If you want to accelerate stem cell therapies then create an Accelerating Center

Buckle up

Buckle up, we’re about to Accelerate

“You can’t teach fish to fly,” is one of the phrases that our CIRM President & CEO, Randy Mills, likes to throw out when asked why we needed to create new centers to help researchers move their most promising therapies out of the lab and into clinical trials.

His point is that many researchers are terrific at research but not so great at the form filling and other process-oriented skills needed to get approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a clinical trial.

So instead of asking them to learn how to do all those things, why don’t we, CIRM, create a system that will do it for them? And that’s where we came up with the idea for the Accelerating Center (we’re also creating a Translating Center – that’s a topic for a future blog but if you can’t wait to find out the juicy details you can find them here.)

The Accelerating Center will be a clinical research organization that provides regulatory, operational and other support services to researchers and companies hoping to get their stem cell therapies into a clinical trial. The goal is to match the scientific skills of researchers with the regulatory and procedural skills of the Accelerating Center to move these projects through the review process as quickly as possible.

But it doesn’t end there. Once a project has been given the green light by the FDA, the Accelerating Center will help with actually setting up and running their clinical trial, and helping them with data management to ensure they get high quality data from the trial. Again these skills are essential to run a good clinical trial but things researchers may not have learned about when getting a PhD.

We just issued what we call an RFA (Request for Applications)  for people interested in partnering with us to help create the Accelerating Center. To kick-start the process we are awarding up to $15 million for five years to create the Center, which will be based in California.

To begin with, the Accelerating Center will focus on supporting CIRM-funded stem cell projects. But the goal is to eventually extend that support to other stem cell programs.

Now, to be honest, there’s an element of self-interest in all this. We have a goal under our new Strategic Plan of funding 50 new clinical trials over the next five years. Right now, getting a stem cell-related project approved is a slow and challenging process. We think the Accelerating Center is one tool to help us change that and give the most promising projects the support they need to get out of the lab and into people.

There’s a lot more we want to do to help speed up the approval process as well, including working with the FDA to create a new, streamlined regulatory process, one that is faster and easier to navigate. But that may take some time. So in the meantime, the Accelerating Center will help “fish” to do what they do best, swim, and we’ll take care of the flying for them.

 

 

 

Super stem cell exhibit opens in San Diego

Stem cell exhibit

The best science museums are like playgrounds. They allow you to wander around, reading, watching and learning and being amazed as you go. It’s not just a feast for the mind; it’s also fun for the hands.  You get to interact with and experience science, pushing buttons, pulling levers, watching balls drop and electricity spark.

The best science museums bring out the kid in all of us.

This Saturday a really great science museum is going to be host to a really great exhibition. The Reuben H. Fleet Science Center in San Diego is the first stop on a California tour for “Super Cells: The Power of Stem Cells”. The exhibit is coming here fresh from a successful tour of Canada and the UK.

The exhibit is a “hands-on” educational display that demonstrates the importance and the power of stem cells, calling them “our body’s master cells.” It uses animations, touch-screen displays, videos and stunning images to engage the eyes and delight the brain.

stem cell exhibit 2Each of the four sections focuses on a different aspect of stem cell research, from basic explanations about what a stem cell is, to how they change and become all the different cells in our body. It has a mini laboratory so visitors can see how research is done; it even has a “treatment” game where you get to implant and grow cells in the eye, to see if you can restore sight to someone who is blind.

 

In a news release the Fleet Science Center celebrated the role that stem cells play in our lives:

“Stem cells are important because each of us is the result of only a handful of tiny stem cells that multiply to produce the 200 different types of specialized cells that exist in our body. Our stem cells continue to be active our whole lives to keep us healthy. Without them we couldn’t survive for more than three hours!”

It is, in short, really fun and really cool.

Of course we might be a tad biased here as we helped produce and develop the exhibit in collaboration with the Sherbrooke Museum of Science and Nature in Canada, the Canadian Stem Cell Network, the Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine in Canada; the Cell Therapy Catapult in the UK, and EuroStemCell.

stem cell exhibit 3

The exhibit is tri-lingual (English, Spanish and French) because our goal was to create a multi-lingual global public education program. San Diego was an obvious choice for the first stop on the California tour (with LA and the Bay Area to follow) because it is one of the leading stem cell research hubs in the U.S., and a region where CIRM has invested almost $380 million over the last ten years.

