October ICOC Board Meeting to Begin Soon

The October ICOC Board Meeting begins this morning in Los Angeles, CA.

The complete agenda can be found here, including a special Spotlight on Disease focusing on Retinitis Pigmentosa.

For those not able to attend, you are welcome to dial in!

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We will be providing a summary of today’s highlights after the meeting—so stay tuned!

CIRM-Funded Scientists Make New Progress Toward Engineering a Human Esophagus

Creating tissues and organs from stem cells—often referred to as ‘tissue engineering’—is hard. But new research has discovered that the process may in fact be a little easier than we once thought, at least in some situations.

Engineered human esophageal tissue [Credit: The Saban Research Institute].

Engineered human esophageal tissue [Credit: The Saban Research Institute].

Last week, scientists at The Saban Research Institute of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles announced that the esophagus—the tube that transports food, liquid and saliva between the mouth and the stomach—can be grown inside animal models after injecting the right mix of early-stage, or ‘progenitor,’ esophageal cells.

These findings, published in the journal Tissue Engineering Part A, are an important step towards generating tissues and organs that have been damaged due to disease or—in some cases—never existed in the first place.

According to stem cell researcher Tracy Grikscheit, who led the CIRM-funded study, the researchers first implanted a biodegradable ‘scaffold’ into laboratory mice. They then injected human progenitor cells into the mice and watched as they first traveled to the correct location—and then began to grow. The ability to both migrate to the right location and differentiate into the right cell type, without the need for any external coaxing, is crucial if scientists are to successfully engineer such a critical type of tissue.

“Different progenitor cells can find the right ‘partner’ in order to grow into specific esophageal cell types—and without the need for [outside] growth factors,” explained Grikscheit in a news release. “This means that successful tissue engineering of the esophagus is simpler than we previously thought.”

Grikscheit, who is also a pediatric surgeon as Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, was particularly hopeful with how their findings might one day be used to treat children born with portions of the esophagus missing—as well as adults suffering from esophageal cancer, the fastest-growing cancer in the U.S.

“We have demonstrated that a simple and versatile, biodegradable polymer is sufficient for the growth of a tissue-engineered esophagus from human cells. This not only serves as a potential source of tissue, but also a source of knowledge—as there are no other robust models available for studying esophageal stem cell dynamics.”

Want to learn more about tissue engineering? Check out these video highlights from a recent CIRM Workshop on the field.

UCLA Study Suggests New Way to Mend a Broken Heart

When you suffer a heart attack, your heart-muscle cells become deprived of oxygen. Without oxygen, the cells soon whither and die—and are entombed within scar tissue. And once these cells die, they can’t be brought back to life.

But maybe—just maybe—there is another way to build new heart muscle. And if there is, scientists like Dr. Arjun Deb at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), are hot on the trail to find it.

Scar forming cells (in red) in a region of the injured heart expressing blood vessel cell marker in green and thus appearing yellow (see arrows). This study observed that approximately a third of the scar-forming cells in the injured region of the heart adopted "blood vessel" cell-like characteristics. [Credit: Dr. Arjun Deb/Nature]

Scar forming cells (in red) in a region of the injured heart expressing blood vessel cell marker in green and thus appearing yellow (see arrows). This study observed that approximately a third of the scar-forming cells in the injured region of the heart adopted “blood vessel” cell-like characteristics. [Credit: Dr. Arjun Deb/Nature]

Published yesterday in the journal Nature, Deb and his team at UCLA’s Eli & Edythe Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research have found some scar-forming cells in the heart have the ability to become blood vessel-forming cells—if given the proper chemical ‘boost.’

“It is well known that increasing the number of blood vessels in the injured heart following a heart attack improves its ability to heal,” said Deb. “We know that scar tissue in the heart is associated with poor prognosis. Reversing or preventing scar tissue from forming has been one of the major challenges in cardiovascular medicine.”

Tackling the ever-growing problem in heart disease can seem an almost insurmountable task. While heart disease claims more lives worldwide than any other disease, advances in modern medicine in recent decades mean that more and more people are surviving heart attacks, and living with what’s called ‘heart failure,’ for their hearts can no longer beat at full capacity, and they have trouble taking long walks or even going up a flight of stairs.

