World’s largest pharmaceutical company signs deal with ViaCyte supporting stem cell therapy for type 1 diabetes

It’s been a good week for ViaCyte, a good week for us here at the stem cell agency and potentially a great week for people with type 1 diabetes.

Earlier this week ViaCyte announced they have been given approval to start a clinical trial for their new approach to treating type 1 diabetes. Then today they announced that they have signed an agreement with Janssen Research & Development LLC and its affiliated investment fund, Johnson & Johnson Development Corporation (JJDC).

ViaCyte's President & CEO, Paul Laikind

ViaCyte’s President & CEO, Paul Laikind

Under this new agreement Janssen and JJDC will provide ViaCyte with $20 million with a future right to consider a longer-term transaction related to the product candidate that ViaCyte is developing for type 1 diabetes.

The agreement is a big deal because Janssen is a division of Johnson & Johnson, which just happens to be the largest pharmaceutical company in the world (they were also ranked the world’s most respected company by Barron’s Magazine in 2008, not a bad reputation to have). Companies like this have traditionally been shy about jumping into the stem cell arena, as they wanted to be sure that they had a good chance to see a return on any investment they made. Not surprising really. You don’t get to be as successful as they are by throwing your money away.

The fact that they have decided that ViaCyte is a good investment reflects on the quality of the company, the years of hard work the people at ViaCyte have put in developing their therapy, and the impressive pre-clinical evidence that it works. It also reflects the fact that we helped fund the project, investing almost $40 million in the program, and get it to this point

In a news release we issued about the announcement our President and CEO, C. Randal Mills, said:

“This is excellent news as it demonstrates that pharmaceutical companies are recognizing stem cell therapies hold tremendous promise and need to be part of their development portfolio,” says C. Randal Mills, Ph.D., President and CEO of the stem cell agency. “This kind of serious financial commitment from industry is vital in helping get promising therapies like this through all the phases of clinical trials and, most importantly, to the patients in need.”

What’s nice is that this is not just a one-off deal. This is the third time this year that a large company has stepped in to make a deal with a company that we are funding.

In January Capricor Therapeutics signed a deal with Janssen Biotech that could ultimately be worth almost $340 million for its work using stem cells to treat people who have had a heart attack. The same month Sangamo, who we are funding to develop a treatment for beta-thalassemia, signed a potential $320 million agreement with Biogen Idec.

As Randy Mills said:

“Our goal at CIRM is to do everything we can to accelerate the development of successful therapies for people in need,” says Mills. “These kinds of agreements and investments help us do that, not only by adding an extra layer of funding for development, but also by validating the scientific and commercial potential of regenerative medicine.”

It’s great news for ViaCyte. It’s confirmation for us that we have been investing our money well in a promising therapy. But most of all it’s encouraging for anyone with type 1 diabetes, giving them a sense of hope that a new treatment could be on the horizon.

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