart repair.”

Good news on MS needed many caveats. Some good news on using stem cell transplants for Multiple Sclerosis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association this week sparked a flurry of news reports. But most of those stories lacked the caveats the study required and generated several calls to our office from desperate patients wanting to try the therapy. HealthDay did a good job of pointing out the hope and the limitations of the therapy and of the clinical trial itself.

Only half of the patients responded, which is still good for what can be such an intractable disease. But, only one subset of patients showed the benefit; ones earlier in the course of the disease with the form known as relapsing-remitting MS. None of the later stage patients responded, which makes some sense because if the transplant is altering the immune system, it would have the most impact when the patient’s immune cells are most actively attacking their nerves.

A personal tale of using genetic screening of embryos. Over the past couple years researchers’ need for new embryonic stem cell lines has declined. As a result, many of the new cell lines registered with the National Institutes of Health in the past year have been ones carrying specific genetic disease traits that have been screened out of consideration by couples using pre-implant genetic diagnosis (PGD) for family planning at in vitro fertilization clinics.

While we have written about this conceptually a feature story posted by the University of Michigan and picked up by ScienceDaily makes it very real through a family’s personal story. A devastating nerve disease called ALD runs in the prospective mother’s family so they decided to use PGD to avoid having a child with the disease, but they took it one step further. They donated the left over embryos that carried the genetic flaw to the university for research. Now they are about to celebrate the first birthday of a healthy son and the researchers have a valuable research tool as one stem cell scientist at the University, Gary Smith, explained:

“Disease-specific human embryonic stem cells are the gold standard for research —the purest pathway to understanding disease establishment and progression, and to discovering ways to prevent or alleviate pain and suffering caused by these diseases.”

UC Davis Surgeons Begin Clinical Trial that Tests New Way to Deliver Stem Cells; Heal Bone Fractures

Each year, approximately 8.9 million people worldwide will suffer a bone fracture. Many of these fractures heal with the help of traditional methods, but for some, the road to recovery is far more difficult.

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After exhausting traditional treatments—such as surgically implanted pins or plates, bed rest and injections to spur bone growth—these patients can undergo a special type of stem cell transplant that directs stem cells extracted from the bone marrow to the fracture site to speed healing.

This procedure has its drawbacks, however. For example, the act of extracting cells from one’s own bone marrow and then injecting them into the fracture site requires two very painful surgical procedures: one to extract the cells, and another to implant them. Recovery times for each procedure, especially in older patients, can be significant.

Enter a team of surgeons at UC Davis. Who last week announced a ‘proof-of-concept’ clinical trial to test a device that can extract and isolate stem cells far more efficiently than before—and allow surgeons to implant the cells into the fracture in just a single surgery.

As described in HealthCanal, he procedure makes use of a reamer-irrigator-aspirator system, or RIA, that normally processes wastewater during bone drilling surgery. As its name implies, this wastewater was thought to be useless. But recent research has revealed that it is chock-full of stem cells.

The problem was that the stem cells were so diluted within the wastewater that they couldn’t be used. Luckily, a device recently developed by Sacramento-based SynGen, Inc., was able to quickly and efficiently extract the cells in high-enough concentrations to then be implanted into the patient. Instead of having to undergo two procedures—the patient now only has to undergo one.

“The device’s small size and rapid capabilities allow autologous stem cell transplantation to take place during a single operation in the operation room rather than requiring two procedures separated over a period of weeks,” said UC Davis surgeon Mark Lee, who is leading the clinical trial. “This is a dramatic difference that promises to make a real impact on healing and patient recovery.”

Hear more from Lee about how stem cells can be used to heal bone fractures in our 2012 Spotlight on Disease.

Stem cell stories that caught our eye: EU approves a cell therapy, second ALS treatment shows promise and new gut cells work

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are groundbreaking science, others are of personal interest to us, and still others are just fun.

Europe approves first 2nd generation stem cell therapy.
While blood stem cells in bone marrow have been used to treat patients with certain blood cancers for more than 40 years, it has been a long wait for other uses of stem cells to gain official nods from regulatory bodies. The first came in 2012 when Canada approved Prochymal a stem cell therapy for kids who have a severe immune reaction after bone marrow transplant for cancer. That therapy helps the patients regulate their immune response and can be life saving.

Now the European Medicines Agency has approved a therapy for repairing eyes with damaged corneas—the first of a new generation of stem cell therapies that replace or repair specific tissues. The therapy uses a type of stem cell found in the eye called a limbal stem cell. An Italian team pioneered the procedure that has successfully restored vision to scores of patients whose eyes were damaged by chemicals or burns. An official with the EMA noted the significance of this approval in an agency press release.