As our CIRM Board Chair, Jonathan Thomas, said:

“One of our goals at CIRM is to help spread awareness for the importance of stem cell research. San Diego is an epicenter of stem cell science and having this exhibition displayed at the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center is a wonderful opportunity to engage curious science learners of all ages.”

The Super Cells exhibit runs from January 23 to May 1, 2016, in the Main Gallery of the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center. The exhibition is included with the cost of Fleet admission.

For more information, visit the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center website.

Patients beware: warnings about shady clinics and suspect treatments

stem-cells therapy?

Every day we get a call from someone seeking help. Some are battling a life-threatening or life-changing disease. Others call on behalf of a friend or loved one. All are looking for the same thing; a treatment, better still a cure, to ease their suffering.

Almost every day we have to tell them the same thing; that the science is advancing but it’s not there yet. You can almost feel the disappointment, the sense of despair, on the other end of the line.

If it’s hard for us to share that news, imagine how much harder it is for them to hear it. Usually by the time they call us they have exhausted all the conventional therapies. In some cases they are not just running out of options, they are also running out of time.

Chasing hope

Sometimes people mention that they went to the website of a clinic that was offering treatments for their condition, claiming they had successfully treated people with that disease or disorder. This week I had three people mention the same clinic, here in the US, that was offering them “treatments” for multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Three very different problems, but the same approach was used for each one.

It’s easy to see why people would be persuaded that clinics like this could help them. Their websites are slick and well produced. They promise to take excellent care of patients, often helping take care of travel plans and accommodation.

There’s just one problem. They never offer any scientific evidence on their website that the treatments they offer work. They have testimonials, quotes from happy, satisfied patients, but no clinical studies, no results from FDA-approved clinical trials. In fact, if you explore their sites you’ll usually find an FAQ section that says something to the effect of they are “not offering stem cell therapy as a cure for any condition, disease, or injury. No statements or implied treatments on this website have been evaluated or approved by the FDA. This website contains no medical advice.”

What a damning but revealing phrase that is.

Now, it may be that the therapies they are offering won’t physically endanger patients – though without a clinical trial it’s impossible to know that – but they can harm in other ways. Financially it can make a huge dent in someone’s wallet with many treatments costing $10,000 or more. And there is also the emotional impact of giving someone false hope, knowing that there was little, if any, chance the treatment would work.

Shining a light in shady areas

U.C. Davis stem cell researcher, CIRM grantee, and avid blogger Paul Knoepfler, highlighted this in a recent post for his blog “The Niche” when he wrote:

Paul Knoepfler

Paul Knoepfler

“Patients are increasingly being used as guinea pigs in the stem cell for-profit clinic world via what I call stem cell shot-in-the-dark procedures. The clinics have no logical basis for claiming that these treatments work and are safe.

As the number of stem cell clinics continues to grow in the US and more physicians add on unproven stem cell injections into their practices as a la carte options, far more patients are being subjected to risky, even reckless physician conduct.”

As if to prove how real the problem is, within hours of posting that blog Paul posted another one, this time highlighting how the FDA had sent a Warning Letter to the Irvine Stem Cell Treatment Center saying it had serious concerns about the way it operates and the treatments it offers.

Paul has written about these practices many times in the past, sometimes incurring the wrath of the clinic owners (and very pointed letters from their lawyers). It’s to his credit that he refuses to be intimidated and keeps highlighting the potential risks that unapproved therapies pose to patients.

Making progress

As stem cell science advances we are now able to tell some patients that yes, there are promising therapies, based on good scientific research, that are being tested in clinical trials.

There are not as many as we would like and none have yet been approved by the FDA for wider use. But those will come in time.

For now we have to continue to work hard to raise awareness about the need for solid scientific evidence before more people risk undergoing an unproven stem cell therapy.

And we have to continue taking calls from people desperate for help, and tell them they have to be patient, just a little longer.

***

If you are considering a stem cell treatment, the International Society for Stem Cell Research had a terrific online resource, A Closer Look at Stem Cells. In particular, check out the Nine Things to Know about Stem Cell Treatments page.

 

Regenerating damaged muscle after a heart attack

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Images of clusters of heart muscle cells (in red and green) derived from human embryonic stem cells 40 days after transplantation. Courtesy UCLA

Every year more than 735,000 Americans have a heart attack. Many of those who survive often have lasting damage to their heart muscle and are at increased risk for future attacks and heart failure. Now CIRM-funded researchers at UCLA have identified a way that could help regenerate heart muscle after a heart attack, potentially not only saving lives but also increasing the quality of life.