Transforming this scar tissue into functioning heart muscle has therefore been the focus of many research teams, including CIRM grantees such as Drs. Deepak Srivastava and Eduardo Marbán, who have each tackled the problem from different angles. Late last year, treatment first designed by Marbán and developed by Capricor Therapeutics got the green light for a Phase 2 Clinical Trial.

In this study, Deb and his team focused on scar-forming cells, called fibroblasts, and blood-vessel forming cells, called endothelial cells. Previously, experiments in mice revealed that many fibroblasts literally transformed into endothelial cells—and helped contribute to blood vessel formation in the injured area of the heart. The team noted this phenomenon has been called the mesenchymal-endothelial transition, or MEndoT.

In this study, the researchers identified the molecular mechanism behind MEndoT—and further identified a small molecule that can enhance this transition, thus boosting the formation of blood vessels in the injured heart. This study bolsters the idea of focusing on the creation of blood vessels as a way to help reverse damage caused by a heart attack. Said Deb:

“Our findings suggest the possibility of coaxing scar-forming cells in the heart to change their identity into blood vessel-forming cells, which could potentially be a useful approach to better heart repair.”

Cranking it Up to Eleven: Heightened Growth of Neural Stem Cells Linked to Autism-like Behavior

Autism is not one single disease but a suite of many, which is why researchers have long struggled to understand its underlying causes. Often referred to as the Autism Spectrum Disorders, autism has been linked to multiple genetic and environmental factors—different combinations of which can all result in autism or autistic-like behavior.

Could an unusual boost in neural stem cell growth during pregnancy be linked to autistim-like behavior in children?

Could an unusual boost in neural stem cell growth during pregnancy be linked to autitism-like behavior in children?

But as we first reported in last week’s Weekly Roundup, scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) have identified a new factor that can occur during pregnancy and that may be linked to the development of autism-like behavior. These results shed new light on a notoriously murky condition.

UCLA scientist Dr. Harley Kornblum led the study, which was published last week in the journal Stem Cell Reports.

In it, Kornblum and his team describe how inflammation in pregnant mice, known as ‘maternal inflammation’ caused a spike in the production of neural stem cells—cells that one day develop into mature brain cells, such as neurons and glia cells. This abnormal growth, the team argues, led to enlarged brains in the newborn mice and, importantly, autism-like behavior such as decreased vocalization and social behavior, as well as overall increase in anxiety and repetitive behaviors, such as grooming. As Kornblum explained in a news release:

“We have now shown that one way maternal inflammation could result in larger brains and, ultimately, autistic behavior is through the activation of the neural stem cells that reside in the brain of all developing and adult mammals.”

However, Kornblum notes that many environmental factors may cause inflammation during pregnancy—and the inflammation itself is not thought to directly cause autism.

“Autism is a complex group of disorders, with a variety of causes. Our study shows a potential way that maternal inflammation could be one of those contributing factors, even if it is not solely responsible, through interactions with known risk factors.”

These known risk factors include genetic mutations, such as those to a gene called PTEN, which have been shown to increase one’s risk for autism.

Further research by Kornblum’s team further clarified the connection between inflammation and neural stem cell overgrowth. Specifically, they noticed a series of chemical reactions, known as a molecular pathway, appeared to stimulate the growth of neural stem cells in the developing mice. The identification of pathways such as these are vital when exploring new types of therapies—because once you know the pathway’s role in disease, you can then figure out how to change it.

“The discovery of these mechanisms has identified new therapeutic targets for common autism-associated risk factors,” said Dr. Janel Le Belle, the paper’s lead author. “The molecular pathways that are involved in these processes are ones that can be manipulated and possibly even reversed pharmacologically.”

These findings also support previous clinical findings that the roots of autism likely begin in the womb and continue to develop after birth.

One key difference between this work and previous studies, however, was that most studies point to irregularities in the way that neurons are connected as a key factor that leads to autism. This study points to not just a network ‘dysregulation,’ but also perhaps an overabundance of neurons overall.