“This recommendation represents a major step forward in delivering new and innovative medicines to patients.”

The BBC broke the news with a brief story, and MSN followed up with a bit more detail. (And no, this did not happen “this week” but it did happen after we went dark for the holidays.) CIRM also funds work with limbal stem cells.

Second type of stem cells shows benefit for ALS patients. Over the past couple years we have been writing about positive early trial results from Neuralstem for its therapy using a nerve stem cell for treating patients with ALS, also called Lou Gehrig’s disease. This week the company Brainstorm reported data showing improvement in most of the patients treated with a type of stem cell found in bone marrow and fat, mesenchymal stem cells.

The Neuralstem trials used donor stem cells and the Brainstorm trial uses a patient’s own cells, hence the drug name NeuOwn. But they have be revved up in the lab so that they secrete large quantities of what are called neurotrophic factors, chemicals that seem to protect nerves from damage by the disease and potentially foster healing of already damaged nerves.

Eleven of 12 patients experienced a decrease in the rate of progression of this normally very aggressive disease. The Israeli company completed its early trials in Israel but began a second stage trial at Massachusetts General Hospital in April. Reuters ran a story about the announcement.

New intestine engineered from stem cells. CIRM-grantee Tracy Grikscheit has previously reported growing tissues that look like intestinal cells and that have all the right cellular dog tags of our guts. Today the university announced she has shown she can grow tissues that actually function like our guts. They can absorb life-sustaining nutrients.

Because her work focuses on the devastating condition that results when a baby is born with insufficient intestine, it was not surprising this morning to find a good story about her work on the web site MotherBoard. The site quotes her on the latest advance:

“What’s important about this study is it’s not just taking pictures of the cells and saying ok, they’re in the proper location. We’re actually also looking at the function, so we’re showing that not only are the cells present that would for example absorb the sugar in your breakfast, but they actually are doing that job of absorbing sugar.”

Grikscheit works at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and you can read about her CIRM-funded work to build new intestine here.


Luck’s role in stem cell mutations key to cancer.
Most of the popular talk about risk and cancer centers on inheriting bad genes and being exposed to nasty chemicals in our daily lives. But a new study says the biggest risk is more akin to a roulette wheel.

A study published in Science by a team at Johns Hopkins looked at 31 types of tissue in our bodies and found that random mutations that occur while our tissue-specific stem cells divide correlates better with cancer risk than what we inherit or environmental risks combined. The Scientist produced one of the more thoughtful pieces of the many on the research that appeared in the media this week.

A personal story about getting into stem cell research. I enjoy hearing about how people get into this fascinating field and the media team at the University of Southern California has provided a good example. They profile recent recruit, Michael Bonaguidi who explains how he made the switch from physical to biological science:

“Growing up on Legos and Lincoln Logs, I was very fascinated with building things. As I took more biology courses and was exposed to other facets of science — from chemistry to physics — I became more interested not in the outside but within. And that’s what got me into bioengineering versus structural engineering.”

Described as shaping brains instead of cities he is looking for the types of cells that can rebuild the brain after injury or stroke. HealthCanal picked up the university’s feature.

Stem Cell Stories that Caught Your Eye: The Most Popular Stem Cellar Stories of 2014

2014 marked an extraordinary year for regenerative medicine and for CIRM. We welcomed a new president, several of our research programs have moved into clinical trials—and our goal of accelerating treatments for patients in need is within our grasp.

As we look back we’d like to revisit The Stem Cellar’s ten most popular stories of 2014. We hope you enjoyed reading them as much as we did reporting them. And from all of us here at the Stem Cell Agency we wish you a Happy Holidays and New Year.

10. UCSD Team Launches CIRM-Funded Trial to Test Safety of New Leukemia Drug

9. Creating a Genetic Model for Autism, with a Little Help from the Tooth Fairy

8. A Tumor’s Trojan Horse: CIRM Researchers Build Nanoparticles to Infiltrate Hard-to-Reach Tumors

7. CIRM funded therapy for type 1 diabetes gets FDA approval for clinical trial

6. New Videos: Living with Crohn’s Disease and Working Towards a Stem Cell Therapy

5. Creativity Program Students Reach New Heights with Stem Cell-Themed Rendition of “Let it Go”

4. Scientists Reach Yet Another Milestone towards Treating Type 1 Diabetes

3. Meet the Stem Cell Agency President C. Randal Mills

2. Truth or Consequences: how to spot a liar and what to do once you catch them

1. UCLA team cures infants of often-fatal “bubble baby” disease by inserting gene in their stem cells; sickle cell disease is next target