The researchers used human embryonic stem cells to create a kind of cell, called a cardiac mesoderm cell, which has the ability to turn into cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts, smooth muscle, and endothelial cells. All these types of cells play an important role in helping repair a damaged heart.

As those embryonic cells were in the process of changing into cardiac mesoderms, the team was able to identify two key markers on the cell surface. The markers, called CD13 and ROR2 – which makes them sound like extras in the latest Star Wars movie – pinpointed the cells that were likely to be the most efficient at changing into the kind of cells needed to repair damaged heart tissue.

The researchers then transplanted those cells into an animal model and found that not only did many of the cells survive but they also produced the cells needed to regenerate heart muscle and vessels.

Big step forward

The research was published in the journal Stem Cell Reports. Dr. Reza Ardehali, the senior author of the CIRM-funded study, says this is a big step forward in the use of embryonic stem cells to help treat heart attacks:

“In a major heart attack, a person loses an estimated 1 billion heart cells, which results in permanent scar tissue in the heart muscle. Our findings seek to unlock some of the mysteries of heart regeneration in order to move the possibility of cardiovascular cell therapies forward. We have now found a way to identify the right type of stem cells that create heart cells that successfully engraft when transplanted and generate muscle tissue in the heart, which means we’re one step closer to developing cell-based therapies for people living with heart disease.”

More good news

But wait, as they say in cheesy TV infomercials, there’s more. Ardehali and his team not only found the markers to help them identify the right kinds of cell to use in regenerating damaged heart muscle, they also found a way to track the transplanted cells so they could make sure they were going where they wanted them to, and doing what they needed them to.

In a study published in Stem Cells Translational Medicine,  Ardehali and his team used special particles that can be tracked using MRI. They used those particles to label the cardiac mesoderm cells. Once transplanted into the animal model the team was able to follow the cells for up to 40 days.

Ardehali says knowing how to identify the best cells to repair a damaged heart, and then being able to track them over a long period, gives us valuable tools to use as we work to develop better, more effective treatments for people who have had a heart attack.

CIRM is already funding a Phase 2 clinical trial, run by a company called Capricor, using stem cells to treat heart attack patients.

 

National honor for helping “the blind see”

Those of us fortunate to have good health take so many things for granted, not the least of which is our ability to see. But, according to the World Health Organization, there are 39 million people worldwide who are blind, and another 246 million who are visually impaired. Any therapy, any device, that can help change that is truly worthy of celebration.

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Dr. Mark Humayun: Photo courtesy USC

That’s why we are celebrating the news that Professor Mark Humayun has been awarded the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the nation’s top technology honor, by President Obama.

Humayun, a researcher at USC’s Keck School of Medicine and a CIRM grantee, is being honored for his work in developing an artificial retina, one that enables people with a relatively rare kind of blindness to see again.

But we are also celebrating the potential of his work that we are funding that could help restore sight to millions of people suffering from the leading cause of blindness among the elderly. But we’ll get back to that in a minute.

First, let’s talk about the invention that has earned him this prestigious award. It’s called the Argus II and it can help people with retinitis pigmentosa, an inherited degenerative disease that slowly destroys a person’s vision. It affects around 100,000 Americans.

The Argus II uses a camera mounted on glasses that send signals to an electronic receiver that has been implanted inside the eye. The receiver then relays those signals through the optic nerve to the brain where they are interpreted as a visual image.

In a story posted on the USC website, USC President C. L. Max Nikias praised Humayun’s work:

“He dreamed the impossible: to help the blind see. With fearless imagination, bold leadership and biomedical expertise, he and his team made that dream come true with the world’s first artificial retina. USC is tremendously proud to be Professor Humayun’s academic home.”

At CIRM we are tremendously proud to be funding the clinical trial that Humayun and his team are running to find a stem cell therapy for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss in the world.  It’s estimated that by 2020 more than 6 million Americans will suffer from AMD.

Humayun’s team is using embryonic stem cells to produce the support cells, or RPE cells, needed to replace those lost in AMD. We recently produced this video that highlights this work, and other CIRM-funded work that targets vision loss.

In a statement released by the White House honoring all the winners, President Obama said:

“Science and technology are fundamental to solving some of our nation’s biggest challenges. The knowledge produced by these Americans today will carry our country’s legacy of innovation forward and continue to help countless others around the world. Their work is a testament to American ingenuity.”