“Our hypothesis—that one potential means by which autism may develop is through an overproduction of cells in the brain, which then results in altered connectivity—is a new way of thinking about autism.”

Advances in the fields of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine have given new hope to families caring for autistic loved ones. Read more about one such family in our Stories of Hope series. You can also learn more about how CIRM-funded researchers are building our understanding of autism in our recent video: Reversing Autism in the Lab with help from Stem Cells and the Tooth Fairy.

Scientists Reach Yet Another Milestone towards Treating Type 1 Diabetes

There was a time when having type 1 diabetes was equivalent to a death sentence. Now, thanks to advances in science and medicine, the disease has shifted from deadly to chronic.

But this shift, doctors argue, is not good enough. The disease still poses significant health risks, such as blindness and loss of limbs, as the patients get older. There has been a renewed effort, therefore, to develop superior therapies—and those based on stem cell technology have shown significant promise.

Human stem cell-derived beta cells that have formed islet like clusters in a mouse. Cells were transplanted to the kidney capsule and photo was taken two weeks later by which time the beta cells are making insulin and have cured the mouse's diabetes. [Credit: Douglas Melton]

Human stem cell-derived beta cells that have formed islet like clusters in a mouse. Cells were transplanted to the kidney capsule and photo was taken two weeks later by which time the beta cells are making insulin and have cured the mouse’s diabetes. [Credit: Douglas Melton]

Indeed, CIRM-funded scientists at San Diego-based Viacyte, Inc. recently received FDA clearance to begin clinical trials of their VC-01 product candidate that delivers insulin via healthy beta cells contained in a permeable, credit card-sized pouch.

And now, scientists at Harvard University have announced a technique for producing mass quantities of mature beta cells from embryonic stem cells in the lab. The findings, published today in the journal Cell, offer additional hope for the millions of patients and their families looking for a better way to treat their condition.

The team’s ability to generate billions of healthy beta cells—cells within the pancreas that produce insulin in order to maintain normal glucose levels—has a particular significance to the study’s senior author and co-scientific director of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Dr. Doug Melton. 23 years ago, his infant son Sam was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and since that time Melton has dedicated his career to finding better therapies for his son and the millions like him. Melton’s daughter, Emma, has also been diagnosed with the disease.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s immune system systematically targets and destroys the pancreas’ insulin-producing beta cells.

In this study, the team took human embryonic stem cells and transformed them into healthy beta cells. They then transplanted them into mice that had been modified to mimic the signs of diabetes. After closely monitoring the mice for several weeks, they found that their diabetes was essentially ‘cured.’ Said Melton:

“You never know for sure that something like this is going to work until you’ve tested it numerous ways. We’ve given these cells three separate challenges with glucose in mice and they’ve responded appropriately; that was really exciting.”

The researchers are undergoing additional pre-clinical studies in animal models, including non-human primates, with the hopes that the 150 million cells required for transplantation are also protected from the body’s immune system, and not destroyed.

Melton’s team is collaborating with Medical Engineer Dr. Daniel G. Anderson at MIT to develop a protective implantation device for transplantation. Said Anderson of Melton’s work:

“There is no question that the ability to generate glucose-responsive, human beta cells through controlled differentiation of stem cells will accelerate the development of new therapeutics. In particular, this advance opens the doors to an essentially limitless supply of tissue for diabetic patients awaiting cell therapy.”

Policy Matters: Stem Cells and the Public Interest

Guest Author Geoff Lomax is CIRM’s Senior Officer for Medical and Ethical Standards.

In the spirit of Stem Cell Awareness Day, Cell Stem Cell has compiled a “Public Interest” collection of articles covering ethical, legal, and social implications of stem cell research and made it freely available. The collection may be found here.

shutterstock_169882310

The collection covers issues ranging from research involving human embryos to the use of stem cell therapies in patients. For those of you interested in a good primer on the history of stem cell controversies, Herbert Gottweis provides a detailed review of the federal policy debate in the United States. This debate has resulted in inconsistent policy and disrupted research. Gottweis uses this history to support his message that a “comprehensive, and proactive policy approach in this field beyond the quick legal fix” is needed for patients to ultimately benefit from the science.

