Stem Cells become Tool to Screen for Drugs; Fight Dangerous Heart Infections.

A Stanford study adds a powerful example to our growing list of diseases that have yielded their secrets to iPS-type stem cells grown in a dish. These “disease-in-a-dish” models have become one of the most rapidly growing areas of stem cell science. But this time they did not start with skin from a patient with a genetic disease and see how that genetic defect manifests in cells in a dish. Instead they started with normal tissue and looked at how the resulting cells reacted to viral infection.

They were looking at a nasty heart infection called viral myocarditis, which can begin to cause damage to heart muscle within hours and often leads to death. Existing antiviral drugs have only a modest impact on reducing these infections. So even though there is an urgent need to find better drugs, animal models have not proven very useful and there is no ready supply of human heart tissue for lab study.

To create a ready supply of human heart tissue Joseph Wu’s CIRM-funded team at Stanford started with skin samples from three healthy donors, reprogrammed them into iPS cells and then matured those into heart muscle tissue. Then they took one of the main culprits of this infection, coxsackievirus, and labeled it with a fluorescent marker so they could track its activity in the heart cells.

They were able to verify that the virus infected the cells in a dish just as they do in normal heart tissue. And when they tried treating the cells with four existing antiviral drugs they saw the same modest decrease in the rate of infected cells seen in patients. For one of the drugs that had been shown to cause some heart toxicity, they also saw some damage to the cells in the dish.

They propose that their model can now be used to screen thousands of compounds for potentially more effective and safer drugs. They published their results in Circulation Research July 15.

Stem Cell Agency Funded Treatment for Type 1 Diabetes Takes a Big Step towards Clinical Trials

Even the best ideas can fail without a lot of support. One of the things we pride ourselves on at the Stem Cell Agency is nurturing really promising ideas for new therapies through sustained funding, giving them the support they need to turn that promise into reality. So it’s very gratifying today to hear that one project we have supported for many years, ViaCyte’s VC-01™ implantable device for treating type 1 diabetes, just took a big step towards being tested in patients.

ViaCyte has submitted what’s called an Investigational New Drug application (“IND”) with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) asking permission to start a phase 1/2 clinical trial in patients. If the FDA says yes then ViaCyte hopes to start testing their device in patients before the end of the year.

We have invested almost $40 million in nurturing the project through the early, most basic research to see if this approach could be made to work, and then through more rigorous advanced research and testing in animals to make sure it’s safe and that it is effective.

As our Chairman, Jonathan Thomas, says in a press release we sent out announcing the news:

“We have been strong supporters of Viacyte for many years and it’s great to see that they are well on the way to starting a First-in-Human trial, hopefully in the next few months. This therapy’s growth from an idea to a potential treatment highlights CIRM’s commitment to following promising science at all stages of development.”

The device is really quite ingenious. It is a thin plastic pouch that contains an immature form of pancreatic cells. When the device is implanted under the skin these cells become the different kinds of cells needed to regulate blood glucose levels. They are able to sense when blood glucose is high, and then secrete insulin to restore it to a healthy level. The truly impressive part is that the device has holes large enough to allow insulin to be pushed out, but too small to allow the body’s own immune system to get in and attack the device.

The goal of the first phase of this clinical trial, as with all phase 1 trials, is simply to show that the VC-01™ is safe. The second phase will also look at safety but also test it to see if it is helping patients, reducing their dependence on injected insulin. If the results from both those phases are encouraging, the next step is to test it in much larger numbers of patients to see just how effective it is.

But this first step, submitting an application to the FDA, is the starting point for all that. As our President and CEO C. Randal Mills said in our news release, getting to the starting line is often half the battle:

“This is good news for ViaCyte and is an encouraging sign of the progress they are making. Filing for an IND is a crucial step along the path to making a therapy available to patients and we’ll be working with them and supporting them every step of the way to try and make this happen as quickly, and as safely, as possible.”

You can read more about ViaCyte and our support for them on our website.