Which is why we are honored to be partners with Humayun and his team in advancing this research and, hopefully, helping find a treatment for millions of people who dream of one day being able to see again.

 

 

 

 

Students use a 3D printer to sink their teeth into stem cell research

Student winners

L-R Alan Tan, Sid Bommakanti, Daniel Chae – prize winning science students

A 3D printer, some old teeth, and some terrific science were enough to help three high school students develop a new way of growing bone and win a $30,000 prize in a national competition.

The three teamed up for the Siemens Competition in Math, Science & Technology, which bills itself as “the nation’s premier research competition for high school students”.

The trio includes two from the San Francisco Bay area, where we are based; Sid Bommakanti from Amador Valley High School in Pleasanton, and Alan Tan, from Irvington High School in Fremont. The third member of the team, Daniel Chae, goes to Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Alexandria, Virginia.

The three used mesenchymal stem cells – which are capable of being turned into muscle, cartilage or bone – which they got from the dental pulp found in wisdom teeth that had been extracted.

In a story posted on the KQED website Tan says they thought it would be cool to take something that is normally thrown away, and recycle it:

“When we learned we could take stem cells from teeth—it’s actually part of medical waste—we realized could turn this into bone cells,”

The students used a 3D printer to create a kind of scaffold out of a substance called polylatctic acid – it’s an ingredient found in corn starch or sugar cane. The scaffold had a rough surface, something they hoped would help stimulate the dental pulp to grow on it and become bone.

That’s what happened. The students were able to show that their work produced small clusters of cells that were growing on the scaffold, cells that were capable of maturing into bone. This could be used to create dental implants to replace damaged teeth, and, according to Alan Tan, to repair other injuries:

“We used dental pulp stem cells so that we could regenerate bones in various parts of our body so for example we could fix bones in your jaw and tibia and other places.”

The beauty of this approach is that the scaffold and bone could be implanted in, say, the mouth and then as the scaffold disintegrates the new bone would be left in place.

While they didn’t take the top prize (a $100,000 scholarship) they did have to see off some serious competition from nearly 1,800 other student project submissions to win a Team scholarship award.

The students say they learned a lot working together, and encouraged other high school students who are interested in science to take part in competitions like this one.

Sid Bommakanti “Both me, Alan and our other partner are interested in medicine as a whole and we wanted to make an impact on other people’s lives.”

Alan Tan: “I would say get into science early. Don’t be afraid to put yourself out there and talk to professors, talk to people, competitions like this are beneficial because they encourage students to get out there and interact with the real world.”

CIRM is helping students like these through its Stem Cell Education Portal,  which includes the materials and resources that teachers need to teach high school students about stem cells. All the materials meet both state and federal guidelines.

 

 

A meeting of minds: breaking down communication barriers between patients and doctors

dp-relation

One of the things that has always surprised me about stem cell research, or any scientific research, is that so often the people with most at stake never meet. Researchers spend most of their time in the lab trying to develop new treatments so they don’t often get to meet the people who are depending on them to save or improve their lives, the patients.

To try and change that dynamic two Canadian medical groups recently brought together a mixture of researchers, health care professionals, patients and patient advocates to find ways to improve communications between these groups. The hope was that with better communication and better information they would collectively be able to make better decisions about how to manage patient health.

Communication barriers

Lisa Willemse, a writer who has worked with CIRM on some of our projects in the past, wrote a wonderful piece about the meeting for the online magazine Medium. In it she explores some of the areas that create communication barriers between these groups and how those barriers can be overcome.

The problems caused by these barriers are not trivial. They can result in patients not knowing about potentially life-saving clinical trials in the US, or turning to unproven, experimental therapies offered at overseas clinics. (Here’s a document that addresses some of those issues)

Lisa quotes one patient as saying:

“I didn’t know what I didn’t know! I had filled out an application online was accepted to a stem cell clinic in Panama. The cost per treatment was $21,000 and I didn’t know what questions to ask!”

Finding solutions

Happily the meeting came up with some thoughtful, really positive suggestions on ways to overcome these barriers. These include:

  • Ensuring specialists and other health care practitioners are kept up-to-date with clinical trial information, since these are where they turn first for advice.
  • Providing more support for patients from health care providers. They should not be expected to have all the answers but should at least be able to advise on informed consent and provide credible resources.
  • Developing improved ways to search for relevant clinical trials.
  • Creating basic explainers on clinical trials for patients to help them determine eligibility and understand protocol.