What I found most interesting about this collection was the focus on stem cell treatments and “tourism.” A majority of the articles address the use of stem cells in patients. This focus is an indicator of how far the field has progressed. Stem cells clinical trials are now a reality and this results in two separated but related considerations. First, is how to make sure prospective patients are well informed should they participate in a clinical trial. Second, how to avoid stem cell “snake oil” where someone is pitching an unproven procedure. These issues are related by their solution that involves empowerment and education of patients and their support networks.

For example, in Stem Cell Tourism and Public Education: The Missing Elements, Master writes:

“It is important for the scientific, medical, ethics, and policy communities to continue to promote accurate patient and public information on stem cell research and tourism and to ensure that it is effectively disseminated to patients by working alongside patient advocacy groups.”

Master’s team found that groups committed to the advancement of good science, including patient advocates and researchers, often lacked basic information about clinical trials and other options for patients. This lack of information may contribute to patients being wooed by those pitching unproven procedures. Thus, the research community should continue to work with patients and advocacy organizations to identity options for treatment.

Another aspect of patient empowerment is what Insoo Huyn refers to as “therapeutic hope” in his piece: Therapeutic Hope, Spiritual Distress, and the Problem of Stem Cell Tourism. Huyn suggests that a supportive system for delivering cell therapies should includes nurturing hope. He writes, “patients might understand when an intervention’s chances of success are extremely remote at best, but may still want to ‘‘give it a shot’’ as long as a beneficial outcome cannot be ruled out as categorically impossible.” Huyn recognizes that well developed early-stage clinical trials are not expected to provide a benefit to patients (they are designed to evaluate safety), but the nature of the therapeutic (often cells) means there may be some real effect.

A third piece by the ISSCR Ethics Taskforce titled Patients Beware: Commercialized Stem Cell Treatments on the Web presents a guide to evaluating therapies. They present five principles that patients, researchers and advocates can rally around to identify credible interventions. The taskforce states:

The guiding principles for the development of the recommended process were that (1) the standards for identifying and reviewing clinics and suppliers should be objective and clear; (2) the inquiry and review process should be publicly transparent and relatively straight- forward for any clinic or practitioner to comply with; (3) conflicts of interest, if any, of the declarant ought to be disclosed to the ISSCR; (4) there should be no actual or apparent conflicts of interest of staff or others involved in the inquiry or review process for any particular matter; and (5) any findings that a clinic fails to meet standards should be communicated in a specific factual way, rather than with broad conclusions of fraudulent practices.

While the Cell Stem Cell Public Interest series covers a range of issues related to stem cells and society, the emphasis on treatments and patients is a reminder of how far the field has come. There is broad consensus that patients, researchers and advocates have roles to play in advancing safe and effective cell therapies.

Geoff Lomax

These Are the Cells You’re Looking for: Scientists Devise New Way to Extract Bone-Making Stem Cells from Fat

Buried within our fat tissue are stashes of stem cells—a hidden reservoir of cells that, if given the right cues, can transform into cells that make up bone, cartilage or fat. These cells therefore represent a much-needed store for regenerative therapies that rebuild bone or cartilage lost to disease or injury.

Finding cells that have bone-making potential is more efficiently done by looking at the genes they express (in this case, ALPL) than at proteins on their surface. The bone matrix being produced by cells is stained red in samples of cells that do not express ALPL (left), those that do express ALPL (right). [Credit: Darling lab/Brown University]

Finding cells that have bone-making potential is more efficiently done by looking at the genes they express (in this case, ALPL) than at proteins on their surface. The bone matrix being produced by cells is stained red in samples of cells that do not express ALPL (left), those that do express ALPL (right). The center image shows both types of cells prior to sorting [Credit: Darling lab/Brown University]

The only problem with these tucked-away cellular reservoirs, however, is identifying them and getting them out.

But now, researchers at Brown University have devised a unique method of identifying, extracting and then cultivating these bone-producing stem cells. Their results, published today in the journal Stem Cell Research & Therapy, seem to offer a much-needed alternative resource for growing bone.

Traditional methods attempting to locate and extract these stem cells focused on proteins that reside on the surface of the cells. Find the proteins, scientists reasoned, and you’ve found the cell.

Unfortunately, that method was not fool proof, and many argued that it wasn’t finding all the cells that reside in the fat tissue. So Brown scientists, led by Dr. Eric Darling found an alternative.

They knew that a gene called ALPL is an indicator of bone-making cells. If the gene is switched on, the cell has the potential to make bone. If it’s switched off, it does not. So Darling and his team devised a fluorescent marker, or tag, that stuck to the cells with activated ALPL. They then used a special machine to sort the cells: those that glowed went into one bucket, those that did not went into the other.

To prove that these ALPL-activated cells were indeed capable of becoming bone and cartilage, they then cultivated them for several weeks in a petri dish. Not only did they transform into the right cell types—they did so in greater numbers than cells extracted using traditional methods.

Hetal Marble, a graduate student in Darling’s lab and the paper’s first author, argues that tagging genes—rather than surface proteins—in order to distinguish and weed out cell types represents an important paradigm shift in the field. As he stated in a press release:

“Approaches like this allow us to isolate all the cells that are capable of doing what we want, whether they fit the archetype of what a stem cell is or is not. The paradigm shift is thinking about isolating populations that are able to achieve an end point rather than isolating populations that fit a strictly defined archetype.”

While their method is both precise and accurate, there is one drawback: it is slow.

Currently, it takes four days to tag, extract and cultivate the bone-making cells. In the future, the team hopes they can shorten this time frame so that they could perform the required steps within a single surgical session. As Darling stated:

“If you can take a patient into the OR, isolate a bunch of their cells, sort them and put them back in—that’s ideally where we’d like to go with this.”

See You Next Week: 2014 Stem Cell Meeting on the Mesa

Next week marks the fourth annual Stem Cell Meeting on the Mesa (SCMOM) Partnering Forum in La Jolla, California and CIRM , one of the main organizers, hopes to see you there.

SCMOM

SCMOM is the first and only meeting organized specifically for the regenerative medicine and cell therapy sectors. The meeting’s unique Partnering Forum brings together a network of companies—including large pharma, investors, research institutes, government agencies and philanthropies seeking opportunities to expand key relationships in the field. The meeting will feature presentations by 50 leading companies in the fields of cell therapy, gene therapy and tissue engineering.

Co-founded by CIRM and the Alliance for Regenerative Medicine (ARM), SCMOM has since grown both in participants and in quality. As Geoff MacKay, President and CEO of Organogenesis, Inc. and ARM’s Chairman, stated in a recent news release:

“This year the Partnering Forum has expanded to include an emphasis not only on cell therapies, but also gene and gene-modified cell therapy technologies. This, like the recent formation of ARM’s Gene Therapy Section, is a natural progression for the meeting as the advanced therapies sector expands.”

This year CIRM President and CEO Dr. C. Randal Mills, as well as Senior Vice President, Research & Development Dr. Ellen Feigal will be speaking to attendees. In addition, 12 CIRM grantees will be among the distinguished speakers, including Drs. Jill Helms, Don Kohn and Clive Svendsen, as well as leaders from Capricor, Asterias, ViaCyte, Sangamo Biosciences and others.

CIRM has made tremendous progress advancing stem cell therapies to patients and expects to have ten approved clinical trials by the end of 2014. The trials which span a variety of therapeutic areas using several therapeutic strategies such as cell therapy, monoclonal antibodies and small molecules are increasingly being partnered with major industry players. CIRM still has more than $1 billion to invest and is interested in co-funding with industry and investors—don’t miss the chance to strike the next partnership at SCMOM next week.

For more details and to view the agenda, please visit: http://stemcellmeetingonthemesa.com/

Cells’ Knack for Hoarding Proteins Inadvertently Kickstarts the Aging Process

Even cells need to take out the trash—mostly damaged or abnormal proteins—in order to maintain a healthy clean environment. And scientists are now uncovering the harmful effects when cells instead begin to hoard their garbage.

Cells' penchant for hoarding proteins may spur the cellular aging process, according to new research.