There were also suggestions on how researchers can do a better job of communicating with non-scientists, such as using jargon-free language to answer questions and providing a list of questions people should ask when considering any stem cell therapy. Here’s an infographic we put together on that topic.

Lessons learned

This meeting is a great example of the power and importance of bringing together these different groups, all of whom have shared interests and goals. It starts with a conversation that begins to break down barriers. Hopefully it gives doctors ideas on how they can better equip patients to make informed decisions about clinical trials; by meeting patients it helps researchers put a human face on the work they are doing; and hopefully it gives patients a sense that their voices are being heard, and their needs addressed.

This was one relatively small meeting in Canada but the lessons learned apply to every state, and every country and could point the way to creating a more responsive health care system that better meets the needs of all those involved.

 

Board gives stem cell institute marching orders, and a road map

The poet T. S. Eliot once wrote: “If you aren’t in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?” Well, everyone at CIRM, California’s stem cell institute, is about to find out how tall we are.

Strategic Plan coverYesterday our governing Board approved a new Strategic Plan. To call it ambitious might be considered an understatement. Among the goals it commits us to achieving are:

  • Funding 50 new clinical trials in 5 years including 10 for rare or orphan disorders and 5 in conditions affecting children
  • Fostering enactment of a new, more efficient federal regulatory approval process for stem cell treatments
  • Introducing 50 new therapeutic candidates or devices into the development pipeline
  • Reducing the time it takes to move a stem cell treatment from the earliest Discovery stage into a clinical trial by 50%
  • Increasing the number of projects moving to the next stage of development by 50%

No easy task

Each goal by itself might be considered challenging. Taken together they are likely to stretch us all. And yet that’s why we joined CIRM, why we feel fortunate to be part of this mission. We have a chance to be part of a movement that could change the face of medicine as we know it. We knew it wouldn’t be easy. But now we know what we have to do to help achieve that.

As Randy Mills, our President and CEO, said in a news release, the goal in developing this Strategic Plan was to create a clear vision for the next five years of the Institute:

”We have around $900 million left to work with and we wanted a plan that used that money to the best possible effect, maximizing our chances of pushing as many new treatments to patients as possible. We didn’t want something ‘good enough’, we wanted something ‘great’. This plan is extremely ambitious, but also realistic in the goals it sets out and the way those goals can be met.”

The Strategic Plan – you can read it in full here – doesn’t just lay out goals, it also creates a road map on how to meet those goals. They include engaging industry more, being more creative in how we move the most promising projects from one stage of research to the next, and finding ways to change the regulatory approval process to help remove obstacles and speed up the progress of these therapies into clinical trials.

Aiming high

We know we may not achieve all our goals. As Randy Mills said at our Board meeting: “This is a difficult plan. These goals are not easy to achieve.” There are always risks in pursuing something so big and ambitious but no one ever achieved anything truly worthwhile by playing it safe. We are not interested in playing it safe.

We may start out by being, as T. S. Eliot put it “in over our heads”. But we’re confident we’ll be able to grow tall enough to make this plan work.

As Randy Mills told the Board: “If we are all in this together then the probability of success is high, and if we are successful then all this would have been worthwhile.”

Doing nothing is not OK: A call for change at the FDA

FDA-NotApprovedStampThe US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is caught between a rock and a hard place. And CIRM is going to try and help them get out from under that.

As things stand today, if the FDA approves a therapy quickly and a patient later dies from it, then they are widely criticized. If they take a long time to approve a therapy and people die waiting for that treatment, then they are just as widely criticized.

So maybe it’s time to help them change that, by creating a new pathway that allows for a faster, more efficient, but equally safe, process of approving stem cell therapies.

This was a topic that CIRM’s President and CEO, Dr. Randy Mills, took on at last week’s World Stem Cell Summit. He highlighted our mission – accelerating stem cell therapies to patients with unmet medical needs – as the driving force behind everything we do, including regulatory reform:

“We have had the current FDA regulatory structure for cell therapy in place for 15 years, and in that 15 years not one stem cell therapy has been approved. The scoreboard is not lying, there’s a zero on it. Not one therapy has been approved. There is an issue here, we can’t ignore that fact and so we made it part of our proposed new Strategic Plan to try and remove this burden.