Cells’ penchant for hoarding proteins may spur the cellular aging process, according to new research. [Labyrinth (1986)]

Aging, on the cellular level is—at its core—the increasing inability for cells to repair themselves over time. As cells begin to break down faster than they can be repaired, the risk of age-related diseases escalates. Cancer, heart disease and neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease are some of aging’s most deadly effects.

As a result, scientists have long searched for ways to give our cells a little help and improve our quality of life as we age. For example, recent research has pointed to a connection between fasting (restricting calories) and a longer lifespan, though the molecular mechanisms behind this connection remain somewhat cryptic.

But now Dr. Daniel Gottschling, a scientist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and an aging expert, has made extraordinary progress toward solving some of the mysteries of aging.

In two studies published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and eLife, Gottschling and colleagues discover that a particular long-lasting protein builds up over time in certain cell types, causing the buildup of a protein hoard that damages the cell beyond repair.

Clearing out the Cobwebs

Some cells, such as those that make up the skin or that reside in the gut, are continually replenished by a stockpile of adult stem cells. But other cells, such as those found in the eye and brain, last for years, decades and—in some cases—our entire lifetimes.

Within and surrounding these long-lived cells are similarly long-lived proteins which help the cell perform essential functions. For example, the lens of the human eye, which helps focus light, is made up of these proteins that arise during embryonic development and last for a lifetime.

Dr. Daniel Gottschling is looking to unlock the mysteries behind cellular aging.

Dr. Daniel Gottschling is looking to unlock the mysteries behind cellular aging. [Image courtesy of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center]

“Shortly after you’re born, that’s it, you get no more of that protein and it lives with you the rest of your life,” explained Gottschling.

As a result, if those proteins degrade and die, new ones don’t replace them—the result is the age-related disease called cataracts.

But scientists weren’t exactly sure of the relationship between these dying proteins and the onset of conditions such as cataracts, and other disease related to aging. Did these conditions occur because the proteins were dying? Or rather because the proteins were building up to toxic levels?

So Gottschling and his team set up a series of experiments to find out.

Stashing Trash

They developed a laboratory model by using yeast cells. Interestingly, yeast cells share several key properties with human stem cells, and are often the focus of early-stage research into basic, fundamental concepts of biology.

Like stem cells, yeast cells grow and divide asymmetrically. In other words, a ‘mother’ cell will produce many ‘daughter’ cells, but will itself remain intact. In general, yeast mother cells produce up to 35 daughter cells before dying—which usually takes just a few days.

 Yeast “mother” cells budding and giving birth to newborn “daughter” cells.  [Image courtesy of Dr. Kiersten Henderson / Gottschling Lab]

Yeast “mother” cells budding and giving birth to newborn “daughter” cells.
[Image courtesy of Dr. Kiersten Henderson / Gottschling Lab]

Here, the research team used a special labeling technique that marked individual proteins that exist within and surrounding these mother cells. These microscopic tracking devices then told researchers how these proteins behaved over the entire lifespan of the mother cell as it aged.

The team found a total of 135 long-lived proteins within the mother cell. But what really surprised them was what they found upon closer examination: all but 21 of these 135 proteins appeared to have no function. They appeared to be trash.

“No one’s ever seen proteins like this before [in aging],” said Nathanial Thayer, a graduate student in the Gottschling Lab and lead author of one of the studies.

Added Gottschling, “With the number of different fragments [in the mother cell], we think they’re going to cause trouble. As the daughter yeast cells grow and split off, somehow mom retains all these protein bits.”

This startling discovery opened up an entirely new set of questions, explained Gottschling.

“It’s not clear whether the mother’s trash keeper function is a selfless act designed to give her daughters the best start possible, or if she’s hanging on to them for another reason.”

Hungry, Hoarding Mother Cells

So Gottschling and his team took a closer look at one of these proteins, known as Pma1.

Recent work by the Gottschling Lab found that cells lose their acidity over time, which itself leads to the deterioration of the cells’ primary energy source. The team hypothesized that Pma1 was somehow intricately tied to corresponding levels of pH (high pH levels indicate an acidic environment, while lower pH levels signify a more basic environment).

In the second study published in eLife, led by Postdoctoral Fellow Dr. Kiersten Henderson, the team made several intriguing discoveries about the role of Pma1.