“There is an excessively long translational pathway to get an Investigational New Drug (IND) approval from the FDA (a necessary step to proceed with testing a therapy in a clinical trial). For non-cell therapies it takes 3-4 years to get an IND. For cell therapies it takes 6-8 years, twice as long.”

Mills says many potential therapies have been abandoned, or even stopped before they even got started, simply because the regulatory hurdles are so many and the costs so high.

“We are not anti-regulation, we are not anti-FDA, and we are not calling for the removal of rules and regulations around stem cell therapies, that would be bad for patients and research. These therapies have risks and we are not proposing any strategy that puts things on the market without any testing or safety data. But right now we are being so careful about safety to ensure patients are not put at risk while those same patients are dying from their disease.”

Chaohong Fan, MD, PhD, a Medical Officer at the FDA was in the audience and said the people at the FDA really want to help, that they feel it’s part of their mission.

Mills said he had no doubts that the people at the FDA are committed and passionate about what they do. He says it’s not that people at the FDA aren’t working, it’s that the process isn’t working, and needs to be transformed.

“At CIRM we are saying doing nothing is not OK. It’s not OK. So we are going to be working with patients and patient advocates, companies, researchers and the FDA to make change, to make it easier for patients to get access to the therapies they need.”

 

Why “Right to Try” laws are more feel good than do good

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L to R: Don Gibbons, CIRM; Jeanne Loring; Beth Roxland; Aaron Levine

In the last few years some 24 states have approved so-called “Right to Try” laws. These are intended to give terminally ill patients faster and easier access to experimental therapies. But a panel of experts at the World Stem Cell Summit in Atlanta today said they are more symbolic than anything and do little to actually help patients get much-needed therapies.

The Right to Try laws are modeled after a federal law that allows “compassionate use” of experimental medications and lets doctors prescribe investigational medicines being safely used in early stage clinical trials.

Beth Roxland, a bioethicist with Johnson & Johnson, says the name of the law is misleading:

“If you look at the actual text of these laws they only say you have the right to “ask” for these drugs. That right already exists in federal law but neither federal law nor these Right to Try laws say you have the right to access.”

Aaron Levine from Georgia Tech says it’s also misleading to assume that just because a state passes a Right to Try law that it has any legal impact. He says state laws don’t over rule the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) regulation of this area and so the federal government would still have the authority to stop this kind of access.

But Levine says these laws are interesting in that they are indicative of the growing determination of patients and patient advocates to work around obstacles to access and have a bigger say in their own care.

One of the audience members, William Decker from Baylor College of Medicine, says that in Texas a law was recently crafted saying that as long as a potential therapy had gone through a Phase 1 safety trial it should be offered to the public and the public should be able to pay for it.

“If you know how clinical trials work you know you can get almost any schlock through a Phase 1 trial and the kinds of things that you can get to the public without any idea if they work often turn out to not be very useful. We saw this as an avenue to promote fraud, and the last thing you should be doing to a dying patient is take their money or divert their attention away from something that might help them.”

Decker and his colleagues argued before the Texas Legislature that potential therapies should at least have to go through a Phase 2 trial to make sure they were not only safe but also showed some benefit for patients. In the end Texas lawmakers rejected the Phase 2 idea but did say patients could not be charged for the therapy, and there could be no compensation from insurers or anyone else for the manufacturer of the therapy.

He says removing the financial benefits and incentives pretty much ensured that no company would offer patients a therapy under this law.

Jeanne Loring, a CIRM grantee from the Scripps Research Institute, says that likely won’t stop other clinics in other states:

“Some stem cell clinics are using adipose (stem cells derived from fat) therapy as an option for every disease imaginable and I’m sure some will take advantage of these laws to say it gives them the right to offer these to patients and the patients will pay for them directly. “

Roxland says that may already be happening:

“I think there is some evidence on the stem cell side that companies have popped up in states that have these laws, to make it easier to offer their therapies to patients.”

The panel agreed that in most cases these laws don’t give patients any rights they don’t already have, but do give the appearance of making access easier. They said it’s feel-good legislation, allowing people to feel they are doing something without actually doing anything.

Aaron Levine said that while some companies may try to take advantage of these laws, the most serious ones won’t:

 “Almost any legitimate company that wants an FDA approved product wouldn’t want to take advantage of these laws. It could put their product at risk. Most companies that need to work with the FDA have no incentive to go this route.”