First, they uncovered a key difference between mother and daughter cells: daughter cells are born with no Pma1. As a result, they are far more acidic than their mothers. But when they ramped up Pma1 in the mother cells, the acidity levels in subsequent generations of daughter cells changed accordingly.

“When we boosted levels of the protein, daughter cells were born with Pma1 and became more basic (they had a lower pH), just like their mothers.”

Further examination uncovered the true relationship between Pma1 and these cells. At its most fundamental, Pma1 helps the mother cells eat.

“Pma1 plays a key role in cellular feeding,” said Gottschling. “The protein sits on the surface of cells and helps them take in nutrients from their environment.”

Pma1 gives the mother cell the ability to gorge herself. The more access to food she has, the easier it is for her to produce more daughter cells. By hoarding Pma1, the mother cell can churn out more offspring. Unfortunately, she is also signing her own death certificate—she’s creating a more basic environment that, in the end, proves toxic and contributes to her death.

The hoarding, it turns out, may not all be due to the mother cells’ failure to ‘take out the trash.’ Instead, she wants to keep eating and producing daughters—and hoarding Pma1 allows her to do just that.

“There’s this whole trade off of being able to divide quickly and the negative side is that the individual, the mother, does not get to live as long.”

Together, the results from these two studies provide a huge boost for researchers like Gottschling who are trying to unravel the molecular mysteries of aging. But the process is incredibly intricate, and there will likely be no one simple solution to improving quality of life as we get older.

“The whole issue of aging is so complex that we’re still laying the groundwork of possibilities of how things can go awry,” said Gottschling. “And so we’re still learning what is going on. We’re defining the aging process.”

New Cellular Tracking Device Tests Ability of Cell-Based Therapies to Reach Intended Destination

Therapies aimed at replacing damaged cells with a fresh, healthy batch hold immense promise—but there remains one major sticking point: once you have injected new, healthy cells into the patient, how do you track them and how do you ensure they do the job for which they were designed?

New tracking technique could improve researchers' ability to test potential cell therapies.

New tracking technique could improve researchers’ ability to test potential cell therapies.

Unfortunately, there’s no easy solution. The problem of tracking the movement of cells during cell therapy is that it’s hard to stay on their trail they enter the body. They can get mixed up with other, native cells, and in order to test whether the therapy is working, doctors often have to rely on taking tissue samples.

But now, scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the University of Pittsburgh have devised an ingenious way to keep tabs on where cells go post injection. Their findings, reported last week in the journal Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, stand to help researchers identify whether cells are arriving at the correct destination.

The research team, lead by UCSD Radiology Professor Dr. Eric Ahrens, developed something called a periflourocarbon (PFC) tracer in conjunction with MRI technology. Testing this new technology in patients receiving immune cell therapy for colorectal cancer, the team found that they were better able to track the movement of the cells than with traditional methods.

“This is the first human PFC cell tracking agent, which is a new way to do MRI cell tracking,” said Ahrens in a news release. “It’s the first example of a clinical MRI agent designed specifically for cell tracking.”

They tagged these cells with atoms of fluorine, a compound that normally occurs at extremely low levels. After tagging the immune cells, the researchers could then see where they went after being injected. Importantly, the team found that more than one-half of the implanted cells left the injection site and headed towards the colon. This finding marks the first time this process had been so readily visible.

Ahrens explained the technology’s potential implications:

“The imaging agent technology has been shown to be able to tag any cell type that is of interest. It is a platform imaging technology for a wide range of diseases and applications.”

A non-invasive cell tracking solution could serve as not only as an attractive alternative to the current method of tissue sampling, it could even help fast-track through regulatory hurdles new stem cell-based therapies. According to Ahrens:

“For example, new stem cell therapies can be slow to obtain regulatory approvals in part because it is difficult, if not impossible, with current approaches to verify survival and location of transplanted cells…. Tools that allow the investigator to gain a ‘richer’ data set from individual patients mean it may be possible to reduce patient numbers enrolled in a trial, thus reducing total trial cost.”

What are the ways scientists see stem cells in the body? Check out our Spotlight Video on Magnetic Particle Imaging.